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The Future of Prostate Cancer Research and Treatment
 
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YouTube Live Thursday, January 12, 2017 2:30 - 3:30pm ET Prostate cancer experts William Dahut, M.D. of the National Cancer Institute and Dr. Heather Cheng, M.D. of the University of Washington discuss current and future research areas and treatment options for prostate cancer. The panel was moderated by Ana Fadich, MPH, CHES Vice President at Men’s Health of the Men's Health Network. http://www.cancer.gov/prostate http://www.cancer.gov/social-media/events
Saving Men's Lives:  the Institute for Prostate Cancer Research
 
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The institute is a collaborative effort of UW Medicine and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. A natural outgrowth of established research and clinical collaborations, the IPCR brings together a world-renowned team whose mission is to understand the causes of prostate cancer and its progression, develop new prevention strategies, devise innovative diagnostics and improve survival and quality of life.
Views: 566 UWMedicineHealth
Clinical research in prostate cancer
 
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Department of Medicine Grand Rounds presentation by Dr. Evan Yu, Professor, Division of Medical Oncology Department of Medicine University of Washington School of Medicine
Views: 106 UWDeptMedicine
Family Cancer Risk
 
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It’s estimated that one out of every six men will get prostate cancer in their lifetime. In some cases, the cancer risk is passed on from father to son – and even to a daughter. By better understanding the genetic mutations that exist within an individual's cancer, researchers at the University of Washington and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center are able to personalize and target cancer treatment. This technology is helping a central Washington family find answers. For more information about the research mentioned in this story, please visit: http://www.uwmedicine.org/research/uw-medicine-research/translational-sciences/ipcr Dr. Peter Nelson, oncologist, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, professor, UW Medicine Todd Braman, UW Medicine patient Helga Braman, wife of patient 5/8/16 http://uwtv.org
Views: 112 UWTV
Prostate Cancer: Advanced Disease
 
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Experts from the University of Washington and Seattle Cancer Care Alliance discuss advances in the treatment of patients with prostate cancer. This program presents innovative research into the genetic causes of prostate cancer, explores new ways in which molecular biology is improving treatment, and presents novel approaches in hormone therapy and chemotherapy for patients with advanced prostate cancer.
Views: 133 UWTV
The Prostate Cancer Biorepository Network (PCBN)
 
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Bruce Trock, MPH, PhD, Johns Hopkins University; Jonathan Melamed, MD, New York University; Anuradha Gopalan, MD, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; and Robert Vessella, PhD, University of Washington. The PCBN is a CDMRP-funded project supported by the DoD Prostate Cancer Research Program (PCRP).
Views: 161 CDMRP
GW Cancer Center Opens Doors to Care, Research
 
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Years of hard work and dedication toward enhancing George Washington University’s (GW) cancer research and care culminated on Dec. 7 at the grand opening of the GW Cancer Center’s (GWCC) new space in the Science and Engineering Hall (SEH).
Views: 164 GWSMHS
PROSTATE CANCER TREATMENT,  SEATTLE produced by Kemp Communications
 
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http://www.kempcomm.com 206.363.7734 kempcomm@mac.com This is an excerpt from a marketing video produced produced by Kemp Communications for Dr. Robert Takamiya, MD, and his colleagues at Swedish Prostate Institute in Seattle. The video's focus is on the highly effective use of seed brachytherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. Kemp Communications is a Seattle video production company. Our focus is primarily upon producing videos for our clients' Web sites. Video production for our business and government clients' Web sites is now the norm. That's because after years in limbo, the Web is finally becoming what it should be--a medium heavily driven by video, and the pace is quickening exponentially. Cisco Systems recently confirmed this in its annual forecast of Internet growth, concluding that video will be the driving force behind a massive increase in Internet traffic in coming years. Key factors include Broadband penetration, and the rapid penetration of G4 smartphones and Apple's iPad. At Kemp Communications, we produce high quality, effective videos. The medical sector is our biggest production category (marketing, training, clinical trials for entities such as the NIH, Amgen, AstraZeneca, University of Washington, and many more). Other major lines of business include Seattle environmental solutions-video, Seattle training videos, Seattle marketing videos, Seattle public relations video, Seattle security videos and much more. Of course, we work regionally and nationally, but our base, and most of our work, is here.
Views: 213 Jerry KEMP
Dr. Higano on Changes Being Made in the Field of Prostate Cancer
 
