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Latinos Are Hit Exceptional Hard By Opioids In Massachusetts
 
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http://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2018/05/03/latino-opioid-overdose-deaths
Views: 3539 Lisa Cabrera
Every Town Research For More Information
 
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https://everytownresearch.org/school-shootings/5955/
Views: 3181 Lisa Cabrera
Prescription: Nutrition Episode 3 - Spilling the Beans
 
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I team up with chef Rich Landau and public health nutritionist Tracye McQuirter to discuss the health benefits and preparation of beans. Subscribe to Dr. Greger’s free nutrition newsletter at http://www.nutritionfacts.org/subscribe and get a free excerpt from his latest NYT Bestseller HOW NOT TO DIE. (All proceeds Dr. Greger receives from his books, DVDs, and speaking directly support NutritionFacts.org). I was approached by CuriosityStream, a new on-demand streaming service for documentaries and non-fiction programming created by Discovery Channel founder John Hendricks, about doing a 4-part series on healthy eating. I agreed if they would offer at least limited time access to the series for free. You may remember seeing the first episode on NutritionFacts.org over this past year, and they are now letting us share this one, the 3rd. The other three episodes of Prescription: Nutrition are available to watch now on CuriosityStream for free, but you have to sign up for a 30-day trial. If you don’t want to continue the trial make sure to cancel before the 30 days or they’ll start charging you. To access the 30-day trial, visit https://www.CuriosityStream.com and use the special code NUTRITION. This offer must be redeemed by December 31st, 2018. How did this all come about? Elizabeth North, president and CEO of CuriosityStream (https://www.curiositystream.com/), began her own journey toward plant-based eating when she was struggling with some health scares. She saw immediate benefits. “I realized astounding improvements in my health (and surprisingly, my fitness) from eating so many fresh fruits and vegetables,” she said. “Not only did I start consuming mass quantities of plant-based foods, but I also began consuming books, from The China Study to Eat To Live to Dr. Greger’s How Not To Die. The authors had differing perspectives on diet, but all experts agreed that adding more fresh fruits and vegetables is the first step to improving your nutrition and your overall health.” The episodes in the series are: Ep1 – Green Revolution Ep2 – Grain of Truth Ep3 – Spilling the Beans Ep4 – Nature’s Candy For more overview-type videos, see my introductory video series: • Why You Should Care About Nutrition (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/why-you-should-care-about-nutrition) • Taking Personal Responsibility for Your Health (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/Taking-Personal-Responsibility-for-Your-Health) • The Story of NutritionFacts.org (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-story-of-nutritionfacts-org/) • The Philosophy of NutritionFacts.org (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/The-Philosophy-of-NutritionFacts-org) • Behind the Scenes at NutritionFacts.org (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/Behind-the-Scenes-at-NutritionFacts-org) • How Not to Die from Heart Disease (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-not-to-die-from-heart-disease/) • How Not to Die from Cancer (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-not-to-die-from-cancer/) • How Not to Die from Diabetes (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-not-to-die-from-diabetes/) • How Not to Die from Kidney Disease (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-not-to-die-from-kidney-disease/) • How Not to Die from High Blood Pressure (https://nutritionfacts.org/how-not-to-die-from-high-blood-pressure) And to see the top foods I recommend eating, check out my Daily Dozen Checklist (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/dr-gregers-daily-dozen-checklist/). Have a question about this video? Leave it in the comment section at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/prescription-nutrition-episode-3-spilling-the-beans and someone on the NutritionFacts.org team will try to answer it. Want to get a list of links to all the scientific sources used in this video? Click on Sources Cited at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/prescription-nutrition-episode-3-spilling-the-beans. You’ll also find a transcript and acknowledgments for the video, my blog and speaking tour schedule, and an easy way to search (by translated language even) through our videos spanning more than 2,000 health topics. If you’d rather watch these videos on YouTube, subscribe to my YouTube Channel here: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=nutritionfactsorg Thanks for watching. I hope you’ll join in the evidence-based nutrition revolution! -Michael Greger, MD FACLM Captions for this video are available in several languages. To find yours, click on the settings wheel on the lower-right of the video and then "Subtitles/CC." http://www.NutritionFacts.org • Subscribe: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/subscribe • Donate: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/donate • HOW NOT TO DIE: http://nutritionfacts.org/book • Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NutritionFacts.org • Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/nutrition_facts • Instagram: http://instagram.com/nutrition_facts_org/ • Google+: https://plus.google.com/+NutritionfactsOrgMD • Podcast : http://nutritionfacts.org/audio/
Views: 135774 NutritionFacts.org
2017 Public Health Ethics Forum
 
