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Rheumatoid Arthritis Symptoms, Signs & Diagnosis | StreamingWell.com
 
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Recognising and diagnosing the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis as early as possible makes a real difference to the quality of life of patients. In this video Jean's story is highlighted. Jean lived with the symptoms of arthritis for many years before her condition was properly diagnosed although she is now receiving effective treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Also in this video the signs, symptoms and causes of rheumatoid arthritis are highlighted by Dr. Graham Davenport, who goes on to emphasise the importance of early diagnosis and advises what symptoms to look out for in your everyday life. Streaming Well is a healthcare focused, award-winning video production company which operates in the US and Europe. Find us at: http://www.streamingwell.com Subscribe to Streaming Well: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=StreamingWell Like us on: http://www.facebook.com/StreamingWell Follow us on: http://www.twitter.com/StreamingWell Follow us on: http://www.instagram.com/streamingwell Follow us on: http://pinterest.com/StreamingWell/
Views: 38851 streamingwell
Rheumatoid Arthritis: What Are the Early Symptoms?
 
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Hey, Everyone! It’s Dr. Ashley Biscoe here with a short video for you today I want to talk to you guys about rheumatoid arthritis. It’s such a common condition, and I know that a lot of people out there have questions about what some of the earliest signs and symptoms are of rheumatoid arthritis. And so that ’s what we’ll talk about today. Download our FREE Quickstart Guide to a Healthy Gut: http://attunequickstartguide.getresponsepages.com/ Book a FREE 10-minute consultation with one of our doctors: http://www.attunemed.com/prospective_patients.html
MY STORY: How I Was Diagnosed With RA (Rheumatoid Arthritis) At 18
 
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I want to share my story mainly just to let others know where I'm coming from. Thanks for watching! Please give a like & subscribe for more! Follow my Instagram: itsmegzz_fitness Email: megzz.fitness@gmail.com
Views: 7322 Megan Tovar
Early Rheumatoid Arthritis: Clinical Guideline for Diagnosis and Management
 
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Rheumatoid arthritis affects 1 in 100 Australians. It is a major cause of disability and psychological distress due to its chronic, painful and disabling character. Rheumatoid arthritis, an inflammatory autoimmune disease, is the second most common type of arthritis after osteoarthritis. The disease is more common amongst women and in the older age groups. Untreated rheumatoid arthritis can result in joint damage and deformities. The disease impacts on activities of daily living, capacity to work, and family life. Early diagnosis and medical intervention are critical to limiting structural damage and improving health outcomes. The Clinical Guideline for Diagnosis and Management of Early Rheumatoid Arthritis presents recommendations to assist and support clinical judgement of GPs in managing patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This program, in line with the Guideline, focuses on diagnosis, early management, and coordination of multidisciplinary care needs for people with rheumatoid arthritis. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions are reviewed. The Clinical Guideline recognises the need for every patient with rheumatoid arthritis to have a thorough assessment of their individual needs; access to a range of health professionals; and a comprehensive care plan. This program is one of four in the Musculoskeletal Guideline Series. The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) has developed national musculoskeletal clinical guidelines for general practitioners and other primary care health professionals for osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and osteoporosis. Produced by the Rural Health Education Foundation http://www.rhef.com.au/
Views: 8774 Rural Health Channel
5 Warning Signs of Rheumatoid Arthritis
 
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Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects 1.3 million Americans, and it's three times more common in women. While RA shares symptoms with other conditions, if you're experiencing any of these warning signs, speak to your doctor. Everyday Health is your No. 1 resource for health and wellness advice. We make it fun and easy to live a healthier, happier lifestyle. Subscribe now and start feeling better — every day. Like Everyday Health: http://on.fb.me/TcD67y Follow Everday Health: http://bit.ly/TuY0cw Pin Everyday Health: http://bit.ly/Tv4OXu Everyday Health Tumblr: http://bit.ly/OIIjlc 5 Warning Signs of Rheumatoid Arthritis I Everyday Health
Views: 144127 Everyday Health
With A Wish - A Short Movie for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients (Chugai Pharmaceutical)
 
