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Six liver cancer patients in Hong Kong recover after new form of hepatectomy
 
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For story suggestions please contact tips@nma.com.tw The University of Hong Kong has successfully performed a novel form of hepatectomy in six patients with liver cancer. All of the patients made a successful recovery without complications, including a six-year-old in the world's first such operation. The surgery, known as associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for stage hepatectomy, or ALPPS, was first performed two years ago, but according to the South China Morning Post, about 30 percent of the patients who underwent such surgery suffered complications. About 70 to 80 percent of tumours form in the right lobe of the liver, which is larger than the left lobe. Removing the right lobe poses a great risk to the patient. The first step of ALPPS involves the removal of the portal veins from the right lobe. The surgeon will use an ultrasonic dissector to separate the two lobes causing more blood to be pumped into the left lobe. Within eight days, the size of the left lobe increased by an average of 33 percent. When the left lobe grows to a certain size, the right lobe can be removed after its hepatic artery and duct bile are cut out.
Views: 1603 News Direct
Six liver cancer patients in Hong Kong recover after new form of hepatectomy
 
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Originally published April 17, 2014 Check out our official website: http://us.tomonews.net/ Check out our Android app: http://goo.gl/PtT6VD Check out our iOS app: http://bit.ly/1gO3z1f ----------------------------------------­----------------------------------------­---------------- The University of Hong Kong has successfully performed a novel form of hepatectomy in six patients with liver cancer. All of the patients made a successful recovery without complications, including a six-year-old in the world's first such operation. The surgery, known as associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for stage hepatectomy, or ALPPS, was first performed two years ago, but according to the South China Morning Post, about 30 percent of the patients who underwent such surgery suffered complications. About 70 to 80 percent of tumours form in the right lobe of the liver, which is larger than the left lobe. Removing the right lobe poses a great risk to the patient. The first step of ALPPS involves the removal of the portal veins from the right lobe. The surgeon will use an ultrasonic dissector to separate the two lobes causing more blood to be pumped into the left lobe. Within eight days, the size of the left lobe increased by an average of 33 percent. When the left lobe grows to a certain size, the right lobe can be removed after its hepatic artery and duct bile are cut out. ----------------------------------------­----------------------------------------­---------------- Welcome to TomoNews, where we animate the most entertaining news on the internets. Come here for an animated look at viral headlines, US news, celebrity gossip, salacious scandals, dumb criminals and much more! Subscribe now for daily news animations that will knock your socks off. Check out our Android app: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.nextmedia.gan Check out our iOS app: https://itunes.apple.com/app/tomonews/id633875353 For news that's fun and never boring, visit our channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/TomoNewsUS Subscribe to stay updated on all the top stories: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCt-WqkTyKK1_70U4bb4k4lQ?sub_confirmation=1 Stay connected with us here: Facebook http://www.facebook.com/TomoNewsUS Twitter @tomonewsus http://www.twitter.com/TomoNewsUS Google+ http://plus.google.com/+TomoNewsUS/ Instagram @tomonewsus http://instagram.com/tomonewsus -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Crying dog breaks the internet’s heart — but this sad dog story has a happy ending" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4prKTN9bYQc -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 2483 TomoNews US
Laparoscopic Liver Mass Removal at Sunrise Hospital Delhi
 
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60Yrs. old female presented with epigastric pain. On USG 4cm X 5cm left lobe liver mass. This patient was operated at sunrise Hospital Delhi
Hepatocellular carcinoma left lobe CECT scan
 
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60 Year old male patient with palpable lump in epigastrium
Six liver cancer patients in Hong Kong recover after undergoing new form of hepatectomy
 
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The University of Hong Kong has successfully performed a novel form of hepatectomy in six patients with liver cancer. All of the patients made a successful recovery without complications, including a six-year-old in the world’s first such operation. The surgery, known as associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for stage hepatectomy, or ALPPS, was first performed two years ago, but according to the South China Morning Post, about 30 percent of the patients who underwent such surgery suffered complications. About 70 to 80 percent of tumours form in the right lobe of the liver, which is larger than the left lobe. Removing the right lobe poses a great risk to the patient. The first step of ALPPS involves the removal of the portal veins from the right lobe. The surgeon will use an ultrasonic dissector to separate the two lobes causing more blood to be pumped into the left lobe. Within eight days, the size of the left lobe increased by an average of 33 percent. When the left lobe grows to a certain size, the right lobe can be removed after its hepatic artery and duct bile are cut out. ----------------------------------------­--------------------- Welcome to TomoNews, where we animate the most entertaining news on the internets. Come here for an animated look at viral headlines, US news, celebrity gossip, salacious scandals, dumb criminals and much more! Subscribe now for daily news animations that will knock your socks off. Visit our official website for all the latest, uncensored videos: http://us.tomonews.com Check out our Android app: http://bit.ly/1rddhCj Check out our iOS app: http://bit.ly/1gO3z1f Get top stories delivered to your inbox everyday: http://bit.ly/tomo-newsletter See a story that should be animated? Tell us about it! Suggest a story here: http://bit.ly/suggest-tomonews Stay connected with us here: Facebook http://www.facebook.com/TomoNewsUS Twitter @tomonewsus http://www.twitter.com/TomoNewsUS Google+ http://plus.google.com/+TomoNewsUS/ Instagram @tomonewsus http://instagram.com/tomonewsus
Right lobe Liver cyst
 