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The 2017 Public Health Ethics Forum, "Optimal Health for Her Whole Life," focuses on a range of health issues and actions to improve the health of women and girls in the United States. The National Center for Bioethics in Research and Health Care at Tuskegee University and the Office of Minority Health and Health Equity at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) host this annual event. This year's forum explores ways to promote and protect women's health across the lifespan by emphasizing public health ethics in the practice of public health. Comments on this video are allowed in accordance with our comment policy: http://www.cdc.gov/SocialMedia/Tools/CommentPolicy.html This video can also be viewed at https://www.cdc.gov/minorityhealth/ethicsforum/2017/videos/2017_PHEF_video_LowRes.mp4
Isiah Thomas ((NBA All-Time Great) visits @pbhood "Project Brotherhood Power Hour" TV
 
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"Project Brotherhood Power Hour" TV with ((NBA All-Time Great)) Isiah Thomas on Soul 106.3fm Chicago PB Doctors answers caller's question via radio. Please Subscribe to Support.... http://www.youtube.com/user/ProjectBrotherhoodTV Isiah Lord Thomas III (born April 30, 1961), nicknamed "Zeke", is a retired American basketball player who played professionally for the Detroit Pistons in the National Basketball Association (NBA). The 12-time NBA All-Star was named one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History and was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Thomas has also been a professional and collegiate head coach, a basketball executive, and a broadcaster. Thomas played collegiately for the Indiana University Hoosiers. He went on to play professionally as point guard for the Pistons from 1981 until 1994 and led the "Bad Boys" to NBA championships in the 1988--89 and 1989--90 seasons. After his playing career, he was an executive with the Toronto Raptors, a television commentator, an executive with the Continental Basketball Association, head coach of the Indiana Pacers, and an executive and head coach for the New York Knicks. He was later the men's basketball coach for the Florida International University (FIU) Golden Panthers for three seasons from 2009 to 2012. Project Brotherhood (PB) has developed a community based outreach and prevention program for African American men (AAM) residing in the Woodlawn and other surrounding south side communities of Chicago, Illinois. With this model we have created a "safe" place for Black men to come and seek services. Project Brotherhood goals are to increase the health awareness in black men, with PB's definition of health being: complete physical, mental, social, economic and spiritual well being. Project Brotherhood's mission is to increase the health awareness in Black men by training Black men & providing preventive health messages & literature in a cultural & gender specific way (age specific when necessary). With this new awareness Black men are more likely to go for health screening and testing. This may lead to an early diagnosis and PB knows Black men die from disease due to late or "no" diagnosis at all. Whether it is on the baseball field, basketball court, or just hanging on the corner, Project Brotherhood has become a trusted source of health information and services for men on the south side of Chicago. Project Brotherhood has presented its program and research at a wide variety of professional conferences. We have been honored with the James Wright Award from the National Association of Public Hospitals and have received numerous positive attentions from the press. The Center for Disease Control has recognized Project Brotherhood as an outstanding program that can help reduce health inequities. Project Brotherhood was featured in an installment of CNN's Black in America. BLACK MEN'S HEALTH FACT SHEET Homicide is the leading cause of death for African American men between the ages of 18 and 34 HIV/AIDS is the third leading cause of death for Black men aged 25-44 Even though African Americans account for 13% of the US population they account for 49% of HIV/AIDS cases The life expectancy for Black men at birth in Chicago is eight years less than the National averageBlack men have a 20% higher incidence and a 40% higher death rate from all cancer combined than white men Black men have the highest death rate of all racial/ethnic groups, male or female Ten percent of African American Men between the ages of 18 and 34 were in prison in 2005. This is seven times the rate of non-Hispanic White men. Prisoners reentering the community have difficulty obtaining stable employment, adequate housing and health coverage. 5 leading causes of death (In no particular order) HIV Homicide Cardiovascular diseases Unintentional injuries Cancer
Views: 1995 ProjectBrotherhoodTV
The Health of Women of Color: A Critical Intersection at the Corner of Sex/Gender and Race/Ethnicity
 