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The pain of rheumatoid arthritis is difficult to be understood by others. Consulting the specialist and beginning the treatment early may give patients hope. Through this short movie, “With A Wish,” Chugai aims to increase disease awareness and support patients and their families smile again. Chugai Pharmaceutical http://www.chugai-pharm.co.jp/english/
Rheumatoid arthritis | early xray changes ra
 
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http://www.arthritistreatmentcenter.com What does this x-ray say about the need for surgery… the answer could be very important to you Early X-Ray Changes Signal Later Joint Surgery Nancy Walsh writing for Medpage Today reported on a study which showed that rapid x-ray progression during the first year of rheumatoid arthritis strongly predicts the need for orthopedic surgery later in the course of disease, a researcher said here. A clinically significant change in Larsen radiographic score of 4 units during the first 12 months of disease was associated with an 80% increased risk of subsequently having surgery on the small joints of the hands and feet and a 50% greater chance of needing major surgery on the knee or hip, reported Lewis Carpenter BsC of the University of Hertfordshire in Hatfield. "This helps build the case for early treatment in rheumatoid arthritis and adds to the argument for a therapeutic window of opportunity," he said at the annual meeting of the British Society for Rheumatology. Comment: Sobering news and a clarion call for aggressive management. http://youtu.be/SMr4FREsDRI
Views: 760 Nathan Wei
Symptoms and Treatment for Rheumatoid Arthritis patients.
 
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Jim Morelli reports on Rheumatoid Arthritis and how to treat it.
Views: 104585 CNN
Rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis
 
