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Genetics and Breast Cancer-Mayo Clinic
 
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While living a healthy lifestyle can play a major role in maintaining good health throughout our lifetime, sometimes things we cannot control.....like our genetics, which can also play a significant role in determining whether or not we are more susceptible to serious diseases such as cancer. Today, the science behind genetics testing, communicated to patients through trained genetics counselors, is helping patients and their extended families understand their risks for getting certain cancers based on their family history. In this two part series, Maegan Roberts, a certified genetic counselor with the Familial Cancer Program at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, shares information about the role genetics can play in determining your risk of cancers with potential hereditary origins.
Views: 1338 Mayo Clinic
Charles Perou - Keynote Breast Cancer Genomics and Genetics
 
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Watch on LabRoots at: http://labroots.com/user/webinars/details/id/88 It is now appreciated that breast cancer is not a single disease, but instead is a spectrum of tumor subtypes with distinct cellular origins, somatic changes and somewhat predictable clinical behaviors. Gene expression data coming from DNA microarrays, and now sequencing-based technologies, has provided additional insights into the biology of breast cancer that has resulted in the development of a number of clinically useful assays. Our work on breast tumors has led to a new molecular taxonomy that identifies at least five subtypes of breast cancers (Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2-enriched, Basal-like and Claudin-low) and a normal breast-like group. Known as the intrinsic subtypes, these groups have revealed critical differences in incidence, survival, metastatic site specificity, and response to treatment. In addition to the intrinsic subtypes, many other important prognostic and predictive gene expression-based profiles have been identified. These tests have lead to the identification of a subset of ER-positive patients that have an extremely good outcome, and thus, for whom adjuvant endocrine therapy alone appears sufficient. Alternatively, the remaining patients/subtypes including Luminal B, HER2-enriched and Basal-like, show significantly worse prognoses, although targeted therapies for HER2plus patients have greatly improved their outcomes. To address the need for the targeting of Luminal B and Basal-like subtypes, genome sequencing approaches are being employed to provide a means of rationally selecting new targeted agents. Other genomics findings with therapeutic potential include the discovery that a subtype of breast cancer (i.e. the Basal-like subtype) shows significant genetic and mRNA expression similarities with Serous Ovarian Cancers; these similarities include TP53 mutation (greater than 85% with almost no other commonly mutated genes), wide spread genomic instability, RB1-deficiency or Cyclin E1 amplification, BRCA1 inactivation, cMYC amplification, and high expression of AKT3. These common genetic/genomic features suggest that drug regimens that are used for Ovarian Cancer (i.e. a taxane and cis/carboplatin regimen) may also be effective on Basal-like breast cancers, which is being tested at a number of sites worldwide. Data from whole exome sequencing of Basal-like cancers will be presented and used as a model of how genome sequencing can contribute to the identification of potentially targetable driver mutations.
Views: 1824 LabRoots
Liberate the Breast Cancer Genes
 
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The lawsuit, Association for Molecular Pathology, et al. v. U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, et al., was filed on behalf of researchers, genetic counselors, women patients, cancer survivors, breast cancer and women's health groups, and scientific associations representing 150,000 geneticists, pathologists, and laboratory professionals. The lawsuit was filed against the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, as well as Myriad Genetics and the University of Utah Research Foundation, which hold the patents on the genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2. The lawsuit charges that patents on human genes violate the First Amendment and patent law because genes are "products of nature" and therefore can't be patented. The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) has granted thousands of patents on human genes -- in fact, about 20 percent of our genes are patented. A gene patent holder has the right to prevent anyone from studying, testing or even looking at a gene. As a result, scientific research and genetic testing has been delayed, limited or even shut down due to concerns about gene patents. On March 29, 2010 a New York federal court ruled that the patents on the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are invalid. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit heard Myriad's appeal of that ruling in April 2011. In July 2011, the appeals court ruled that companies can obtain patents on the genes but cannot patent methods to compare those gene sequences. In March 2012, the U.S. Supreme Court vacated the decision of the appeals court and instructed the court to reconsider the case in light of Mayo v. Prometheus, a Supreme Court decision unanimously invalidating patents on methods for evaluating a patient's response to a drug. For more information go to: http://www.aclu.org/brca
Views: 11689 ACLU
Breast Cancer: Risks and Myths | Paul Sylvester | TEDxULM
 
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We may not know everything about breast cancer, but we have a great amount of research on the risk factors. Dr. Sylvester shares with us how to decrease our chance of developing breast cancer in the hopes that we can reduce the prevalence of the most common cancer in women. Dr. Sylvester received his B.S. degree in Biology from Western Michigan University, in Kalamazoo, MI and his Ph.D. in Physiology from Michigan State University in East Lansing, MI. He completed his postdoctoral training in Experimental Therapeutics at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, NY. Prior to his arrival at the University of Louisiana at Monroe, Dr. Sylvester was a faculty member for 10 years in the College of Pharmacy at Washington State University in Pullman, WA. Dr. Sylvester is an endocrinologist and his research interests have focused on endocrine-dependent diseases, particularly breast cancer. Dr. Sylvester and his collaborators have also been awarded 4 U.S. and international patents and has several additional patents pending review. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 999 TEDx Talks
TAILORx: Phase 3 trial validating a 21-gene expression assay in breast cancer
 