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On September 23, 2014, the Committee on Women of Color in Biomedical Careers and the Office of Research on Women’s Health hosted a symposium session at the 2014 NIH Research Festival on the health of women of color. As the data in the recently released Women of Color Health Data Book (4th Edition) illustrates, complex racial/ethnic disparities exist between populations of women and across different stages of the lifespan. Six researchers from across NIH joined the panel to discuss findings from health studies that address critical race, ethnicity, sex, and/or gender intersections that can affect disease risk and therapeutic response. Opening remarks were given by Janine Clayton, MD and Marie Bernard, MD. The panelists included: Lauren Wood, MD; Nakela Cook MD, MPH, FACC; Salman Tajuddin, PhD; Gina Brown, MD; Tamara Harris MD, MS; and Dr. Tiffany Powell-Wiley, MD, MPH.
Views: 614 NIHOD
2018 Black History Month Observance
 
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For more information visit: https://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/ -- U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) http://www.hhs.gov HHS Privacy Policy http://www.hhs.gov/Privacy.html
A Primer in Racial Ethnic Disparities in Healthcare and Outcomes
 
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LeRoi S. Hicks, M.D., MPH Vice Chair, Department of Medicine LeRoi S. Hicks, M.D., MPH is a doctor, researcher, and educator at Christiana Care Health System and serves at the vice chair of the Department of Medicine. Dr. Hicks graduated cum laude from Howard University in Washington D.C. with a B.S. in medical technology and obtained his medical degree at Indiana University. His postdoctoral training includes fellowships in internal medicine at the Harvard Medical School, and the Women’s Hospital in Boston, as well as a research fellowship at the Harvard Medical School. Dr. Hicks has served on the faculty at Harvard Medical School as an instructor in medicine, and after returning to Harvard as a student to earn his master’s in public health in 2001, continued there as a lecturer in health policy. In addition to his clinical and professorial work, Dr. Hicks is also an active editor and reviewer of several medical publications. He is the deputy editor of Medical Care, and a reviewer of the Journal of General Internal Medicine, the American Journal of Managed Care and the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved. His scholarly work is extensive and has been published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, the American Journal of Medicine and the Journal of Urban Health. Before joining Christiana Care, Dr. Hicks served as the chief of the division of hospital medicine at the University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center in Worcester, Mass.
Views: 237 DE-CTR ACCEL
Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center
 