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This global health concern lecture explains rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis with MRI, X ray, CAT scan. For more information, log on to- http://www.shomusbiology.com/ Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here- http://www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html Remember Shomu’s Biology is created to spread the knowledge of life science and biology by sharing all this free biology lectures video and animation presented by Suman Bhattacharjee in YouTube. All these tutorials are brought to you for free. Please subscribe to our channel so that we can grow together. You can check for any of the following services from Shomu’s Biology- Buy Shomu’s Biology lecture DVD set- www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store Shomu’s Biology assignment services – www.shomusbiology.com/assignment -help Join Online coaching for CSIR NET exam – www.shomusbiology.com/net-coaching We are social. Find us on different sites here- Our Website – www.shomusbiology.com Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/ShomusBiology/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/shomusbiology SlideShare- www.slideshare.net/shomusbiology Google plus- https://plus.google.com/113648584982732129198 LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/suman-bhattacharjee-2a051661 Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheFunsuman Thank you for watching
Views: 8627 Shomu's Biology
Osteoarthritis vs rheumatoid arthritis symptoms | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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Visit us (http://www.khanacademy.org/science/healthcare-and-medicine) for health and medicine content or (http://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat) for MCAT related content. These videos do not provide medical advice and are for informational purposes only. The videos are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read or seen in any Khan Academy video. Created by Amy Fan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-muscular-skeletal-diseases/rn-arthritis/v/osteoarthritis-vs-rheumatoid-arthritis-pathophysiology?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-muscular-skeletal-diseases/rn-arthritis/v/what-is-arthritis?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 150782 khanacademymedicine
Rheumatoid Arthritis of the hand - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes the condition of rheumatoid arthritis, the etiology, signs and symptoms, the diagnostic tests and indications, and the treatment options and prognosis. Rheumatoid Arthritis involves the synovium of the joints. The condition of rheumatoid arthritis will result in deformities. Rheumatoid Arthritis occurs in females more than males. There may be a hereditary component with Rheumatoid Arthritis. Rheumatoid Arthritis has spontaneous remissions and exacerbations. The disease can have a systemic nature. Pain and stiffness of joints especially in the morning (morning stiffness). Rheumatoid Arthritis is typically polyarticular, bilateral and symmetrical and most commonly affects the hands and feet. x-rays show periarticular erosions at the time of diagnosis. Osteopenia and minimal osteophyte formation favor the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Pathogenesis Rheumatoid Arthritis is an autoimmune disease. The disease has two components: immunological reaction. Increased degradative enzymes. The IgM (Rheumatoid factor) is produced by the plasma cell as ana antibody to the native IgG, which is altered in RA. 70% of patient with RA have rheumatoid factor positive. Leucocytes are attracted to the immune complex forming deposits over the inflammatory surface of the synovium. These leucocytes ingest fibrin and immune complex and is called the Rheumatoid cells. The leucocytes release lysosomal enzymes that cause acute inflammatory response and tissue necrosis as well as inflammatory mediators ( IL-1, IL-6, TNF alpha). The chondrocytes respond to stimulation by TNF- alpha, IL-1 and other inflammatory mediators causing cells to become activated and secrete more metalloproteinases which lead to cartilage damage. The synovium becomes hypertrophied (pannus), showing intimal hyperplasia and infiltration by plasma cells and lymphocytes. Stages of Rheumatoid Arthritis Early: acute: hot swollen tender joints (synovitis) •MCP swelling •Wrist swelling •Flexor sheath synovitis Complicated: digital vasculitis, ecchymosis, skin atrophy, nodules. Advanced •Swelling of MCP joints •Lateral slippage of extensor tendon ruptures •Ulnar deviation of fingers •Xrays show destruction of MCP with subluxation, ulnar deviation and wrist destruction. •Finger deformities: Mallet, boutonniere, Swan neck The thumb is also involved. These changes occur due to proliferation, inflammation and hypertrophy of the synovium. Involvement of the distal radioulnar joint is usually associated with rupture of the extensor digiti minimi. Rheumatoid nodules 25% of patients with RA will have subcutaneous nodules on extensor surfaces of elbow and forearm. Nodules are often multiple and seen along the ulnar margin of the forearm or pulp of the digits. Vasculitis is more common in patients with SC nodules, it is strongly seropositive disease (aggressive) with less favorable prognosis. Treatment •Synovitis: splint and medical treatment •Joint space narrowing, bone erosions and osteopenia: synovectomy. •Joint destruction/fixed deformity/ loss of hand function: surgery based on condition Before operating on RA patients, x-ray of the cervical spine is needed because the patient may have subluxation of C1-C2. Metacarpophalangeal joint arthroplasty of the fingers usually results in decreased extensor lag and improvement of the ulnar drift. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC
Views: 93676 nabil ebraheim
Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Symptoms
 
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Sharing the symptoms that I had many years ago that led me to my Rheumatoid Arthritis diagnosis.
Views: 6075 Carmen C
5 WARNING SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS
 
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5 WARNING SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS Signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis may include: Tender, warm, swollen joints Joint stiffness that is usually worse in the mornings and after inactivity Fatigue, fever and weight loss Early rheumatoid arthritis tends to affect your smaller joints first — particularly the joints that attach your fingers to your hands and your toes to your feet. As the disease progresses, symptoms often spread to the wrists, knees, ankles, elbows, hips and shoulders. In most cases, symptoms occur in the same joints on both sides of your body. About 40 percent of the people who have rheumatoid arthritis also experience signs and symptoms that don't involve the joints. Rheumatoid arthritis can affect many nonjoint structures, including: Skin Eyes Lungs Heart Kidneys Salivary glands Nerve tissue Bone marrow Blood vessels Rheumatoid arthritis signs and symptoms may vary in severity and may even come and go. Periods of increased disease activity, called flares, alternate with periods of relative remission — when the swelling and pain fade or disappear. Over time, rheumatoid arthritis can cause joints to deform and shift out of place. Subscribe to the channel, watch more videos, like or share a video and leave a comment. Thanks.
Views: 5015 STAY HEALTHY
Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment: 20 YEARS OF PREDNISONE
 