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Celestia Higano, MD, professor of Medicine and Urology at the University of Washington, and a member of the Clinical Research Division at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, discusses the changes being made in the field of prostate cancer.
Views: 53 OncLiveTV
Dr. Yu on Free Testosterone Levels in Men Who Have Undergone Orchiectomy
 
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Evan Y. Yu, MD, associate professor, Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, discusses an analysis of optimal testosterone suppression on medical ADT. More on prostate cancer: http://www.onclive.com/specialty/prostate-cancer
Views: 2109 OncLiveTV
Should Radium 223 Be Given Earlier to Metastatic Prostate Cancer Patients?
 
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Evan Y. Yu, MD, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, discusses radiopharmaceuticals in clinical trials for patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer.
prostate cancer treatment
 
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SCCA Proton Therapy, A ProCure Center 1570 N 115th St. Seattle, WA 98133 (206) 306-2800 https://www.sccaprotontherapy.com/ "Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and ProCure have been treating cancer for years. We give you the doctors and resources from Seattle Children’s, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington. Being one of only a dozen sites in the country that offer Proton Therapy, SCCA gives you the advantage of cutting edge therapy. Proton Therapy is a targeted type of radiation, that will give less recovery time with the added benefit of less side effects"
The State of the Prostate, Part 3
 
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The latest prostate cancer diagnostics, prognostics, and treatments and strategies. Peter S. Nelson, M.D., Professor, Medical Oncology, UW School of Medicine 5/3/2012
Views: 43 UWTV
Hypermutation & Genomic Testing for Precision Therapy in Advanced Prostate Cancer
 
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Colin Pritchard, MD, PhD, University of Washington. Dr. Pritchard is a CDMRP-funded investigator supported by the DoD Prostate Cancer Research Program (PCRP).
Views: 127 CDMRP
prostate cancer treatment
 
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SCCA Proton Therapy, A ProCure Center 1570 N 115th St. Seattle, WA 98133 (206) 306-2800 https://www.sccaprotontherapy.com/ Seattle Cancer Care Alliance is a world class treatment center. We have doctors from UW, Seattle Children’s Hospital, and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. If you have a cancer diagnosis, we offer you the best care possible. Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and ProCure have been treating cancer for years. We give you the doctors and resources from Seattle Children’s, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington. Being one of only a dozen sites in the country that offer Proton Therapy, SCCA gives you the advantage of cutting edge therapy. Proton Therapy is a targeted type of radiation, that will give less recovery time with the added benefit of less side effects.
Dr. Higano on Docetaxel for Hormone-Sensitive Prostate Cancer
 
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Celestia Higano, MD, professor of Medicine and Urology, University of Washington, member of the Clinical Research Division at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, discusses results of docetaxel (Taxotere) versus hormone therapy in patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.
Views: 89 OncLiveTV
2016 Prostate Cancer IMPaCT Meeting Highlights
 
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On August 4-5, the DoD Prostate Cancer Research Program (PCRP) hosted IMPaCT 2016, a meeting intended to provide new investigators and physician-scientists with an opportunity to discuss their research with their peers, leading prostate cancer experts, and survivors, and to foster new collaborations that will facilitate research aimed at addressing critical issues in prostate cancer. Featured in this video highlight: Donald Tindall, PhD, Formerly Mayo Clinic (Ret.); Adam Dicker, MD, PhD, Thomas Jefferson University; Joel Nowak, MSW, MA, MaleCare, Inc.; David VanderWeele, MD, PhD, National Cancer Institute; Himisha Beltran, MD, Weill Cornell Medicine; Natasha Kyprianou, PhD, University of Kentucky; Folakemi Odedina, PhD, University of Florida; Karen Sfanos, MS, PhD, Johns Hopkins University; Timothy McDonnell, MD, PhD, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center; COL Paul Taylor, MPA, ZERO; and Hung-Ming Lam, PhD, University of Washington.
Views: 299 CDMRP
Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Consortium (PCCTC)
 