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At the European Cancer Congress (ECC) 2015, Clifford A. Hudis, MD, of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, discusses the low-risk registry results from Trial Assigning IndividuaLized Options for Treatment (TAILORx), which is a prospective phase 3 clinical trial designed to evaluate the role of endocrine therapy and chemoendocrine therapy in patients with oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive, HER2-negative, axillary node-negative breast cancer whose treatment was guided by the 21-gene expression assay results, the Oncotype DX® Breast Cancer Assay Recurrence Score® results.
Views: 40 VJOncology
Dr. Julie Gralow on the Importance of Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer
 
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Julie Gralow, MD, Professor, Medical Oncology Division, University of Washington School of Medicine, talks about the importance of women knowing their history being genetically tested for for breast cancer. For more resources and information regarding anticancer targeted therapies: http://targetedonc.com/
Views: 63 Targeted Oncology
Julie R. Gralow, MD:  New Endocrine Therapy For Metastatic Breast Cancer
 
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Dr. Julie Gralow sits down with Selma Schimmel and The Group Room at the 35th Annual CTRC-AACR San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) for a four-part interview. This is the first in the four-part interview where she discusses new endocrine therapy for metastatic breast cancer patients. Julie Gralow, MD is a medical oncologist who specializes in treating women with breast cancer. She is the Director, Breast Medical Oncology, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance -- Clinical Research Division, Associate Member, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center -- Professor, Medical Oncology Division, University of Washington School of Medicine
How Differences in Genes Can Affect Breast Cancer Development
 
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Kim Hirshfield, M.D., Ph.D.
Views: 168 CancerInstNJ
ER and FGFR1 interaction critical in endocrine resistant breast cancer
 
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Dr Formisano talks to ecancertv at SABCS 2015 about the critical interaction between the estrogen receptor (ER) and amplification of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene in endocrine resistant breast cancer. In the interview, Dr Formisano explains how targeting the FGFR1 gene in combination with anti-estrogen therapy may abrogate resistance and is worthy of further clinical investigation. Specifically he describes the findings of a study in which whole exome sequencing was used to evaluate tumour biopsies taken from 130 women with an operable ER-positive/HER2-negative breast cancer who had received endocrine treatment with an aromatase inhibitor for 10 to 21 days before surgery.
Views: 88 ecancer
Breast Cancer and Genetic Testing with Dr  Paula Rechner
 
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War Memorial Hospital Community Education Series Dr. Paula Rechner Breast Cancer and Genetic Testing October 17, 2013 at Bayliss Public Library, a member of Superior District Library, Sault Sainte Marie, Michigan
Dr. Soliman on Impact of MammaPrint in Patients With Early-Stage Breast Cancer
 
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Hatem Soliman, MD, associate member of The Center for Women’s Oncology at the Moffitt Cancer Center discusses the prospective registry IMPACt study, which measured the impact of the MammaPrint 70-gene Breast Cancer Recurrence Assay in the routine management of women with early-stage breast cancer. The intent of the trial was to gauge how the results given by MammaPrint were changing the treatment recommendation for patients. MammaPrint tests the tissue of patients to determine whether they are high risk or low risk through a high or low score, which is interpreted by physicians in coordination with treatment options. Patients who participated in the study were predominately hormone receptor (HR)-positive, HER2-negative. Those who were eligible and consented to a tissue test would receive a result of either a high Mammaprint score or a low Mammaprint score. Physicians were surveyed prior to the test to see what their recommended treatment option was for their respective patients, as well as their decision-making process on whether or not to administer chemotherapy. After the test was complete, results were given to the physician to discuss with the patients. That discussion and ultimate decision would be recorded to see whether or not there was a change in recommendations of treatment for the patients. There was a significant proportion of patients who were recommended chemotherapy by their physicians prior to the test, but after the MammaPrint results were discussed, those who received a low MammaPrint score were recommended to receive endocrine therapy if they were HR-positive. Conversely, those who were not intially recommended chemotherapy and received a high MammaPrint score were then recommended to have adjuvant chemotherapy. Currently, researchers are looking at MammaPrint in smaller subsets, such as those with patients with small tumors that are triple-negative or HER2-positive, as well.
Views: 244 OncLiveTV
Breast Cancer Index: Mechanism of Action
 
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Extend or End Endocrine Therapy After Year 5 for ER+ Breast Cancer Patients?
Views: 2114 BreastCancerIndex HCP
Genetic Breast Cancer Test Helps Some Patients Avoid Chemo
 