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20 years of prednisone! This video is about side effects I experience and side effects in the literature. Sorry about the length. Impossible to cover all the known side effects of short term and long term prednisone use in one video. I did not talk about all the known side effects. Follow links for more information. Further information can be found at the following links: Extensive list of side effects; http://dermnetnz.org/treatments/systemic-steroids.html Myopathy, myalgia, weakness; http://emedicine.medscape.com/article759487-overview National Library of Medicine contains many informative links; http://druginfo.nlm.nih.gov/drugportal Dementia: http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/actio... Dementia: http://www.neurology.org/content/47/6... John Hopkins Rheumatoid Medications overview; http://www.hopkinsarthritis.org/arthr... Vertebral Osteoporosis in females: http://rheumatology.oxfordjournals.or... You can PM me at carmensraacct@gmail.com My diagnosis: Rheumatoid Arthritis (1994) Mixed Connective Tissue Disease - Unspecified (2003) Degenerative Disc Disease (2004) Osteopenia (1996) Somataform Disorder (2008) Major Depressive Disorder (1995) Generalized Anxiety Disorder (1995) PTSD (2010) Chronic Insomnia (1996) Rosacea (2003) Chronic B12 Deficiency (2008) Chronic vitamin D Deficiency (2008) Iron Deficient Anemia (2016) Current Medications: Remicade Prednisone Gabapentin Seroquel Vitamin Supplements
Views: 5707 Carmen C
Living with Rheumatoid Arthritis
 
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Adam McCoy reports on a fitness instructor who is not letting rheumatoid arthritis stop her.
Views: 3034 CNN
Miracle of the Day in a BAD Case of Rheumatoid Arthritis
 
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Virtually miraculous instant result in a severe RA patient and follow up.
Views: 1799 RobertRowenMD
My RA Symptoms & Diagnosis: Jamie Navarette
 
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Jamie was only 18 when she noticed something didn’t seem right with her health. Hear about some of her first RA symptoms and her journey of getting diagnosed.
Views: 1070 Pfizer
Rheumatoid Arthritis | How to Diagnose RA | Third Age
 
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Rheumatoid Arthritis is often hard to diagnose, particularly in early stages when symptoms seem like normal aches and pains. There are many diseases for which RA can be mistaken, so how does your doctor accurately diagnose RA? Symptoms of RA include: swelling, redness, or warmth in 3 or more joints. Experiencing pain or stiffness within the first 30 minutes of waking up also is a consideration when diagnosing RA. With RA, joint pain appears to be symmetrical, affecting the same joint in both sides of the body. Talk to your doctor about where specifically you are experiencing pain, stiffness, or swelling, and be prepared for questions on other symptoms, so as to rule out other possible diseases. During a full physical examination, your physician will conduct a gentle squeeze test on your hands and feet to test unusual discomfort. They will also feel for rheumatoid nodules under the skin near affected joints, and may conduct further testing such as MRIs, X-rays, ultrasounds, and draw blood or synovial fluid for lab testing. RA can take up to a few weeks or months to diagnose. Physicians will identify whether you are experiencing benign or aggressive RA to discuss the most appropriate methods of treatment. For information on how RA is diagnosed, click the link above.
Views: 10475 Third Age
Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and Diagnosis
 