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http://Facebook.com/CagigasMedicalCenter Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center explains how our gut bacteria affects us or benefit us. In Palm Beach Gardens obesity is a huge problem which we all should correct. This video is presented by Special English Health Report to educate us on how we could prevent obesity in our west palm beach gardens community. Below you will know all statics of obese individuals reports by: http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/adult.html Adult Obesity Facts Obesity is common, serious and costly More than one-third of U.S. adults (35.7%) are obese. Obesity-related conditions include heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer, some of the leading causes of preventable death. In 2008, medical costs associated with obesity were estimated at $147 billion; the medical costs for people who are obese were $1,429 higher than those of normal weight. Obesity affects some groups more than others Non-Hispanic blacks have the highest age-adjusted rates of obesity (49.5%) compared with Mexican Americans (40.4%), all Hispanics (39.1%) and non-Hispanic whites (34.3%) Obesity and socioeconomic status Among non-Hispanic black and Mexican-American men, those with higher incomes are more likely to be obese than those with low income. Higher income women are less likely to be obese than low-income women.There is no significant relationship between obesity and education among men. Among women, however, there is a trend—those with college degrees are less likely to be obese compared with less educated women. Between 1988--1994 and 2007--2008 the prevalence of obesity increased in adults at all income and education levels. New baseline established in 2011 for state Obesity rates: Changes to the CDC's BRFSS and to exclusion criteria result in a new baseline for estimated state adult obesity prevalence starting with the 2011 data. Because of these changes, estimates of obesity prevalence from 2011 forward cannot be compared to estimates from previous years. Shifts in estimates from previous years may be the results of the new methods, rather than measurable changes in the percentages. The direction and magnitude of changes in each state varies. These variations may depend on the characteristics of the population. State prevalence of obesity remained high across the country in 2011. Obesity prevalence in 2011 varies across states and regions By state, obesity prevalence ranged from 20.7% in Colorado to 34.9% in Mississippi in 2011. No state had a prevalence of obesity less than 20%. 39 states had a prevalence of 25% or more; 12 of these states had a prevalence of 30% or more: Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas, and West Virginia. The South had the highest prevalence of obesity (29.5%), followed by the Midwest (29.0%), the Northeast (25.3%) and the West (24.3%). As you could see obesity is a huge problem not only in our Palm Beach Medical centers, but also across the nation. Do you want stay healthy and stop gaining weight? Then call us now for more information and to request a vip tour of our West Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center. Cagigas Medical Center 1401 South Military Trail West Palm Beach, FL 33415 Office: 561.429.3122 Subscribe to our social media connections: http://www.facebook.com/CagigasMedicalCenter http://www.youtube.com/CagigasMedicalCenter http://www.twitter.com/CagigasMedical
Common's Project Brotherhood  PSA
 
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PB-Common PSA The Project Brotherhood spokesman, Grammy Award Winner Common, speaks about Pro Bro and a short documentary of Project Brotherhood and it's mission with CEO Marcus Murray, Dr. Pete Thomas, Dr. Thomas Mason and more. Common (formerly Common Sense), is an American hip-hop recording artist and actor. Common debuted in 1992 with the album Can I Borrow a Dollar? and maintained a significant underground following into the late 1990s, after which he gained notable mainstream success through his work with the Soulquarians.[1] His first major-label album, Like Water for Chocolate, received widespread critical acclaim and tremendous commercial success.[2] His first Grammy award was in 2003 for Best R&B Song for "Love of My Life (An Ode to Hip-Hop)" with Erykah Badu.[3] Its popularity was matched by May 2005's Be, which was nominated in the 2006 Grammy Awards for Best Rap Album. Common was awarded his second Grammy for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group, for "Southside" (featuring Kanye West), from his July 2007 album Finding Forever. His best-of album, Thisisme Then: The Best of Common, was released on November 27, 2007. Common has also initiated a burgeoning acting career, starring significant roles in such films as Smokin' Aces, Street Kings, American Gangster, Wanted, Terminator Salvation, Date Night, Just Wright, Happy Feet Two, and New Year's Eve. He also narrated the award-winning documentary Bouncing Cats, about one man's efforts to improve the lives of children in Uganda through hip-hop/b-boy culture.[4] He currently stars as Elam Ferguson on the AMC western television series Hell on Wheels. Project Brotherhood (PB) has developed a community based outreach and prevention program for African American men (AAM) residing in the Woodlawn and other surrounding south side communities of Chicago, Illinois. Please Subscribe to Support.... http://www.youtube.com/user/ProjectBrotherhoodTV With this model we have created a "safe" place for Black men to come and seek services. Project Brotherhood goals are to increase the health awareness in black men, with PB's definition of health being: complete physical, mental, social, economic and spiritual well being. Project Brotherhood's mission is to increase the health awareness in Black men by training Black men & providing preventive health messages & literature in a cultural & gender specific way (age specific when necessary). With this new awareness Black men are more likely to go for health screening and testing. This may lead to an early diagnosis and PB knows Black men die from disease due to late or "no" diagnosis at all. Whether it is on the baseball field, basketball court, or just hanging on the corner, Project Brotherhood has become a trusted source of health information and services for men on the south side of Chicago. Project Brotherhood has presented its program and research at a wide variety of professional conferences. We have been honored with the James Wright Award from the National Association of Public Hospitals and have received numerous positive attentions from the press. The Center for Disease Control has recognized Project Brotherhood as an outstanding program that can help reduce health inequities. Project Brotherhood was featured in an installment of CNN's Black in America. http://projectbrotherhood.net/ Homicide is the leading cause of death for African American men between the ages of 18 and 34 HIV/AIDS is the third leading cause of death for Black men aged 25-44 Even though African Americans account for 13% of the US population they account for 49% of HIV/AIDS cases The life expectancy for Black men at birth in Chicago is eight years less than the National averageBlack men have a 20% higher incidence and a 40% higher death rate from all cancer combined than white men Black men have the highest death rate of all racial/ethnic groups, male or female Ten percent of African American Men between the ages of 18 and 34 were in prison in 2005. This is seven times the rate of non-Hispanic White men. Prisoners reentering the community have difficulty obtaining stable employment, adequate housing and health coverage. 5 leading causes of death (In no particular order) HIV Homoicide Cardiovascular diseases Unintentional injuries Cancer
Forum on Opioids: Strategies and Solutions for Minority Communities
 