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Imagine being able to skip chemotherapy during a fight against breast cancer. A genetic test is helping doctors to determine which breast cancer patients can do just that. Even after Myra Hartman was diagnosed with breast cancer, her diagnosis did not fully register until she found herself awaiting results from the Oncotype Dx test. The Oncotype Dx test is a genetic test that looks at 21 different genes, and helps doctors figure out who will most likely see a recurrence of cancer, and who will not. Although this test is designed for women with smaller tumors, as opposed to all patients, it enables doctors to determine whether or not a patient can forego chemotherapy. Dr. Tom Sweeney, a medical oncologist at OhioHealth, explains that this test groups patients into one of three categories: high risk, intermediate risk and low risk. Patients categorized in the high risk category are directed toward chemotherapy, while patients who have a low risk are directed toward other forms of treatment. Myra ended up with a score that put her in the low risk group – her test results helped in her decision to skip chemotherapy and instead undergo surgery and radiation therapy. She feels blessed to have been able to skip the side effects of chemo. All women are encouraged to conduct breast self-exams and schedule regular mammograms, to help aid in early detection of breast cancer. For more information about prevention, diagnosis and treatment of this disease, please visit https://www.ohiohealth.com/cancer/cancers-we-treat/breast-cancer/ ?utm_campaign=youtube%20videos?utm_source=youtube?utm_medium=social%20 What do you think about this test? Comment below.
Views: 1129 OhioHealth
Breast cancer researchers look beyond genes to identify more drivers of disease development
 
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Breast cancer researchers have discovered that mutations found outside of genes that accumulate in estrogen receptor-positive breast tumours throughout their development act as dominant culprits driving cancer development.
Views: 285 UHNToronto
Perspectives from ASCO 2018: Advances in early breast cancer - The TAILORx trial
 
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Joseph Sparano reporting from ASCO 2018, explains that the clinical goal in designing the TAILORx trial was to integrate information from the 21-gene assay in the treatment algorithm, and learn if chemotherapy should be given with adjuvant endocrine therapy in women with HR-positive, HER2-negative, node-negative breast cancer with mid-range Recurrence Score (RS). Abstract: Phase III trial of chemoendocrine therapy versus endocrine therapy alone in hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative, node-negative breast cancer and an intermediate prognosis 21-gene recurrence score http://oncologypro.esmo.org/Oncology-News/ESMO-Videos/Perspectives-from-ASCO-2018-Advances-in-early-breast-cancer-The-TAILORx-trial Produced by the European Society for Medical Oncology http://www.esmo.org
Breast Cancer
 
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Breast Cancer is an Animation video by Focus Medica Pvt. Ltd. The complete video can be purchased from Download the App from : Google Play - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.focusmedica.ud_en_breastc Amazon - http://www.amazon.in/Breast-Cancer-Michael-EDT-Dixon/dp/9814206652/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1434435808&sr=8-1&keywords=focus+medica+Breast+cancer For more information please visit www.focusmedica.com.
Views: 15640 Focus Medica
Chief of Breast Surgery Dr. Roshni Rao talks gene test study for breast cancer
 
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Chief of Breast Surgery, Dr. Roshni Rao, explains the study that changes treatment guidelines for women with early-stage breast cancer. Many women with early-stage breast cancer can safely skip chemotherapy and take only a drug that blocks the hormone estrogen or stops the body from making it, called endocrine therapy.
Top 10 Cancer Causing Foods You Should Avoid
 
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Cancer is an abnormal growth of cells. There are more than 100 types of cancer, including breast cancer, skin cancer, lung cancer, colon cancer, prostate cancer, and lymphoma. Possible signs and symptoms include a lump, abnormal bleeding, prolonged cough, unexplained weight loss and a change in bowel movements. Many cancers can be prevented by not smoking, maintaining a healthy weight, not drinking too much alcohol, eating plenty of vegetables, fruits and whole grains, not eating too much processed and red meat, and by avoiding many cancer causing foods that we have listed below. Microwave popcorn bags are lined with perfluorooctanoic acid, a compound that has been linked to various types of cancer, including liver, testicular and pancreatic cancer. Canned foods allow you to enjoy your favorite vegetables throughout the year. However, if you are concerned about your health, avoid canned food, especially canned tomatoes. The cans used to pack tomatoes and other foods are lined with a product called bisphenol A, BPA, an endocrine disruptor that may mimic or disrupt hormones and increase the risks for breast cancer, prostate cancer, early puberty, metabolic disorders, infertility, and several other problems. Farmed salmon is nowhere near as healthy as wild salmon, and eating farmed salmon puts you at a higher risk of developing cancer. Farm-raised fish are fed unnatural diets and contaminated with chemicals, antibiotics, pesticides and other known carcinogens found in materials like asbestos. Hydrogenated oils are vegetable oils, which cannot be naturally extracted like olive oil, soy or canola oil, they are chemically extracted from vegetables and is again chemically treated to change the smell and taste. This process turns unsaturated fat into a stable solid fat, resulting in trans fatty hydrogenated oil which is considered to be the worst type of fat and is known to cause cancer, heart disease, and immune system problems. Potato chips are deep-fried in temperatures above 120 degrees Celsius, which causes them to create a material called acrylamide, a well-known carcinogen found in cigarettes. Genetically modified foods (GMOs) are a rapidly growing industry and have made their way into the majority of our foods like corn, potatoes, grains and soybeans. Such food products are grown using harmful chemicals and, when consumed, can lead to immune system, brain and liver damage. Refined sugar, artificial sweeteners and fructose-rich sweeteners like high-fructose corn syrup are not good for your health. These products tend to rapidly spike insulin levels and feed the growth of cancer cells. Refined White flour contains excess carbohydrates that are not good for your health and even increase the risk of cancer. During the milling process, white flour is bleached with chlorine gas, which is highly toxic for the body. Processed meats such as ham, sausage and bacon have chemicals and preservatives like sodium nitrates, which make them bad for your health. In addition, processed meat contains excessive salt, which is also not good for you. Pickled and smoked foods are delicious but, at the same time, very harmful to the body. In fact, smoked meats that pick up tar from the smoking process cause extreme harm to your body. Plus, most pickled foods contain nitrates that turn into N-nitroso, which increases your risk of cancer.
Views: 1905105 Gnxtgroup
Men and Breast Cancer
 