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A huge right lobe liver cyst, deroofed and biopsied laparoscopically
Left Hepatectomy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma (supported with English audio)
 
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This surgery was performed to the patient who was operated for lung cancer about 1,5 years ago. During CT scan we found liver malignant tumor that was verified as HCC. Open Anatomical standard left hepatectomy (2,3,4 segments) with good visualization of anatomical landmarks was performed.
Liver Cancer - All Symptoms
 
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Subscribe to this channel! http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnhqfPU7sSPi6SLp7bZ6RWQ?sub_confirmation=1 Liver cancer can cause a lot of symptoms. We need to know them, because being aware of their existence is the best way to diagnose liver cancer as soon as possible. Let's see this video that describes all liver cancer symptoms!
Views: 64573 Daniel González M.D.
Giant cavernosum Liver Hemangioma
 
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Resection of a giant Liver Hemangioma 46x23x13 cm. localized at the Right Hepatic lobe. For the resection we followed an open approach operation.
Views: 24767 Vasileios Smyrniotis
Portal Vein Embolization (PVE) for Contralateral Liver Hypertrophy
 
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Removing the bigger right lobe of a cancerous liver may not leave enough liver for the body to survive. In this procedure, doctors shut down each blood vessel near the tumor. As the right lobe slowly dies, the left lobe grows larger (hypertrophies) until it is big enough to provide for the body’s needs. The right lobe can then be removed. © 2009 Neil McMillan in collaboration with the Division of Interventional Radiology and the Department of Art as Applied to Medicine, Johns Hopkins University
Views: 12329 Johns Hopkins Medicine
Liver Cancer UltraSound
 
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Description
Views: 2134 Li Sheeran
Chemoembolization of Right Hepatic Lobe
 
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"A Brilliant Moment in the Field of Interventional Radiology!" The patient is a 59-year-old man with esophageal cancer status post surgical resection with gastric pull through. In 2007, pulmonary and liver metastases were found and the patient underwent chemotherapy. Although the pulmonary lesions responded, he was left with a single liver lesion. He was scheduled for radiofrequency ablation of the liver lesion in 1/09 but CT showed a significant increase in the size of the liver mass from 4 cm to 10 cm. At that point, the plan changed from RFA to chemoembolization of his right hepatic lobe. The patient has excellent functional status and is taking no medications. The team finds it challenging to place the catheter where it can embolize the tumor. What is the appropriate next option? Shawn Samuels, MD, and Michael Gordon, MD from the Baptist Cardiac & Vascular Institute in Miami, FL, performed this case before a live audience at the International Symposium on Endovascular Therapy (ISET) in January 2009. The video includes live discussion with a renowned panel.
Views: 4821 Endovascular.Org
What is Liver Hemangioma? - Dr. Nanda Rajaneesh
 
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Hemangioma as such is a hamartoma and it can be present in any part of the body and it is present in the liver itself. Hamartoma is nothing but the presence of an excessive normal tissue in an abnormal area. That is hemagioma is not supposed to be present in the liver and it is present in the normal tissue. If there is hemagioma in the liver and if it is not troubling the patients, then it can get incidentally detected when they are doing some scans for something else. So if the patient has got hemagioma 8 -10 cm and it is not troubling the patient at all, then nothing to be done. If the hemagioma is large and it is protrude outside the stomach, then it is possible that and trauma on the stomach can lead to the rupture of the hemagioma, which can be life threatening to the individual. So before it becomes life threatening for the patient. So it is advisable to get it operated, when it is more than 10 cms in size. If the individual is HAG positive along with hemagioma, they do not require any extra treatment. So just leave it if it is not troubling the individual.
Dr. Yao on the Milan Criteria in Liver Cancer
 