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Tomasz Beer, MD, FACP, Oregon Health and Science University; Elisabeth I. Heath, MD, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University; Celestia S. Higano, MD, University of Washington, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Cancer; Howard I. Scher, MD, Sidney Kimmel Center for Prostate and Urologic Cancers, Memorial Sloan-Kettering. The Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Consortium is a CDMRP-funded project supported by the DoD Prostate Cancer Research Program (PCRP). Bringing the "Best of the Best" to Prostate Cancer Patients.
Views: 81 CDMRP
University of Washington Medicine Pituitary Program: A Comprehensive Treatment Plan
 
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The UW Medicine Pituitary Program provides comprehensive treatment to patients with disorders of the pituitary gland and hypothalamus. The multidisciplinary team of experts has vast experience managing a broad spectrum of pituitary disorders, from the simple to complex. In addition to the clinical excellence practiced at UW Medicine, research and education are among the top priorities. To see more visit - http://url.bcst.md/univec4876
Dr. Higano on the Effectiveness of PARP Inhibitors for Prostate Cancer
 
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Celestia Higano, MD, professor of Medicine and Urology at the University of Washington, and a member of the Clinical Research Division at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, discusses the effectiveness of PARP inhibitors for patients with metastatic prostate cancer.
Views: 41 OncLiveTV
Prostate Cancer Outcomes in VA Hospitals
 
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Bettina Drake, PhD, MPH; Washington University in St. Louis. Dr. Drake is a CDMRP-funded investigator supported by the DoD Prostate Cancer Research Program (PCRP).
Views: 79 CDMRP
prostate cancer treatment
 
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SCCA Proton Therapy, A ProCure Center 1570 N 115th St. Seattle, WA 98133 (206) 306-2800 https://www.sccaprotontherapy.com/ "Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and ProCure have been treating cancer for years. We give you the doctors and resources from Seattle Children’s, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington. Being one of only a dozen sites in the country that offer Proton Therapy, SCCA gives you the advantage of cutting edge therapy. Proton Therapy is a targeted type of radiation, that will give less recovery time with the added benefit of less side effects"
Changing the Culture of Cancer Care, Part 2
 
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UW Medicine's 2014 Mini-Medical School is a series of lectures and demonstrations designed to teach viewers about medical science, patient care and leading-edge research underway at the University of Washington. Taking healthcare communications and personalized medicine for cancer care to the next level. Part two is presented by Doctor Eric Holland, from the UW School of Medicine and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Eric Holland, M.D., Ph.D., professor, UW Department of Medicine, Neurological Surgery 03/04/2014 Health and Medicine http://uwtv.org
Views: 113 UWTV
Dr Anirban Basu (University of Washington): Economics of Cancer Research Symposium
 
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"Prostatectomy versus Watchful Waiting among elderly patients with clinically localized Prostate Cancer: Exploring heterogeneity in Survival Effects" (with John Gore): Video and Slides. 2nd September, NUI Galway
Views: 195 ECRG NUI Galway
Dr. Higano on Radium-223 for Prostate Cancer
 
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Celestia Higano, MD, professor of Medicine and Urology at the University of Washington, and a member of the Clinical Research Division at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, discusses radium-223 for patients with prostate cancer.
Views: 51 OncLiveTV
Dr. Higano on Combinations With Radium-223 for Prostate Cancer
 
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Celestia Higano, MD, professor of Medicine and Urology at the University of Washington, and a member of the Clinical Research Division at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, discusses risks associated with combining radium-223 for patients with prostate cancer.
Views: 46 OncLiveTV
Dr. Michalski on Escalated Dose Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer
 
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Jeff Michalski, MD, professor, vice chair of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Siteman Cancer Center, discusses results of a study comparing standard dose radiation therapy to escalated dose for patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer.
Views: 124 OncLiveTV
Let's Talk about Prostate Cancer with Tia Higano
 
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Celestia (Tia) Higano, MD, is a medical oncologist and professor of oncology and urology at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington. She specializes in the treatment of advanced forms of prostate cancer, and she has been involved in clinical trials of many of the drugs now being used or investigated for their potential in the treatment of hormone-refractory and metastatic prostate cancer.
Views: 591 PCaInternational
IPCR 2014 Symposium: Advances in Treating Advanced Prostate Cancer Part 4
 