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Did you know that men can get breast cancer just like women? Dr. Mark Kelley, division chief of surgical oncology and endocrine surgery at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, explains the genetic and age factors that put men more at risk for developing breast cancer. He also describes the various treatments available for men as well as if there is a difference in survival rates between men and women.
Views: 1920 Vanderbilt Health
Early Warning Signs of Breast Cancer No One Talks About
 
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Early Warning Signs of Breast Cancer No One Talks About (It's not just about bumps). Bosom malignancy mindfulness month has quite recently gotten in progress, which implies the Great Pink Push is being released. The disease business will move into overdrive, encouraging ladies wherever to get their mammogram screenings as they ask for money gifts for bosom tumor investigate. At the same time giving little in the method for reasonable safeguard tips and apparatuses that ladies can use to maintain a strategic distance from this basic type of disease. As an educated, wellbeing shrewd individual, you most likely need to recognize what you have to look forright now with a specific end goal to stop bosom malignancy from developing in any way. Rather than attempting to manage it after you've just been analyzed – which ideally will never happen! We've arranged a rundown of five early cautioning bosom growth signs, a large portion of which are once in a while discussed in the media, that you can use in your precaution munititions stockpile to remain on the ball. Don't Just Look for Lumps:. The most well-known way that traditional specialists search for bosom tumor in ladies is to distinguish bumps in the bosom. They regularly do this with mammogram x-beams. This offer doctors a fundamental guide for exploring the landscape of bosom tissue, enabling them to pinpoint any knots, masses, or other faulty variations from the norm that may point to a threat. Be that as it may, mammograms can be a potential reason for growth because of the ionizing radiation they send into bosom tissue. They likewise aren't precise 100 percent of the time, regardless of what you may have been told. Protuberances and masses in bosom tissue can be either kindhearted (innocuous) or dangerous (destructive), and mammograms don't separate between the two. This frequently prompts false analyses and pointless medicines with chemotherapy and radiation. A superior alternative, in the event that you experience routine malignancy screenings, is thermography. This interesting screening technique enables specialists to search for unordinary protuberances or developments, as well as distinguish regardless of whether angiogenesis is occurring inside the bosom tissue. This is a considerably more grounded and more exact pointer that bosom malignancy might be available. Angiogenesis is a favor method for saying fresh recruits vessel development, which may demonstrate that a lady's body is attempting to fabricate another supply framework for blood to be conveyed to creating bosom tumors. Specialists who work in inspecting thermography pictures will have the capacity to recognize regardless of whether angiogenesis is occurring, and propose a legitimate strategy. Hormones and Cellular Health:. A ton of wellbeing specialists jump at the chance to discuss bosom malignancy as something that outcomes from "awful hereditary qualities," being passed down from moms to their little girls. This suggests bosom malignancy can't be maintained a strategic distance from and happens as a sad "result of pure chance" sort situation. What's more, contingent upon the kind of bosom malignancy they're discussing, there might be some legitimacy to this prevalent hypothesis. However, most kinds of bosom malignancy are a consequence of condition, eating routine, and way of life, all of which manage how a lady's endocrine framework delivers and equalizations hormones. At the end of the day, hormone awkwardness assumes a significantly more prominent part in deciding bosom tumor chance than many individuals might suspect. Thermography can enable qualified doctors to decide if a lady has a raised bosom growth hazard because of this regularly ignored early pointer. Take in Your Body's Natural Rhythms:. Each lady's body has a novel back and forth movement, and getting tuned in to your very own mood is precious to stay sound. Giving careful consideration to any bizarre changes that may happen, particularly inside bosom tissue, is basic to stay away from bosom disease. On the off chance that you feel any strange hurts or agonies in your bosom, including intermittent throbbing, torment, or notwithstanding fluctuating inconvenience, converse with your specialist. Numerous ladies expect that exclusive a disengaged knot with confined torment recommends the nearness of bosom disease. In all actuality bosom malignancy can show as "scattered, All Photos Licensed Under CC Source : www.pexels.com www.pixabay.com www.commons.wikimedia.org
Views: 1348 Happy Life Tips
The Great Invasion - Documentary on endocrine disruptors
 