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Francis Yao, MD, professor of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, medical director of the Liver Transplant Program at UCSF Medical Center, discusses the Milan criteria in liver cancer. In the past, oncologists tended to transplant bulky tumors and would often see a significant amount of recurrence in their patients, says Yao. The Milan criteria, which were published in 1996, state that a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is selected for transplantation when he or she has a single lesion up to 5 centimeters, or 2 to 3 lesions up to 3 centimeters. After the Milan criteria became a benchmark for the treatment of patients with HCC, some oncologists began to question whether the size or number of lesions could be expanded. Research suggested that patients with tumor sizes just beyond the Milan criteria may see very positive outcomes, according to Yao. UCSF proposed an updated set of criteria, which expanded the upper limit of the tumor size by 1.5 centimeters, or up to 3 nodules with the largest lesion up to 4.5 centimeters.
Views: 154 OncLiveTV
Abdomen: Liver: Carcinoid tumor: Carcinoid tumor in left lobe of liver invades the splenic vein
 
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Carcinoid tumor: Carcinoid tumor in left lobe of liver invades the splenic vein: Sequence of images in 3D using both VRT and MIP defines the invasiveness of the tumor and the extensive collaterals in the gastric fundus and epiploic vessels
Views: 3090 CTisus
cancer ovary metastasis liver peritoneum abdomen squamous carcinoma hepatic www.drtomar.com
 
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Cancer Left Ovary metastasis to Liver and Peritoneal cavity, -------------------------------- This is a video Testimonial by Ms. Aiman Tabassum Quereshi d/o Mr. Mohammed Shafi Quereshi, previousely living in Dewas, M.P., India now.transfered to Chindwara, working as a cleark in Registrar office Chindwara, Mobile No. +919826324855. ------------------------ Aiman Had been suffering from acute abdominal pains in May-June 2011 when she underwent Ultra Sonography Abdomen to find out a big sized germ cell pelvic mass tumor involving the left ovary.------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ The tumor was excised at Nagpur, Maharashtra, India on 15th July 2011. It was a big sized tumor weighing 5 Kgs and the size of the tumor was 17 x 16 cms. The doctors sent it for Biopsy and then descided to undergo six sessions of chemotherapy.------------ After four courses of chemotherapy a whole body PET CT was done at Aurobindo Hospital, Indore to fine further increase of the disease with metastasis to Liver ( multiple lesions ) 1st SOL size 2.6 x 1.6 cms in the Right lobe, 2nd SOL size 1.6 x 0.9 cms in the subcapscular region of inferior right lobe of Liver, 3rd SOL 3.2 x 2.7 cms anteror to and inseperable from the descending colon, 4th and the 5th SOLs of similar sizes seen abutting the sigmoid colon and many subcentimetric paraaortic and mesenteric nodes were noted.------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Parents of Aiman were shocked to find this leaping progress of the disease inspite of completion of 4 chemotherapy sessions, they gave up all treatment and did not go for the remaining two more chemotherapies feelin very low and finding the girl suffering after every chenotherapy.------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Then they were suggested to meet Dr. Tomar and take Homeopathy medicines for their suffering child, they contacted Dr Tomar in January 2012 and started treatment, they refraind from taking the remaining two chemotherapy sessions for fear of torture and suffering that heris child had to bear during the first four chemotherapies with no result.-- after Eight months of treatment a Ultrasonographic examination of the Whole Abdomen miraculosly revealed that all the SOL's and nodes have completly vanished and Aiman is feeling fantastic, has started attending her school once again which she was not able to go previousely, and is in a very good state of health. Her (AFP) Alfafetoprotein.had gone up to the value of 48,000 before the opearation has gradually reduced to 22,000 and then suddenly it has come down miraculously to 6 and then to 2.63. ( The normal value of AFP being below 11.0 ).------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Case presented by: Dr (Prof.) Ajay Singh Tomar Homeopath. Website: www.drtomar.com , email: astomar@drtomar.com , Tel: +91-98930-29893, +91-731-4061911 , address: F-21, Scheme No: 54, Vijay Nagar, Indore, M.P. Pin 452010. Key words: Cancer, Liver, Hepato, Hepatic, Homeopathy, Homoeopathy, Carcinoma, Ovary, peritoneum, "www.drtomar.com", "astomar@drtomar.com", "Dr. Tomar", "Homeopathy in Indore", "Homeopathy in India", "Alternative medicine", "Cancer in Homeopathy", "Homeopathy in Cancer", "Homeopathy and Cancer"' "Cancer and Homeopathy".
Views: 1986 doctortomar
synchronous colon cancer and large liver metastasis: curative resection
 
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This video shares our experience with curative treatment in a patient with synchronous sigmoid colon cancer and large liver metastasis involving whole right lobe and segment 4. The patient underwent laparoscopic colon resection and right portal vein ligation to induce liver segments 2-3 hypertrophy in preparation for liver right trisectionectomy. Since the desired future liver remnant volume had still not been achieved after completion of post-surgery 3-cycle chemotherapy, the liver phase was managed with ALPPS (Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy) procedure.
Views: 1746 M Fatih Can
What Is A Liver Cyst?
 