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IPCR Symposium 2014: Advances and breakthroughs in prostate cancer research presented by the team at the Institute for Prostate Cancer Research (IPCR), a collaborative partnership between the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC) and UW Medicine.
Views: 123 Act Smart
IPCR 2014 Symposium: Advances in Managing Localized Prostate Cancer Part 1
 
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Dr. Paul Lange: Understandign the Diversity of Localized Prostate Cancer Dr. Dan Lin: Active Surveillance: What We Have Learnedfrom PASS Dr. Kenneth Russell: Proton THerapy: Up and Going in Seattle (Part 1) IPCR Symposium 2014: Advances and breakthroughs in prostate cancer research presented by the team at the Institute for Prostate Cancer Research (IPCR), a collaborative partnership between the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC) and UW Medicine.
Views: 474 Act Smart
New Promise for Prostate Cancer
 
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Potentially life-saving research from Dr. Cliff Berkman of Washington State University.
Celestia S. Higano on Sexual Health and Pelvic Floor Physiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Patients
 
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Celestia S. Higano, MD, professor, Medical Oncology Division, University of Washington School of Medicine, discusses an analysis looking at sexual health and pelvic floor physiotherapy services for patients with prostate cancer. This research was presented at the 2016 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), a gathering of over 30,000 oncology professionals in Chicago. View more at http://curetoday.com/ CURE: Combining science and humanity to make cancer understandable.
Views: 183 curetoday
UW Medicine Emily
 
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Emily is suffering from prostate cancer
Views: 16 exclaimseattle
Scouting the course for Hoodoo supermoto
 
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Helmet cam footage of the proposed course at Hoodoo for the University of Washington Prostate Cancer Research Fund charity race.
Views: 136 jak634
ASCO 2012: Prostate Cancer
 
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Dr. Charles J. Ryan of the University of California, San Francisco, joins Dr. Walter M. Stadler, associate editor of The Oncology Report, in a discussion of leading prostate cancer research at the 2012 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Topics include the pivotal abiraterone trial results presented by Dr. Ryan, novel androgen inhibitors, the role of prednisone, and the controversial conclusions of the largest and longest study comparing intermittent with continuous androgen deprivation therapy.
Views: 363 MDedge
Fish Oil Gives You Cancer OR Is It Healthy?
 
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Fish Oil Gives You Cancer OR Is It Healthy? Read below for more info http://www.timescolonist.com/life/fis... SEATTLE — Taking fish-oil supplements or even eating too much fatty fish may be linked to an increased risk for prostate cancer, according to a new study from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. The result confirms findings from an earlier study by the same team, but they are puzzling, given fish oil's supposed anti-inflammatory effect, which would protect against cancer. Researchers could not offer a biological reason for the link, and called for more study. The study analyzed levels of omega-3 fatty acids — the type of oil found in some fish — in the blood of 834 men who developed prostate cancer race- and age-matched with 1,393 men who did not. Men who had the highest levels of omega-3 fatty acids had a 43 per cent increase in risk for prostate cancer and 71 per cent increase in risk for the high-grade prostate cancer that is the most likely to be fatal. These results were published online Wednesday by the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Researchers affiliated with institutions including the University of Washington, the National Cancer Institute and Cleveland Clinic were also involved. An initial 2011 study, which found similar results in a different group of men, surprised epidemiology professor Alan Kristal's team at the Seattle research centre. "To be honest, I didn't believe it," Kristal said last week. "It was striking enough to get it into the literature just to see if anyone would repeat it." The team's most recent study — and another European study — confirmed the earlier findings. The newest data come from a study whose initial goal, when it began in 2001, was investigating the roles of selenium and vitamin E in prostate cancer. Researchers collected blood samples from study subjects, who were not given dietary instructions for omega-3 intake. The highest blood levels of three omega-3 fatty acids — EPA, DPA and DHA — were consistent with taking fish-oil supplements or eating at least three servings of fish per week. Those men with the highest levels were the most likely to eventually be diagnosed with prostate cancer. However, Kristal notes that different people can have somewhat different levels of omega-3 fatty acids in their blood despite similar intake. The link between prostate cancer and eating fatty fish or taking fish-oil supplements is far from clear. Other studies have found a protective effect, though a large analysis of many studies found that fish oil had no compelling effect on cancer risk in general Edward Giovannucci of the Harvard School of Public Health, who was not involved in the study, noted in an email that this study looked at diagnosis but not patient outcomes. Prostate cancers can lie dormant for decades, and the risk factors for developing a tumour may not be the same as those that cause a tumour to become fatal. The researchers conceded they did not know of a biological mechanism to explain their findings. "If there were a compelling mechanism, that would make the findings more worrisome," added Giovannucci. Nevertheless, Kristal said his study should make men think twice about taking fish-oil supplements or eating more than two servings of fish per week. Omega-3 fatty-acid supplements and enriched foods account for more than $5 billion in sales every year, according to a market-research report from Packaged Facts. Kristal emphasizes that his study casts doubt on the health effect of dietary supplements such as fish oil and vitamins. In the same study, researchers had previously found that vitamin E was also linked to increased risk for prostate cancer. "Humans are designed for a certain level of micronutrients, and huge doses may not be good," Kristal said. "More micronutrients does not mean better health and sometimes means worse."
Views: 1879 durianreider
Frontiers in Precision Medicine II: Cancer, Big Data and the Public - Session 1 & 2
 