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A documentary by Stéphane Horel on endocrine disrupting chemicals (2010). Our ordinary everyday lives are steeped in chemical products. Invisible, they are encrusted in plastic, in detergents and toasters, concealed in our food, in toys, in shampoo. They have invaded everything, including our bodies. Thanks to the consumer society, petrochemicals, with their magicical powers and unfamiliar barbaric names are happily strolling around our little insides. These phthalates, brominated flame retardants, parabens, bisphenol-a, all have the regrettable habit of invading our hormonal intimacy. They are endocrine disruptors. The pioneer scientists taking part in this documentary say that from breast cancer to obesity, this chemical invasion is closely tied up with the diseases of modern society. These findings are more than dramatic, but the film takes a step back from the straight facts, alternating wry humour and poetry. The paper cut-out animation shows parallel sketches of the destinies of human beings and laboratory animals. 1950-60s TV commercials show radiant couples dancing between two-door fridges: a love story between modern man and the marvels of plastic and the profusion of electric appliances, pure allegories of the frenzy of progress. With Linda Birnbaum, Philippe Grandjean, Jerrold Heindel, Andreas Kortenkamp, Niels Skakkebaek, Ana Soto, Shanna Swan.
Views: 33588 Georgette Stigler
Endocrine Therapy in Breast Cancer
 
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Endocrine Therapy in Breast Cancer
Views: 122 Douglas Huff
Communicating Breast Cancer Genetic Testing Results to Patients
 
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Harold J. Burstein, MD, PhD, and Adam M. Brufsky, MD, PhD, highlight how to communicate results to patients, including informed consent, incidental findings, and additional screenings.
Views: 77 OncLiveTV
Reprogramming Breast Cancer Risk in Utero via Endocrine Disruptor and Dietary Fat Interaction
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) Shuk-mei Ho, Director of the Center for Environmental Genetics at the University of Cincinnati, is internationally recognized for her expertise in the role of hormones and endocrine disruptors on disease development. She explores breast cancer risk in utero. She explores studies that suggest prenatal exposure to BPA and the HFB displayed complex interaction to affect mammary gland development, DMBA-susceptible window, tumor incidence and tumor growth in a complex, non-monotonic manner. Series: "Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 25018]
Dr. Ellis Describes Breast Cancer Heterogeneity
 
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Matthew J. Ellis, MD, PhD, professor of medicine, director, Breast Cancer Program, Siteman Cancer Center, describes how cryptic mutations, previously undetected base changes in genetics, contribute to tumor heterogeneity in women with breast cancer. Ellis explains that a whole genome sequence in hormone receptor (HR)-positive patients that are undergoing endocrine therapy, before treatment and 4-5 months into treatment, provides an accurate picture of how the tumor changes. At 4-5 months immunohistochemistry will still show that the patient is still HR-positive but a closer look at the cryptic mutations will reveal multiple changes. Rare mutations in the pretreatment phase can become more common while the prevalent mutations drop out. This type of heterogeneity reveals the hidden complexity of breast cancer. In order to find the best treatment for patients, researchers and physicians need to fully embrace heterogeneity. The concept of a constantly adjusting and changing tumor alters treatments.
Views: 218 OncLiveTV
Thyroid Disease & Breast Cancer
 
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Breastlink surgeon Dr. Nimmi Kapoor talks about her medical background and how she became interested in thyroid disease and breast cancer. Dr. Kapoor’s interest in thyroid disease began before her interest in breast cancer. In college, she studied endocrine diseases. She worked in a lab examining sexual differentiation in zebra finches. It introduced her to hormonal pathways, which she found fascinating because by studying them, you can learn how to monitor and control the body’s operation based on the endocrine system. The breast is an endocrine organ and is sensitive to the hormones in our body. Breast changes are often the result of hormonal changes. During her two years of basic science research in the lab, she realized many of the genetic changes in thyroid cancer overlap with many of the changes seen in breast cancer. The methods used to differentiate between benign and malignant cancers in thyroid nodules are the same ones used in breast cancer treatment, because breast cancer has a genetic pathway. There is actually a connection between the risk of thyroid cancer and breast cancer. Many women diagnosed with breast cancer are often diagnosed with thyroid cancer later on. Doctors still don’t understand the link between them, but Dr. Kapoor thinks it may be genetic. Women with the PTEN mutation often develop both breast and thyroid cancer, which is the reason why Dr. Kapoor always performs a thyroid exam when she performs a breast exam. To learn more about Dr. Kapoor, Breastlink, and breast cancer, visit our website: www.breastlink.com
Views: 633 Breastlink Orange
MammaPrint genetic testing reduces chemotherapy overtreatment in breast cancer patients
 
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Martine Piccart, MD, PhD & Head of the Medicine Department at the Jules Bordet Institute and Co-Founder of the Breast International Group (BIG) discusses primary analysis of the EORTC 10041/BIG 3-04 MINDACT study: A prospective, randomized study evaluating the clinical utility of the 70-gene signature (MammaPrint) combined with common clinical-pathological criteria for selection of patients for adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer with 0 to 3 positive nodes at the American Association of Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016 (AACR16). MDLinx Conference Coverage - American Association of Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016: http://www.mdlinx.com/oncology/conference-interview/american-association-of-cancer-research-annual-meeting-2016/231097 MDLinx: http://www.mdlinx.com/ Smartest Doc & Board Exam Prep: http://www.thesmartestdoc.com/ M3 USA: http://usa.m3.com/ Follow MDLinx: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/MDLinx Twitter - https://twitter.com/MDLinx Google+ - https://plus.google.com/+Mdlinx/
Views: 1807 MDLinx
Adjuvant Therapy in Early-Stage ER-Positive, HER2-Negative Invasive Breast Cancer
 