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Learn more: "Liver Disease: 101 What You Need to Know about Fatty Liver, Liver Detox and Liver Diet (Liver Health - Liver Detox - Liver Disease - Liver Failure - Fatty Liver." Click on http://amzn.to/1Ln2IXt. Also see "Dr. Melissa Palmer's Guide To Hepatitis and Liver Disease." http://amzn.to/1MCnnrS. This short video describes what a liver cyst is and how it forms.
Views: 25796 WS Westwood
CT scan - Lung cancer
 
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My mom (age:64) Asian diagnosed with lung cancer. Summary: She is diagnosed with Stage IV lung cancer with rib cage bone metastasis. X-ray, CT on Thorax and Adomen, MRI on spine, blood test, Sputum cytology taken. CT scan show diffused nodules on both lung with consolidation on the upper left lobe. MRI shows compression fracture on T9 and T12 and minor press on spinal code. Blood test shows elevation of CEA tumor marker, 50x of normal reading. Sputum cytology suspect of Adenocarcinomas. Treatments: She has RT therapy for 2 weeks to treat the back pain followed by a week rest before Iressa intake for 6 days. Before the Iressa, she is on oxygen support but she is able to put it off for hours. After the iressa, she relied on the oxygen support more heavily and still breathless. There is an acute onset of dyspnea or worsening of the breathlessness, with cough and fever. She is under antibiotic and cough mixture to control the lung infection. Diagnosis (details) before treatment: Radiograph of the chest - There are extensive patchy confluent parenchymal opacities in both lungs with a larger opacity in the left upper/mid lung (measuring 3 x 4 cm); these are likely of infectious etiology. An underlying mass in the left upper/mid lung cannot be excluded. There are no pleural effusions. The heart size is within normal limits.Mild degenerative changes of the spine are noted. Blood Test: Alphafetoprotein 13 ug/L (0-9 normal) CEA 252 ug/L (0-5 normal) CA125 15 U/mL (0-35 normal) CA19-9 12 U/mL (0-35 normal) Sputum cytology - Atypical cells suspicious of adenocarcinoma (3ml of bloodstained mucoid fluid was used, 4 slides examined show a moderate cell yield. Atypical cells showing enlarged nuclei with coarse chromatin and pleomorphic nucleoli are noted. The cytoplasm are vacuolated. Microorganism and inflammatory cells including neutrophils and lymphocytes are noted in the background) CT THORAX AND ABDOMEN IV contrast-enhanced multi-slice contiguous axial sections of the thorax and abdomen were obtained. Total 90 ml of intravenous Omnipaque 350 were administered as contrast medium. Comparison was made with previous study dated 05/02/07. Diffuse subcentimeter nodules are seen in both lungs with areas of coalescence. Collapse consolidation of the anterior segment of the left upper lobe with some heterogeneous enhancement near the hilum. There is no pleural effusion detected. The tracheobronchial tree is unremarkable. Enlarged right paratracheal, pertracheal, subcarinal and bilateral hilar lymph nodes are noted. A few right supraclavicular and left axillary lymph nodes are also seen. The mediastinal vessels, cardiac chambers show normal opacification. The visualized thoracic aorta is of normal caliber with no significant thrombus formation. The liver is enlarged and again shows multiple large cysts. Mild interval increase in size of the segment 6 cyst now measuring 10.3x8.3 cm. This is seen displacing the right kidney inferiorly. No suspicious focal lesion is seen. The hepatic and portal vessels show normal enhancement. The biliary tree is not dilated. Gallstones are seen. No evidence of cholecystitis. The visualized pancreas, spleen, kidneys, adrenals and opacified bowel loops are unremarkable. Multiple sclerotic foci are noted along the sternum, thoracolumbar and sacral spine compatible with mestastasis. Compression fracture of T9 vertebral bodies noted. Metastatic body lesions involving the left scapula, right 6th, left 4th, 9th and 10th ribs are noted. Comment: - Collapse of the anterior segment of the left upper lobe with some heterogeneous enhancement near the hilum. Underlying malignancy cannot be excluded. Bronchoscopic biopsy is suggested. - The pulmonary nodules in both lungs are suggestive of metastasis. - Mediastinal lumphadenopathy - Diffuse bony metastasis as described above. - Hepatic cysts, the one in segment 6 showing mild interval increase in size. - Gallstones.
Views: 79743 kslow99
Happy Outcomes for Cancer Patients #19 Liver Cancer
 