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CLE available. For the certificate email cle@law.utah.edu. For CLE submission form and instructions visit http://www.law.utah.edu/alumni/cle/ http://www.law.utah.edu/event/precision-medicine-accurate-data-and-the-cancer-moonshot/ Sponsored by the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law’s Center for Law and Biomedical Sciences, University of Utah Health Sciences, and Huntsman Cancer Institute. 9:00-9:30am Welcome and Opening Remarks • Vivian Lee, M.D., Ph.D., M.B.A., University of Utah 10:40-11:40am Session 1: Tackling Cancer with Precision Data This session will explore current approaches to clinical precision oncology and the practical aspects of utilizing the large data sets generated in precision oncology for patient care. 9:30-10:30am a. The Science of Precision Oncology moderated by Ana Maria Lopez, M.D., M.P.H. • Kathleen Cooney, M.D., University of Utah • Scott Tomlins, M.D., University of Michigan 10:40-11:40am b. The Challenges of Big Data moderated by Kensaku Kawamoto, M.H.S., M.D., Ph.D. • Samir Courdy, MBA, Huntsman Cancer Institute • Rakesh Nagarajan, M.D., Ph.D., Washington University in St. Louis • David Nix, Ph.D., Huntsman Cancer Institute 11:50-12:40pm Session 2: Precision Prevention moderated by Cornelia Ulrich, M.S., Ph.D. Current techniques for cancer prevention based on genetic information will be discussed, specifically in the context of colorectal and lung cancers. • Cornelia Ulrich, M.S., Ph.D., University of Utah • Ulrike Peters, M.P.H., Ph.D., M.S., University of Washington, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center • Marc Lenburg, Ph.D., Boston University School of Medicine
Androgen signaling in advanced prostate cancer models using noninvasive hyper polarized M
 