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Dr. Hope Rugo shares her experience on the recommended treatment approach for ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer patients. She comments on what is the expected benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy and endocrine therapy in luminal breast cancers and mentions that one of the greatest challenges is to understand the heterogeneity of the tumor. She also provides interesting comments on the use of criteria like tumor grade and size to select the patients for adjuvant chemotherapy as well as the usage of IHC markers such hormone receptors ER-positive, PR and Growth Factor Receptor HER2 to identify patients for chemotherapy. Finally, she speaks about tools such Adjuvant! Online and Predict and debates if these tools could be used to select luminal breast cancer patients confidently for adjuvant chemotherapy. _______________________________________________________ Hope Rugo, MD, is the Clinical Professor, Department of Medicine (Hematology/Oncology); and Director, Breast Oncology and Clinical Trials Education at the University of California San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center.
Views: 7743 Genomic Health, Inc.
Understanding Pathology for Breast Cancer
 
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Dr. Sean Thornton, a pathologist with Cellnetix Laboratories and Pathology, talks about the pathology and biology of breast cancer and the role a pathologist plays in your care. To learn more about Cellnetix, please visit http://www.cellnetix.com
Views: 32220 swedishseattle
Cost Considerations in Breast Cancer Genetic Testing
 
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Adam M. Brufsky, MD, PhD; Harold J. Burstein, MD, PhD; and Claudine Isaacs, MD, provide insight on the cost considerations in breast cancer genetic testing, including reimbursement, out-of-pocket costs, and finding the appropriate cost-effective option.
Views: 65 OncLiveTV
Breast Cancer and Genetic Testing Part 2 - Positive BRCA test....What's next?
 
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New development in Angelina Jolie's decision to have a double mastectomy -- she has now opted to have her ovaries removed. Dr. James Stewart, Chief of Hematology/Oncology at Baystate Medical Center, shares his insight into the role genetics plays in breast cancer risk and what you should do if your test is positive.
Views: 152 BAYSTATEHEALTH
Tamoxifen does not prevent Breast Cancer
 
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Tamoxifen does not prevent Breast Cancer Tamoxifen is an antagonist of the estrogen receptor in breast tissue. Some breast cancer cells require estrogen to grow. Estrogen binds to and activates the estrogen receptor in these cells. Tamoxifen is metabolized into compounds that bind to the estrogen receptor but do not activate it. They only prevent estrogen from binding to its receptor Tumor evolves along the following stages: Stem cell transformation Estrogen dependence - Dysplasia - Carcinoma in situ - Carcinoma with receptors Estrogen independence - Carcinoma without receptors - Anaplastic carcinoma Estrogen is not a carcinogen. It does not transform a normal stem cell into a malignant. Estrogen promotes growth only of cells with estrogen receptors. Tamoxifen is metabolized into compounds that bind to the estrogen receptor but do not activate it. They only prevent estrogen from binding to its receptor. Tamoxifen is an anti-promoter, and not an anti-carcinogen! When they say "Prevention of Breast Cancer" they actually observe the slowing down of tumor growth. Tamoxifen does not prevent, it only slows down Medicine wake up! Stop these prevention trials and let these healthy women enjoy life without tamoxifen.
Views: 8683 Gershom Zajicek M.D,
07 - Treatments of Breast Cancer - Interview with Dr. David Flockhart
 
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For additional information visit http://www.cancerquest.org/david-flockhart-interview. Dr. David Flockhart, Harry and Edith Gladstein Chair in Cancer Genomics and Professor of Medicine in Medical Genetics and Pharmacology at Indiana University School of Medicine. Dr. Flockhart's research focuses on the individual ways that different people respond to cancer treatments.  The differences are important in predicting the outcome of the treatment and is based, in part, on their genetic make-up.  Pharmacogenomics is a field that studies this relationship and Dr. Flockhart is developing new tools to study this interaction.  Ultimately his work could yield new treatments or better ways to use existing treatments.  In the interview he discusses the evolution of treatment in breast cancer. To learn more about cancer and watch additional interviews, please visit the CancerQuest website at http://www.cancerquest.org.
Views: 107 CancerQuest
New approaches for treatment of therapy resistance in breast cancer
 
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Professor Charles Coombes, Imperial Lead for the Cancer Research Centre of Excellence at Imperial College London and Consultant Medical Oncologist at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, outlines his work to develop a new test and drugs to help patients whose breast cancer has become resistant to traditional hormone therapies. Professor Coombes presented his findings at the recent Imperial College Academic Health Science Centre (AHSC) seminar series event, which took place at Charing Cross Hospital.
Obesity and endocrine therapy in breast cancer: Pamela Goodwin, Canada)
 
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BCC 2013 St. Gallen / Webcasts / Thursday 14 March 2013 / Session 3: Biology of breast cancer II: Genetics prevention and metabolism: Obesity and endocrine therapy: Host factors and breast cancer outcome (Pamela Goodwin, Canada)
Views: 61 oncoletter
Targeted sequencing in endocrine refractory breast cancer
 