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Happy Outcomes for Cancer Patients #19 Liver Cancer These case reports are about actual cancer patients with aggressive cancer who used specific nutrition, detoxification, and pancreatic enzymes to recover and survive much longer than seen in conventional cancer treatment. The cases are from “One Man Alone: An Investigation of Nutrition, Cancer, and William Donald Kelley” by Dr. Nicholas J. Gonzalez. 1987, 2010 New Spring Press. The research was performed under authority of Dr. Robert A. Good, MD, PhD, Director of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Patient #19 was a 69 year old female. Diagnosed with carcinoma to the liver, metastatic from unknown primary. She survived six years after diagnosis and died in her sleep September 1980. Mid 1973 she noticed a painless right mass on right side of abdomen. 1973-74 the mass enlarged and became painful. Symptoms included fatigue, weight loss, and anorexia. October 1974 she was admitted to Lancaster General Hospital. Diagnosis was “very large abdominal mass in the mid abdomen and upper left quadrant.” “A large intrehapatic mass localized predominantly in left lobe of the liver…measures at least 12 cm. across…in addition, there some echoes in right lobe of liver.” Exploratory surgery showed metastatic cancer seen throughout the liver. She was biopsied but the cancer was too extensive for resection (removal). “A liver full of metastatic disease was discovered.” Doctors proposed chemotherapy that might prolong life a few months. She completed a five day course of 5-fluorouracil. She was discharged very unstable, and planned to continue chemo. November 1974 Patient #19 learned of Dr. Kelley, consulted with him and began program. She responded very quickly with improved energy and appetite. Within months, the large abdominal tumors regressed completely. Patient #19 folowed Dr. Kelley’s program for five years. Nutrition, detoxification, and pancreatic enzymes. In 1980 she discontinued program believing herself cured. September 1980 Patient #19 died peacefully in her sleep, six years after diagnosis with terminal disease. Dr. Kelley believed that if she had continued the program she would still be alive. Cancer metastatic to the liver is deadly, particularly when coming from unknown primary. “Liver metastases are considered by most doctors to be incurable.” 20 years intensive research effort showed that neither systemic nor intra-arterial chemotherapy, alone or with radiation, offer much benefit. 60% one-year survival for solitary, untreated metastases from colon and rectal carcinoma. 5.7% one-year survival when both lobes of liver contain widespread disease. Mean survival for this group was only 3.1 months. If you have cancer: Relying on the cancer treatment industry is risky. They are focused on shrinking tumors, not on restoring health. Conventional Cancer treatment Chemo and radiation cause cancer. Surgery (and biopsies) spread cancer. Consider your responsibilities to yourself and to your family. Are you doing everything possible to restore your health and immune system to survive cancer and live a long, happy, healthy life? To survive and thrive after a cancer diagnosis you must establish these foundations of health and vitality: 1. Optimal Body pH, the acid/alkaline balance. 2. Balance hormones. 3. Detoxify the body, mind, and emotions. 4. Eliminate infections, including subclinical and drug resistant. 5. Rejuvenate depleted organs, glands, and systems. 6. Use the most appropriate and proven cancer fighting nutrition. If you have cancer, Get Help! Call 907-272-6299 Dr. James J. Pizzadili, D.C., M.S., F.I.C.A. HealthPro Alaska, LLC 545 West Fireweed Lane Anchorage, Alaska 99503 www.HealthProAK.com
Views: 305 Dr. Pizzadili
ALPPS and simultaneous colectomy in multiple CRCLM
 
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This video demonstrated associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy(ALPPS) and simultaneous colectomy. An elderly woman had been given neoadjuvant chemotherapy for sigmoid colonic cancer and 19 metastatic lesions in liver. I demonstrated simultaneous colectomy and five non-anatomical resection of left lobe of liver with liver partition and right portal vein ligation. CT scan after 12 days of surgery revealed increased in size of left lobe of liver. Later, I performed extended right hepatectomy for completion of 2nd stage of ALPPS on postoperative day 14th without complication. Simultaneous ALPPS and colectomy is feasible for selective patient. ROYALTY FREE MUSIC by BENSOUND https://www.bensound.com/royalty-free...
Views: 249 Tharatip Srisuk
Elegant demonstration of  liver cancer (HCC)  chemoembolization ( TACE) using two drugs.
 