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This is a video series addresses Rheumatoid Arthritis and contains three videos. The first video gives a brief introduction to the disease, prevalence and diagnosis. The second video in the series further describes treatments and medications. Lastly, the final video discusses life style changes including diet that would help patients living with Rheumatoid Arthritis. This video was created by McMaster Demystifying Medicine students Coomal Rashid, Aisha Ikra Saeed, Shara Chowdhury, Manu Sharma Copyright McMaster University 2017 References: American College of Rheumatology . (2013, August). Rheumatoid Arthritis. Retrieved from http://www.rheumatology.org/I-Am-A/Patient-Caregiver/Diseases-Conditions/Rheumatoid-Arthritis Arthritis Foundation. (n.d.). Rheumatoid Arthritis Self-Care. Retrieved from http://www.arthritis.org/about-arthritis/types/rheumatoid-arthritis/self-care.php Lipsky, E. L., van der Heijde, D. M., St. Clair, E. W., Furst, D. E., Breedveld, F. C., Kalden, J. R., ... & Harriman, G. R. (2000). Infliximab and methotrexate in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. New England Journal of Medicine, 343(22), 1594-1602. Nogueira, E., Gomes, A., Preto, A., & Cavaco-Paulo, A. (2016). Update on Therapeutic Approaches for Rheumatoid Arthritis. Current Medicinal Chemistry, 23(21), 2190–2203. Rheumatoid arthritis. (2017). Retrieved from http://arthritis.ca/understand-arthritis/types-of-arthritis/rheumatoid-arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis. (2016, July 22). Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/arthritis/basics/rheumatoid.htm Shiel Jr., W. C. (n.d.). 15 Early Symptoms & Signs of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). Retrieved March 6, 2017, from http://www.medicinenet.com/rheumatoid_arthritis_early_symptoms/article.htm
Rheumatoid Arthritis | early ra treatment
 
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http://www.arthritistreatmentcenter.com Delaying treatment in RA can make a big difference… next RA Therapy: Study Supports Early Treatment Window Neil Osterweil writing in Medscape Today reported a study of more than 1200 patients treated with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) suggests that patients started on therapy within a few months of symptom onset will have more durable DMARD-free remissions than patients for whom therapy was delayed. The curve of the relationship is nonlinear, indicating the presence of a "window of opportunity" for ameliorating joint erosion, dampening inflammation, and reducing the need for orthopedic surgery, report Jessica A. B. van Nies, MD, from the Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, the Netherlands, and colleagues. The study was published in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases. Comment: Early treatment means remission. http://youtu.be/OYpQXbHZZVs
Views: 150 Nathan Wei
Rheumatoid Arthritis: Treatments
 
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This is a video series addresses Rheumatoid Arthritis and contains three videos. The first video gives a brief introduction to the disease, prevalence and diagnosis. The second video in the series further describes treatments and medications. Lastly, the final video discusses life style changes including diet that would help patients living with Rheumatoid Arthritis. This video was created by McMaster Demystifying Medicine students Coomal Rashid, Aisha Ikra Saeed, Shara Chowdhury, Manu Sharma Copyright McMaster University 2017 References: American College of Rheumatology . (2013, August). Rheumatoid Arthritis. Retrieved from http://www.rheumatology.org/I-Am-A/Patient-Caregiver/Diseases-Conditions/Rheumatoid-Arthritis Arthritis Foundation. (n.d.). Rheumatoid Arthritis Self-Care. Retrieved from http://www.arthritis.org/about-arthritis/types/rheumatoid-arthritis/self-care.php Lipsky, E. L., van der Heijde, D. M., St. Clair, E. W., Furst, D. E., Breedveld, F. C., Kalden, J. R., ... & Harriman, G. R. (2000). Infliximab and methotrexate in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. New England Journal of Medicine, 343(22), 1594-1602. Nogueira, E., Gomes, A., Preto, A., & Cavaco-Paulo, A. (2016). Update on Therapeutic Approaches for Rheumatoid Arthritis. Current Medicinal Chemistry, 23(21), 2190–2203. Rheumatoid arthritis. (2017). Retrieved from http://arthritis.ca/understand-arthritis/types-of-arthritis/rheumatoid-arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis. (2016, July 22). Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/arthritis/basics/rheumatoid.htm Shiel Jr., W. C. (n.d.). 15 Early Symptoms & Signs of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). Retrieved March 6, 2017, from http://www.medicinenet.com/rheumatoid_arthritis_early_symptoms/article.htm
9 Early Signs of Rheumatoid Arthritis (Should Not Be Ignored)
 