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Speaker: Mark Titus, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology Biography: Dr. Titus earned his Ph.D. from the University of Washington, Seattle Washington and completed his postdoctoral research in the Laboratories for Reproductive Biology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine at Chapel Hill, North Carolina. His initial faculty appointment was in the Department of Urology at Roswell Park Cancer Center, Buffalo NY. In 2012, Dr. Titus joined the faculty in Genitourinary Medical Oncology at MD Anderson Cancer Center. WEBINAR: Androgen signaling in advanced prostate cancer models using noninvasive hyper polarized MRI and mass spectrometry Abstract: Androgen receptor (AR) signaling remains a driver in the lethal phenotype of prostate cancer, castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Novel second generation enhanced androgen inhibitors, abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide, improve survival of CRPC patients following androgen deprivation therapy. However, a significant group of patients demonstrate primary resistance to these agents and other patients acquire resistance during therapy. The mechanisms of enhanced androgen inhibitor resistance are complex. AR-dependent mechanisms involve AR overexpression, AR mutation, intra-tumor ligand biosynthesis, modulation of co-activators and co-repressors and expression of AR spice variants. AR-independent tumors activate glucocorticoid receptor and differentiate to aggressive variant or neuroendocrine phenotype with loss of tumor suppressors. Patient derived xenografts (PDX) developed from men with AR-positive or AR-negative CRPC were used to determine impact of AR signaling on glycolysis. We used two AR positive (MDA-PCa-133 and 180-30) and 2 AR negative (MDA-PCa-144 and 155) PDX grown in intact male mice. In vivo hyperpolarized MRI of each PDX was performed at a tumor volume of ~1.0 cm3 using 1-[13C]-pyruvate conversion to 1-[13C]-lactate. Ex vivo measurement of glycolytic metabolites, lactate, tricarboxylic acids and unique cancer metabolites were determined using NMR and mass spectrometry. We found increased glycolysis and alterations in other bioenergy metabolites in AR-positive PDX models and in low androgen environment (castration) versus AR-negative models. Our research supports the potential of hyperpolarized metabolic imaging in determining the underlying biology and in vivo phenotyping of CRPC. SPONSORED BY: Agilent Technologies Earn PACE Credits: 1. Make sure you’re a registered member of LabRoots https://www.labroots.com/ms/webinar/androgen-signaling-advanced-prostate-cancer-models-using-noninvasive-hyperpolarized-mri-mass 2. Watch the webinar on YouTube or on the LabRoots Website https://www.labroots.com/ms/webinar/androgen-signaling-advanced-prostate-cancer-models-using-noninvasive-hyperpolarized-mri-mass 3. Click Here to get your PACE credits: Expiration Date: December 05, 2019 06:00 AM http://www.labroots.com/credit/pace-credits/2555/third-party LabRoots on Social: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LabRootsInc Twitter: https://twitter.com/LabRoots LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/labroots Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/labrootsinc Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/labroots/ SnapChat: labroots_inc
Views: 54 LabRoots
childhood cancer treatment
 
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SCCA Proton Therapy, A ProCure Center 1570 N 115th St. Seattle, WA 98133 (206) 306-2800 https://www.sccaprotontherapy.com/ Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and ProCure have been treating cancer for years. We give you the doctors and resources from Seattle Children’s, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington. Being one of only a dozen sites in the country that offer Proton Therapy, SCCA gives you the advantage of cutting edge therapy. Proton Therapy is a targeted type of radiation, that will give less recovery time with the added benefit of less side effects.
Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine
 
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The Siteman Cancer Center – located in St. Louis, Missouri - is one of the largest cancer centers in the United States. The Center is part of Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine. Siteman Cancer Center has developed a promising new type of immunotherapy in cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that recur after treatment or that never respond to therapy in the first place. For this immune therapy, the NK (natural killer) cells are taken from a donor who is closely related to the patient, usually an adult child, parent or sibling. After separating the donor’s NK cells from the rest of the blood, the cells are incubated overnight in a mixture of interleukins 12, 15 and 18. These chemical signals activate the NK cells and “train” them to attack the leukemia cells more effectively when they are encountered in the patient following infusion. To prepare for this NK cell therapy, the patient undergoes chemotherapy to suppress the immune system so that the donor’s activated NK cells have the time and space to multiply in the patient’s bloodstream and go after the cancer cells. As the patient’s immune system recovers, it clears the donor’s NK cells from the body, eliminating the possibility of long-term adverse events. To learn more, watch interviews with the doctors & researchers behind this exciting clinical trial – and the patient who benefitted greatly from this treatment. https://siteman.wustl.edu
Views: 2144 WebsEdgeHealth
IPCR 2014 Symposium: Prostate Cancer Risk & Prevention : Imaging
 
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Dr. Evan Yu: Imaging Prostate Cancer: Present and Future IPCR Symposium 2014: Advances and breakthroughs in prostate cancer research presented by the team at the Institute for Prostate Cancer Research (IPCR), a collaborative partnership between the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC) and UW Medicine.
Views: 122 Act Smart
Jacqueline Burgess Of George Washington University Cancer
 
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Jacqueline Burgess, Cancer Outreach and Education Specialist of The George Washington University Cancer Institute, talks about the prostate health symposium in Washington D.C. organized by Men's Health Network
Views: 303 MHNMedia
Molecular Testing in Breast Cancer: Will it Become Standard Practice? - Kimberly Allison, MD
 