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A small but significant 2.5 cm HCC in sub phrenic location is difficult to visualise. Chemoembolization with lipidiol and chemotherapeutic drugs can be very useful to started the treatment of HCC and make the lesion radio-opaque . This CT hyperdensity is very handy for Radio frequency ablation. (RFa).
US-Cut: Interactive Liver tumor segmentations in an Ultrasound image
 
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Interactive Liver tumor segmentations in an Ultrasound image (credit to Alexander Hann). Abstract: Ultrasound is the most commonly used liver imaging modality worldwide and plays an important role in follow-up of cancer patients with liver metastases. We present an interactive segmentation approach for liver tumors in US acquisitions, which is very challenging, because of the low image quality and contrast between tumors and surrounding tissue. To cover typical clinical acquisitions, the approach was evaluated with hyperechoic (brighter), hypoechoic (darker) or isoechoic tumors (similar) compared to surrounding tissue. Due to the approach’s interactive real-time behavior, it was even possible in difficult cases to find satisfying tumor segmentations within seconds and without parameter settings. For more information, please see the corresponding publication: J. Egger, P. Voglreiter, M. Dokter, M. Hofmann, X. Chen, W. G. Zoller, D. Schmalstieg, A. Hann “US-Cut: interactive algorithm for rapid detection and segmentation of liver tumors in ultrasound acquisitions“ In: Proceedings of SPIE Medical Imaging Conference, Paper 9790-47, San Diego, USA, Feb. 2016. http://spie.org/Publications/Proceedings/Paper/10.1117/12.2216509
Views: 5358 Jan Egger
liver cancer के सामान्‍य लक्षण||liver cancer treatment
 
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liver cancer के सामान्‍य लक्षण||liver cancer treatment Subscribe To My Channel Now For More Stuff 👇👇 Health care in hindi https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmNhhIZ0VchVdrV3EKizL7g I declare that all slideshow belong me. Photos all are taken from Google Image search and using advanced image search option.All images were fairly used during the making of this video for entertainment purposes. We do not mean to victimize anybody emotionally. Thanks to Google for providing this beautiful and related pictures. IMAGES CREDIT: GOOGLE SOURCE Information has been collected from google source Every information is taken from google & Sources. Thanks to google for the information. Source: Google Search Music: http://www.bensound.com
Views: 176120 Dimag Ki Batti Jalao
Liver Anatomy - Ligaments, Lobes (Easy to Understand)
 
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The gross anatomy of the liver explained in a very simple way.
Views: 27780 Minass
Liver Lesions - Dr. Joel Wallach
 
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Views: 5801 M Medeiros
Laparoscopic removal of a Liver Cyst  (keyhole surgery)
 
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Main points of the laparoscopic removal of a liver cyst by Consultant Surgeon Mr. P.Antoniou
Views: 44361 John Yannopapas
Gall bladder in the left lobe of Liver
 
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Gall Bladder in left lobe of Liver
Views: 64 Dr. Fakhrul Islam
Liver Tumor
 
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Liver tumors or hepatic tumors are tumors or growths on or in the liver (medical terms pertaining to the liver often start in hepato- or hepatic from the Greek word for liver, hepar). Several distinct types of tumors can develop in the liver because the liver is made up of various cell types. These growths can be benign or malignant (cancerous). They may be discovered on medical imaging (even for a different reason than the cancer itself), or may be present in patients as an abdominal mass, hepatomegaly, abdominal pain, jaundice, or some other liver dysfunction. To Read the Compelete Description Visit: http://cancers-101.blogspot.com/2013/08/liver-tumor.html Blog Link : http://www.cancers-101.blogspot.com Do not Forget to Subscribe..
Views: 115 Hassan Nawaz
14 early warning signs that cancer is growing in your body
 