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Forum discussed partnerships and efforts to combat the opioid epidemic and better address behavioral health in minority populations. The forum was co-hosted by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Office of Minority Health and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration’s Office of Behavioral Health Equity. -- U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) http://www.hhs.gov HHS Privacy Policy http://www.hhs.gov/Privacy.html
OMH National Minority Health Month Observance
 
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Dr. Matthew Lin, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Minority Health and Director, Office of Minority Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) invites you to the HHS National Minority Health Month Observance as we focus attention on partnerships at the federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial levels that help reduce disparities in health and health care. Speakers include leaders from the HHS Office of the Secretary, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Offices of Minority Health, National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) and Indian Health Service. -- U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) http://www.hhs.gov HHS Privacy Policy http://www.hhs.gov/Privacy.html
The Opioid Crisis in America: A Conversation with the U.S. Surgeon General
 
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The 20th Surgeon General of the United States, VADM Jerome M. Adams, and Massachusetts Commissioner of Health Dr. Monica Bharel spoke at a public event titled “The Opioid Crisis in America: A Conversation with the US Surgeon General” at Boston University School of Public Health. During the event, Dr. Adams addressed the US Department of Health and Human Services’ current priorities and what the department and the current administration will be doing to combat the opioid epidemic. Dr. Bharel provided comments on the opioid epidemic in Massachusetts and steps that the state has taken to address the public health issue. Following their remarks, Former Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs Dr. Jonathan Woodson moderated a discussion between the two and took questions from the audience. The event was co-sponsored with Boston University Institute for Health System Innovation and Policy.
Diabetes and Persistent Organic Pollutant Exposure in a the Great Lakes Fish Consumption Study
 
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Presented by Mary Turyk - Associate Professor of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago "Human exposure to persistent organic pollutants, or POPs, is ubiquitous and occurs primarily through consumption of contaminated foods, particularly fish. These toxicants affect many biological systems including hormone regulation, glucose homeostasis, neurologic function and reproduction; some are known carcinogens. The Great Lakes Fish Consumption Study was established in the early 1990's by a consortium of public health departments. This presentation will describe contaminant exposures and fish consumption in this longitudinal cohort. One of the first prospective investigations on the role of POP exposures in the development of diabetes was conducted in this cohort, finding elevated diabetes risk in persons with greater exposure to DDE, a metabolite of DDT. While the biologic pathways by which environmental exposures may increase diabetes risk have not been elucidated, evidence will be presented that suggest POPs may have a stronger impact on blood glucose in persons at higher risk for diabetes."
Participant Engagement and Health Equity Workshop - July 1-2, 2015 - Day 2
 