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How has gene expression profiling impacted the way we diagnose and treat breast cancers? Kimberly Allison, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Pathology at the University of Washington discusses how research using gene expression signatures have been used to identify specific subtypes of breast cancer and how these are integrated into traditional classification schemes. In addition, we will explore the development of clinically available gene expression array-based tests that are designed to give prognostic and predictive information tailored to individual breast cancer patients and discuss current limitations of these tests." Kimberly Allison, MD
Views: 1181 UWTV
Washington State University Presents The Innovators: Supercomputing, the Cancer Moonshot and Beyond
 
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Designing the next generation of supercomputers for biomedical research. Guest lecture by Dr. Dimitri Kusnezov, U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration. September 20, 2016 event sponsored by the Allen Institute for Brain Science and Washington Research Foundation.
proton therapy
 
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SCCA Proton Therapy, A ProCure Center 1570 N 115th St. Seattle, WA 98133 (206) 306-2800 https://www.sccaprotontherapy.com/ Seattle Cancer Care Alliance is a world class treatment center. We have doctors from UW, Seattle Children’s Hospital, and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. If you have a cancer diagnosis, we offer you the best care possible. Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and ProCure have been treating cancer for years. We give you the doctors and resources from Seattle Children’s, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington. Being one of only a dozen sites in the country that offer Proton Therapy, SCCA gives you the advantage of cutting edge therapy. Proton Therapy is a targeted type of radiation, that will give less recovery time with the added benefit of less side effects.
Views: 18 sccaproton therapy
Novel Brachytherapy for Breast Cancer Treatment
 
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Azab Lab Cancer Biology Division, Department of Radiation Oncology Washington University in Saint Louis School of Medicine http://radonc.wustl.edu/research/cancerbio/azab/index.aspx
Views: 1126 Kareem Azab
BCRF 2008 Symposium 15
 
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BRCA genes /  lifestyle factors and PARP inhibitors Response by: Mary-Claire King, PhD (from the audience) American Cancer Society Professor, Departments of Medicine and Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Alan Ashworth, BSc, PhD, FRS (from the audience) Professor, Molecular Biology and Director, The Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Centre, The Institute of Cancer Research, London, UK
Carla Grandori Part I - Entrepreneurial Fellows Lecture
 
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Part I of University of Washington Pharmacology Professor Carla Grandori's lecture titled "Cures for Cancer—Hidden in Plain Sight? An Enterprise to Accelerate their Discovery." The UW Presidential Entrepreneurial Faculty Fellows lecture series is designed to inspire UW researchers to pursue commercialization of their innovations by showcasing UW Faculty who have succeeded in translating their research into products and therapies, initiated groundbreaking programs for translation, or established model collaborations with industry. Read more at http://www.uwc4c.com/for-researchers/entrepreneurial-faculty-fellows/
Views: 663 UW CoMotion
4 Early Warning Signs of Prostate Cancer: Understanding Prostate Cancer Symptoms
 