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DISCLAIMER ON COMMENTS & ADVICE GIVEN Please note that the below information is designed to provide general information on the topics presented. It is provided with the understanding that the expert is not engaged in rendering any medical or professional services in the information provided below. The information provided should not be used as a substitute for professional services. 14 early warning signs that cancer is growing in your body Here are signs that are commonly ignored: 1. Wheezing or shallow breathing If you ask lung cancer patients what the first thing they noticed was, the majority would say it was their difficulty with breathing, or trouble catching their breath. 2. Chronic coughing or pain in the chest area Chest pain, incessant coughing, and even pain that reaches down the arms are symptoms of leukemia and lung tumors. 3. Frequently having fevers or infections White blood cells help our body to fight off infections and foreign invaders. Leukemia is a type of blood cell cancer that begins in bone marrow and causes the body to produce abnormal white blood cells, which reduces the effectiveness of its ability to fight infections. 4. Trouble with swallowing If you have difficulty swallowing, you may want to get checked for preliminary esophageal or throat cancer. It is also associated with lung cancer as well. 5. Lymph nodes that are swollen or lumps on the skin of your neck, underarm, or groin Any drastic changes in your lymphatic system should be carefully observed. These changes could be warning signs of lymphatic cancer. 6. Over-bruising and excessive bleeding When platelets and red blood cells act abnormally, there becomes excessive bruising and bleeding. This symptom can be a sign of leukemia. 7. Constant fatigue Feeling weakness in your body, and constant fatigue are symptoms of several different kinds of cancer. You’ll need to examine these symptoms in conjunction with other ones as well. As a general rule, if you ever feel exhasuted to where you can barely move without any physical reason, see your doctor. 8. Bloating in the abdomen or localized weight gain Women with ovarian cancer reported having “inexplicable abdominal bloating.” They said this bloating and weight gain happened suddenly, and appeared, disappeared, and reappeared for a long time. 9. Loss of appetite and feeling full This symptom is a warning sign for ovarian cancer as well. A vast majority of women said they “just couldn’t eat,” even if it had been a while since their last meal. 10. Pain the pelvis or abdominal area Leukemia and ovarian cancer can cause abdominal and pelvic pain. 11. Bleeding from the rectum or blood in stool This is a symptom commonly found in those diagnosed with colon cancer. If you ever notice blood in your stool, it is advisable to schedule a visit to your physician. 12. Rapid and unexplained weight loss Rapidly losing weight is a warning sign of digestive and colon cancers. It is also a sign that cancer has infected the liver. It you lose your appetite and stop producing a normal amount of waste, see your doctor.. 13. Digestive pain or stomachache having stomach cramps or frequent upset stomach pain may indicate colon or stomach cancer. 14. A red, sore, or swollen breast These are signs of breast cancer and should be examined by a physician. 15. Changes to the nipple If the nipple starts to look flattened, inverted, or turned sideways, see your doctor about possible breast cancer. Women diagnosed with breast cancer say the first thing they noticed was the changes to their nipples. 16. Abnormally heavy or painful periods/Bleeding in between cycles Several women say this is the number one symptom of endometrial or uterine cancer. Request a transvaginal ultrasound if your menstrual cycle has any significant changes. 17. Puffiness in the face Lung cancer patients report noticing “puffiness, swelling, or redness” in the face. This happens because lung tumors tend to block blood vessels, which stops oxygenated blood from flowing to your neck and face. 18. A sore that doesn’t heal Get to know the various kinds of skin cancer. Melanoma, basal cell carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma are three common types. Check your skin for odd growths or spots. 19. Changes in fingernails Liver cancer, skin cancer, and lung cancer all show warning signs through the finger nails. Black spots, or lines, whitening and thickening around the edges, and “clubbing” are all signs you should pay attention to. 20. Pain localized in the lumbar spine or lower right side Several patients diagnose with liver and breast cancer cancer report this as one of their first signs. Regardless if you are a male or a female, it’s vital to pay attention to any abnormal changes in your body, as well as your energy levels. This will help to detect any signs of cancer while it’s still early. The faster you realize something isn’t quite right, the faster you can start to take the proper steps to heal your body.
Views: 2840912 Natural Remedies
Portal Vein Thrombosis:  Medical and Surgical Consideration - UCSF Liver Transplant Conference 2014
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) UCSF Liver Transplant Conference 2014: Part Seven, Portal Vein Thrombosis: Medical and Surgical Consideration. Jennifer Price, MD and Sang-Mo Kang, MD relate how PVT increases post-transplant mortality. Questions include: how common is PVT in cirrhosis? What is the impact on transplant outcomes? What are optimal management methods? Can PVT be prevented? Series: "UCSF Transplant Update" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 29267]
Radical Surgery of Liver Tumors Involving Hepatic Venous Outflow...
 
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Radical Surgery of Liver Tumors Involving Hepatic Venous Outflow With and Without Hipothermic Protection E. Vicente1, Y. Quijano1, B. Ielpo1, H. Duran1, E. Diaz1, I. Fabra1, R. Puga1, C. Oliva1, R. Caruso1, V. Ferri1, J. Plaza1, B. Alvarez1, S. Olivares1 ; 1Sanchinarro University Hospital, Madrid, MADRID Presented at the 2013 AHPBA Annual Meeting
Views: 22676 AHPBA
Right Hepatectomy for right lobe Hepatoblastoma in a child by Dr Hitesh Chavda
 
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Right Hepatectomy for right lobe Hepatoblastoma in a child by Dr Hitesh Chavda
Views: 10465 Saket Singhi
Extended left hepatectomy for hilar cholangiocarcinoma
 