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Dr Bartlett speaks with ecancer at ASCO 2017 about targeted sequencing in endocrine refractory breast cancer using specimens from a clinical trial of around 4,500 cases. He mentions the ability to integrate both point mutation data, gene expression and copy number variation, where it is possible to identify pathways which are associated with hormone refractory cancers. This may give the capability to stratify patients by these pathways for future therapeutic development.
Views: 3 ecancer
Diabetes, obesity, cancer linked to common chemicals – health group
 
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The Endocrine Society has released a statement linking endocrine-disrupting chemicals(EDCs) to obesity, infertility and breast cancer. However, EDCs are found in countless food and household products. RT’s Manuel Rapalo reports. Find RT America in your area: http://rt.com/where-to-watch/ Or watch us online: http://rt.com/on-air/rt-america-air/ Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTAmerica Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_America
Views: 3003 RT America
Top 10 Cancer Causing Foods You Probably Eat Every Day
 
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Cancer is an abnormal growth of cells with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body. There are more than 100 types of cancer, including breast cancer, skin cancer, lung cancer, colon cancer, prostate cancer, and lymphoma. Possible signs and symptoms include a lump, abnormal bleeding, prolonged cough, unexplained weight loss and a change in bowel movements. Many cancers can be prevented by not smoking, maintaining a healthy weight, not drinking too much alcohol, eating plenty of vegetables, fruits and whole grains and by avoiding many cancer causing foods you probably eat every day. Canned Tomatoes - Canned Tomatoes are not good for your health because the cans which is used to pack tomatoes are lined with a product called bisphenol A, BPA, an endocrine disruptor that may mimic or disrupt hormones and increase the risks for breast cancer, prostate cancer, early puberty, metabolic disorders, infertility, and several other problems. Microwave popcorn - Microwave popcorn is one of the most popular snacks in many parts of the world. But there are two safety issues involving the chemicals added into many brands of microwave popcorn. The first stems from the use of diacetyl in artificial butter flavor. Diacetyl appears to damage lungs when it is repeatedly inhaled in vaporized form. The other issue is with the lining of popcorn bags. Genetically modified foods- GMOs are grown using harmful chemicals and, when consumed, can lead to immune system, brain and liver damage. After GMO’s were introduced in 1996, GM vegetables fed to rats caused development of horrifying tumors. Soda Pop - Sodas are loaded with sugar and an empty source of calories that cause weight gain and contribute to the nationwide epidemic of obesity. Drinking large amounts of this rapidly digested sugar causes your blood sugar to spike which can lead to both inflammation and insulin resistance. Hydrogenated oils - Hydrogenated oils are vegetable oils, which cannot be naturally extracted like olive oil, soy or canola oil, they are chemically extracted from vegetables and is again chemically treated to change the smell and taste. This process turns unsaturated fat into a stable solid fat, resulting in trans fatty hydrogenated oil which is considered to be the worst type of fat and is known to cause cancer, heart disease, and immune system problems. Refined sugar and artificial sweeteners - Refined sugar, artificial sweeteners and fructose-rich sweeteners like high-fructose corn syrup are detrimental for your health. These products tend to rapidly spike insulin levels and feed the growth of cancer cells. Farmed salmon - Farmed salmon is nowhere near as healthy as wild salmon, and eating farmed salmon puts you at a higher risk of developing cancer. Farm-raised fish are fed unnatural diets and contaminated with chemicals, antibiotics, pesticides and other known carcinogens found in materials like asbestos. Processed meats or red meat - Processed meats such as ham, sausage and bacon have chemicals and preservatives like sodium nitrates, which make them bad for your health. In addition, processed meat contains excessive salt, which is also not good for you. In a 2008 study published in the Nutrition and Cancer journal, researchers found that processed meat intake might be involved in the etiology of colorectal cancer. Pickled and smoked foods - Pickled and smoked foods are delicious but, at the same time, very harmful to the body. In fact, smoked meats that pick up tar from the smoking process cause extreme harm to your body. Plus, most pickled foods contain nitrates that turn into N-nitroso, which increases your risk of cancer. Alcohol - Drinking too much alcohol is not good for your health and can put you at certain types of developing cancer risks. Regularly drinking a large glass of wine a day can increase the risk of mouth, upper throat, oesophageal also known as food pipe, breast and bowel cancers. When you drink alcohol, it is converted into a toxic chemical called acetaldehyde in your body. This can damage your DNA and stop your cells from repairing that damage, which can lead to various types of cancer.
Views: 13021 Gnxtgroup
Breast cancer biomarkers: From serendipity to rational discovery
 
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Breast cancer biomarkers: From serendipity to rational discovery Dr. Partha Ray, Carle Clinic Powerpoint: http://light.ece.illinois.edu/bss12/Ray_2012%20Beckman%20Biophotonics%20School%20RAY.pdf
Views: 1288 NanoBio Node
Dr. Pusztai on Evolution of Treatment for HER2+ Breast Cancer
 