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4 Early Warning Signs of Prostate Cancer: Understanding Prostate Cancer Symptoms If you’re a man, the federal government estimates that you have about a one-in-seven chance of developing prostate cancer at some point during your lifetime. Based on 2012 data, nearly three million American men are currently living with prostate cancer. Although the condition is highly treatable, many men are suffering needlessly because they didn’t know the signs of cancer and catch it before it reached an advanced stage of cancer. Or they didn’t know the causes of prostate cancer and what to do to avoid it. Knowing how to identify the early-onset signs and symptoms of prostate cancer is critical. It could mean the difference between having to undergo invasive radiation treatment and surgery (and suffering through a laundry list of side effects in the process), or making simple dietary and lifestyle changes now to nip this cancer in the bud and stop it from growing and spreading. Where is Your Prostate? Only men have a prostate, which is a walnut-sized gland located directly under the bladder in front of the rectumm. It surrounds the urethra, the tube that carries urinee and semenn out of the body. The prostate gland can affect urinee control, known as continence. How to Know if You Have Prostate Cancer: Is PSA Testing a Valid Risk Indicator? Getting your prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels tested on a routine basis is what the medical system says is the best way to catch prostate cancer early and eradicate it with minimal intervention. High PSA levels are suggestive of prostate cancer onset, the public has long been told. Men who fall into this category are often encouraged to get biopsied and undergo invasive treatment like surgery and radiation. The problem is that a biopsy or the prostate “removal” operation can cause a dormant cancer to spread through the rest of the body. The PSA test is known as the “gold standard” for detecting prostate cancer. But is it really? Does a high PSA equal prostate cancer? This is an important question, because a high PSA leads most men straight to biopsies, then to “the knife,” and then straight to pain, incontinence, and erectile issues such as impotence. Of course, let’s not forget that these procedures will guarantee billions of dollars for your doctor and the medical industrial complex. According to recent articles in the New York Times and Washington Post, PSA tests are essentially worthless. You see, the PSA test simply reveals how much of the prostate antigen a man has in his blood, which is a marker of inflammation and can indicate cancer, but not necessarily. You see, infections, benign swelling of the prostate, and over-the-counter drugs (like Ibuprofen) are all factors that can elevate a man’s PSA level. Dr. Thomas Stamey of Stanford University was one of the original boosters of the PSA test. At a 2004 conference, he stated, “PSA no longer has a relationship to prostate cancer. The PSA test is not relevant any more. You might as well biopsy a man because he has blue eyes.” In fact, the PSA test has been such a dismal failure in detecting prostate cancer, its inventor (Richard J. Ablin) has been speaking out against his own discovery for more than a decade! Most recently, in a March 2010 edition of The New York Times, Ablin wrote, “The [PSA] test is hardly more effective than a coin toss. As I’ve been trying to make clear for many years now, PSA testing can’t detect prostate cancer…The test’s popularity has led to a hugely expensive public health disaster.” On a side note, a large body of evidence demonstrates that PSA is not a “prostate-specific” antigen at all. As a matter of fact, PSA has been shown to be expressed in many forms of female tissues. The breastt is a major female organn able to produce PSA. Your Urinee Can Reveal 4 Signs of Prostate Cancer To avoid this latter type, it’s important to educate yourself on the most common signs of prostate cancer in men associated with the development of prostate tumors. 4 Early Warning Signs of Prostate Cancer Symptoms of prostate cancer in men include bladder and urinary problems that result in: 1. painful or difficult urination, and frequent urination, especially at night 2. loss of bladder control 3. reduced urinary flow or velocity 4. blood in the urinee (a condition known as hematuria) Help us to be better Like, Comment, Subscribe and invite all your friends to see our videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUOF1_1_fY50PVN0TtItbDQ?sub_confirmation=1 More from Stay Healthy: 1. The Top 9 Signs That Your Infant May Have Autism. #6 Really Surprised Me! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wRLeGCR-I54 2. 10 Early Warning Signs and Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFgNPnRDogw 3. 16 Early Signs and Symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IpMW-3KOZ_o 4 Early Warning Signs of Prostate Cancer: Understanding Prostate Cancer Symptoms By Stay Healthy
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Insidermedicine In Depth - March 31, 2010 - Dutasteride (Avodart)
 
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A drug used to treat symptoms associated with having an enlarged prostate also reduces the risk of developing prostate cancer among high risk men, according to research published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Risk factors for prostate cancer include: • Increasing age • Being African American • Having a first-degree relative with the condition Researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis randomly assigned nearly 7,000 men aged 50 to 75 with elevated levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), an indicator of an increased risk for prostate cancer, to treatment with dutasteride, also known as Avodart, or a placebo. The men all underwent a biopsy of their prostate at the outset of the study to ensure they did not have prostate cancer. They then had repeated prostate biopsies over a 4-year period to determine who would develop the disease. As expected, men taking dutasteride were 77% less likely to suffer from acute urinary retention, a condition associated with an enlarged prostate, than those on placebo. But the men taking the medication were also nearly 23% less likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer. Late in the study, men taking dutasteride who did develop tumors in their prostates were less likely to have highly aggressive forms of prostate cancer. Todays research highlights the benefits of dutasteride for preventing prostate cancer among men at high risk for the condition.
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