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This is a case of Klatskin tumor we treated with extended left hepatectomy. Since the patient had the liver segment 7 artery coming from the right anterior sector arterial supply, parts of liver segments 5 and 8 (and also segment 7 arterial blood flow) was preserved to avoid inadequate functional liver remnant. The procedure required two separate bilioenteric anastomoses for anterior and posterior sector bile ducts of each.
Views: 4261 M Fatih Can
Total laparoscopic resection of large hepatic caudate lobe liver cancer
 
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Total laparoscopic resection of large hepatic caudate lobe liver cancer. come from:http://www.surgbbs.com/
Views: 108 Operation john
LiVac left lobe of liver retraction
 
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Brief video demonstrating retraction of the left lobe of liver with the LiVac Retractor during the First In Human Trial conducted in 2013 (not currently commercially available as of March 2014). The LiVac is an alternative to the Nathanson retractor, but can also be used for right lobe retraction (cholecystectomy). It is suitable for reduced port or single port laparoscopic surgery. I am the inventor of the LiVac Retractor and LiVac Slng, and Director / Chief Medical Officer of Livac Pty Ltd. Dr Philip Gan
Views: 429 Philip Gan
right and left lobes of liver
 
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pull back diaphragm to see more clearly
Views: 163 Chesttteeerrr
Left lobe living donor liver transplantation by Prof. Dr Hossam Soliman M.D.
 
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Left lobe liver transplantation, my standard technique
Views: 373 Hossam Soliman
liver cyst simple in Lt lobe of liver
 
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by Dr Tahir A Siddqui ( consultant sonologist ) at Gujranwala, Pakistan COMMENTS , IDEAS, CORRECTION, GUIDANCE, LIKES / DISLIKES shall be highly appreciated.
Yttrium-90 | Dr Tony Talebi discusses Yttrium-90 Radioembolization with Dr Salsamendi
 
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http://www.hemonc101.com - Yttrium-90 Radioembolization. Dr Tony Talebi discusses Yttrium-90 Radioembolization with Dr Salsamendi. For further discussion visit www.HemOnc101.com What is Yttrium-90 Radioembolization? Yttrium-90 microsphere radioembolization is an FDA approved, non-surgical procedure used to treat inoperable liver cancer and liver metastases. This innovative procedure delivers targeted, internal radiation therapy directly to the tumor. With yttrium-90 microsphere radioembolization, a catheter is inserted through a tiny incision in the groin and threaded through the arteries until it reaches the hepatic artery. The hepatic artery is one of two blood vessels that feed the liver and the one that usually supplies blood to the tumors. Once the catheter is properly placed in the hepatic artery, millions of tiny beads, or microspheres, which contain the radioactive element yttrium-90, are released into the blood stream. These microspheres lodge into the smaller blood vessels that feed the tumor. In addition to preventing blood flow to the tumor, the microspheres emit radiation that destroys the cancerous cells. The radiation only penetrates approximately 1/16" of tissue, so very little healthy liver tissue is affected by the radiation. Due to the targeted nature of this approach, it can deliver a much more potent dose of radiation than conventional radiation therapy. The radiation in the yttrium-90 continually decreases over a 2 week period, at which time the radiation is essentially gone. With Yttrium-90 microsphere radioembolization the whole liver can be treated in one session in most cases. In some instances the right and left lobes of the liver may need to be treated separately, with one month between the treatments. A trial run and mapping procedure is performed one week before the administration of the actual treatment dose to block off vessels that go outside of the liver (e.g. to the stomach) and to perform a test dose to prove that the majority of the dose will stay in the liver and not pass through to the lungs.ne. The microspheres will remain in the liver without causing any complications. Here, Dr. Tony Talebi discusses the general concepts of what is Yttrium 90 Radioembolization with Dr. Jason Salsamendi, assistant professor of interventional radiology at the University of Miami. Dr. Salsamendi credentials: Assistant Professor Clinical Radiology Board Certifications American Board of Radiology-Diagnostic Radiology Education New York University Medical Center New York, NY USA Fellowship - Vascular Interventional 2010 Albert Einstein College of Medicine - Jacobi Medical Center New York, NY USA Residency 2009 Mount Sinai School of Medicine - Queens Hospital Center New York, NY USA Internship 2005 University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Coral Gables, FL USA MD 2004 University of Miami Coral Gables, FL USA BS 2000
Views: 3637 Tony Talebi
EUS-FNA of an hepatic mass
 
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EUS FNA of an hepatocarcinoma of the left lobe in a patient with cirrhosis with small quantity of ascites.
Views: 271 Georgios Mavrogenis