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On July 1-2, the Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) Working Group of the Advisory Committee to the NIH Director (ACD) held a public workshop on participant engagement and health equity as they relate to the proposed PMI national research cohort. The workshop focused on the design of an inclusive cohort, building and sustaining public trust, direct-from-participant data provision, and effective and active participant engagement characteristics of a national research cohort of one million or more volunteers. The workshop built on the big science questions developed during the April 28–29 workshop at the NIH, digital health data perspectives shared during the May 28-29 workshop, and information on the strategies to address community engagement and health disparities in a large national research cohort gathered from stakeholders through a request for information. The workshop took place on the National Institutes of Health campus in Bethesda, Maryland, and was videocast. A full list of workshops being convened by the ACD PMI Working Group is available on the Events page of the NIH PMI website. Agenda and time codes: Day 2 introduction - Ms. Bray Patrick-Lake - 00:02 White House Vision for the Precision Medicine Initiative - Dr. Francis Collins and Mr. Brian Deese - 11:20 Interagency Proposed Privacy and Trust Framework for a PMI Cohort - Dr. Pearl O'Rourke - 30:10 Keys to Building and Sustaining Participant Engagement in the PMI Cohort - Ms. Bray Patrick-Lake - 1:12:50 Case Study — Given a Set of Assumptions, What Would It Take to Integrate Existing Cohorts into PMI? - Mr. Rob Califf - 2:28:05 Reflection and Next Steps - Ms. Bray Patrick-Lake - 3:50:20
Auburn Coach Wife Kristi Malzahn Agrees with Match & eHarmony: Men are Jerks
 
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My advice is this: Settle! That's right. Don't worry about passion or intense connection. Don't nix a guy based on his annoying habit of yelling "Bravo!" in movie theaters. Overlook his halitosis or abysmal sense of aesthetics. Because if you want to have the infrastructure in place to have a family, settling is the way to go. Based on my observations, in fact, settling will probably make you happier in the long run, since many of those who marry with great expectations become more disillusioned with each passing year. (It's hard to maintain that level of zing when the conversation morphs into discussions about who's changing the diapers or balancing the checkbook.) Obviously, I wasn't always an advocate of settling. In fact, it took not settling to make me realize that settling is the better option, and even though settling is a rampant phenomenon, talking about it in a positive light makes people profoundly uncomfortable. Whenever I make the case for settling, people look at me with creased brows of disapproval or frowns of disappointment, the way a child might look at an older sibling who just informed her that Jerry's Kids aren't going to walk, even if you send them money. It's not only politically incorrect to get behind settling, it's downright un-American. Our culture tells us to keep our eyes on the prize (while our mothers, who know better, tell us not to be so picky), and the theme of holding out for true love (whatever that is—look at the divorce rate) permeates our collective mentality. Even situation comedies, starting in the 1970s with The Mary Tyler Moore Show and going all the way to Friends, feature endearing single women in the dating trenches, and there's supposed to be something romantic and even heroic about their search for true love. Of course, the crucial difference is that, whereas the earlier series begins after Mary has been jilted by her fiancé, the more modern-day Friends opens as Rachel Green leaves her nice-guy orthodontist fiancé at the altar simply because she isn't feeling it. But either way, in episode after episode, as both women continue to be unlucky in love, settling starts to look pretty darn appealing. Mary is supposed to be contentedly independent and fulfilled by her newsroom family, but in fact her life seems lonely. Are we to assume that at the end of the series, Mary, by then in her late 30s, found her soul mate after the lights in the newsroom went out and her work family was disbanded? If her experience was anything like mine or that of my single friends, it's unlikely. And while Rachel and her supposed soul mate, Ross, finally get together (for the umpteenth time) in the finale of Friends, do we feel confident that she'll be happier with Ross than she would have been had she settled down with Barry, the orthodontist, 10 years earlier? She and Ross have passion but have never had long-term stability, and the fireworks she experiences with him but not with Barry might actually turn out to be a liability, given how many times their relationship has already gone up in flames. It's equally questionable whether Sex and the City's Carrie Bradshaw, who cheated on her kindhearted and generous boyfriend, Aidan, only to end up with the more exciting but self-absorbed Mr. Big, will be better off in the framework of marriage and family. (Some time after the breakup, when Carrie ran into Aidan on the street, he was carrying his infant in a Baby Björn. Can anyone imagine Mr. Big walking around with a Björn?)
Views: 157534 Shari Wing