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Lajos Pustzai, MD, DPhil, professor of Medicine (Medical Oncology), chief of Breast Medical Oncology, co-director, Yale Cancer Center Genetics, Genomics and Epigenetics Program, Yale Cancer Center, discusses how treatment for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer has evolved.
Views: 93 OncLiveTV
Exposure: Environmental Links to Breast Cancer
 
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An excerpt from the award-winning documentary, Exposure: Environmental Links to Breast Cancer. Featuring Olivia Newton-John, Dr. Devra Lee Davis, Bella Abzug, Dr. Rosalie Bertell, Matushka, Dr. Susan Love and Eva Johnson. For more information, visit www.whenvironments.ca.
Views: 5156 whenvironments
Systemic thinking about cancer | Miscellaneous | Heatlh & Medicine | Khan Academy
 
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Dr. David Agus discusses thinking systemically about cancer and other things. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/health-and-medicine/healthcare-misc/v/inflammation?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=healthandmedicine Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/health-and-medicine/healthcare-misc/v/ritual-of-the-bedside-exam?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=healthandmedicine Health & Medicine on Khan Academy: No organ quite symbolizes love like the heart. One reason may be that your heart helps you live, by moving ~5 liters (1.3 gallons) of blood through almost 100,000 kilometers (62,000 miles) of blood vessels every single minute! It has to do this all day, everyday, without ever taking a vacation! Now that is true love. Learn about how the heart works, how blood flows through the heart, where the blood goes after it leaves the heart, and what your heart is doing when it makes the sound “Lub Dub.” About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Health & Medicine channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1RAowgA3q8Gl7exSWJuDEw?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 122617 Khan Academy
Dr. Tara Sanft talks about a genetic test that will help women with breast cancer know whether they
 
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Dr. Tara Sanft talks about a genetic test that will help women with breast cancer know whether they should undergo endocrine therapy past five years. UID: zq048r Created At: 2016-12-23T20:50:42Z
Good News for Women With Breast: Many Don’t Need Chemo
 
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Subscribe to Good Life : https://goo.gl/ArFnf1 Good News for Women With Breast Cancer: Many Don’t Need Chemo Many women with early-stage forms of the disease can forego chemo, based on a test that measures the activity of genes involved in breast cancer recurrence. Many women with early-stage breast cancer who would receive chemotherapy under current standards do not actually need it, according to a major international study that is expected to quickly change medical treatment. “We can spare thousands and thousands of women from getting toxic treatment that really wouldn’t benefit them,” said Dr. Ingrid A. Mayer, from Vanderbilt University Medical Center, an author of the study. “This is very powerful. It really changes the standard of care.” The study found that gene tests on tumor samples were able to identify women who could safely skip chemotherapy and take only a drug that blocks the hormone estrogen or stops the body from making it. The hormone-blocking drug tamoxifen and related medicines, called endocrine therapy, have become an essential part of treatment for most women because they lower the risks of recurrence, new breast tumors and death from the disease...
Views: 45 Good Life
Breast Cancer Q&A -- Sloan-Kettering
 
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During a conversation with audience members, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's Clifford Hudis, MD, covers a range of issues including therapy for both in situ and invasive lobular carcinoma, the role of diet and nutrition in breast cancer, optimal use of aromatase inhibitor therapy, and emerging treatments for HER2-positive breast cancers. For more information, please visit http://www.mskcc.org/breastcancer
Expert Perspectives: Rationale for CDK 4/6 Inhibition in Breast Cancer
 
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The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) pathway is critical to cell cycle entry. In many tumor types, including breast cancer, there is dysregulation of this pathway. This activity describes the rationale and mechanism for inhibiting this dysregulated pathway in estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) metastatic breast cancer using selective CDK 4/6 inhibitors. Earn accreditation for this activity at the following location: http://elc.imedex.com/ELC/Activity-Search.aspx?search=7169 © 2016 Imedex, LLC.
Views: 2186 ImedexCME
Patient Selection for Eribulin in Breast Cancer
 
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Joyce O’Shaughnessy, MD, and Mark Pegram, MD, discuss the use of eribulin in clinical practice, which is particularly effective for triple-negative breast cancer.
Views: 443 OncLiveTV
Dr. Pusztai Discusses BCI in Patients With ER-Positive/HR-Positive Breast Cancer
 
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Lajos Pusztai, MD, DPhil, professor of Medicine (Medical Oncology), chief, Breast Medical Oncology, co-director, Cancer Genetics Research Program, Yale Cancer Center, discusses the Breast Cancer Index in patients with ER-positive/HR-positive breast cancer.
Views: 219 OncLiveTV
Live Webchat: Choosing a Clinical Trial for Metastatic Breast Cancer
 
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If you’re living with metastatic breast cancer, tune in Friday, May 20, noon-1 p.m., for a live video webchat with experts Eric Winer, MD, and Nancy Lin, MD on choosing clinical trials. These research studies, which test new drugs in patients, can offer you advanced care and make new treatments possible in the future. Dr. Winer is director of Breast Oncology for the Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Dr. Lin is clinical director. Submit your questions for Dr. Winer or Dr. Lin by emailing webchats@dfci.harvard.edu or tweeting them to @DanaFarber using the hashtag #DFCIwebchat. For more information on metastatic breast cancer, visit http://www.susanfsmith.org.