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9 Early Signs of Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disorder that causes chronic inflammation of joints. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) tends to begin slowly with minor symptoms that come and go, usually on both sides of the body, and progress over a period of weeks or months. Symptoms of this chronic disease vary from person to person and can change from day to day. Bouts of disease activity are called flare-ups, and inactive periods are called remission. --------------- - Click the link below & learn how to lose weight fast for women: 👉 https://bit.ly/2IkNFEE - 6 Week Pregnancy Weight Loss 👉 https://bit.ly/2IjspiW - Skin Whitening Forever 👉 https://bit.ly/2jAFpm1 --------------- If you find the video useful, feel free to share it with your friends and family. Thank You. Please subscribe to the channel: https://goo.gl/LBLVNP Our Social Media: * G+: https://goo.gl/2QULN3 * Twitter: https://twitter.com/goodhealthtw * Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lyvanthi22 - Tips for healthy: https://goo.gl/t1empX - Cure diabetes: https://goo.gl/zMX3Rh - Good health 24h: https://goo.gl/JTpJhx - Symptoms and Signs: https://goo.gl/XeDjp5 - Cure at home: https://goo.gl/Zeipjn - Gain weight in a week: https://goo.gl/18Mcbn - Home remedies for glowing skin: https://goo.gl/jXf82Y - Knee pain treatment at home: https://goo.gl/J9qPff -------------------- Disclaimer: The materials and the information contained on Good Health 24h channel are provided for general and educational purposes only and do not constitute any medical or other professional advice on any subject matter. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new diet or treatment and with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.
Views: 107 Good Health 24h
Rheumatoid Arthritis symptoms
 
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►Dr Morton's website: https://www.drmortons.co.uk ►Call us on: 012 123123123 Dr Morton's GP - Dr Natalie Moore discusses the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is an autoimmune disease where the body attacks itself, specifically the cartilage in the joints. Usually small joints are affected first, especially those in the hands and feet. New therapies are available that target an inflammatory molecule called TNF (tumour necrosis factor - named because it was first identified within a tumour even though later scientists found that it plays a role in many immune processes). Anti-TNF therapy has been very successful, and more treatments aimed at altering the incorrect immune responses are in the pipeline now. -------------------------------------------------------------------------- Want more information? ►Ligaments and joints: https://www.drmortons.co.uk/drm_production/services/sp_ligaments_joints.php ►Tendons and muscles: https://www.drmortons.co.uk/drm_production/services/sp_tendons_muscles.php ►Long term conditions: https://www.drmortons.co.uk/drm_development/services/lt_index.php Follow us! ►Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DrMortonsHelpline ►Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrMortons ►Google+: https://plus.google.com/+DrmortonsCoUk -------------------------------------------------------------------------- Dr Morton's - the medical helpline - aims to take the stress out of the NHS, by offering a service for busy people wanting speedy access to an experienced doctor. Callers can discuss the health problems that arise in their everyday lives and in most cases avoid the need to join a surgery queue or take time off work. Our doctors are also able to prescribe for a wide variety of medical issues and arrange for medication to be sent to the customer’s door. Dr Morton's doctors are all UK-based and GMC registered, and are regulated by the Care Quality Commission.
Severe Rheumatoid Arthritis
 
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Listen to this patient's story as he relays his experience with rheumatoid arthritis. He was told by numerous doctors there was nothing that could be done to help his RA and that he would be in a wheelchair within the year. However his spirit and wonderful support system has kept him on the move!
Recovering from Rheumatoid Arthritis with Clint Paddison: PYP 272
 
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http://plantyourself.com/272 Clint Paddison was pursuing a career as a stand-up comedian in Australia when he was struck with a debilitating case of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A former athlete and science all-star, Clint found himself almost unable to work, to move, to enjoy life. He discouraged his girlfriend from marrying him because he didn't want to ruin her life. (Spoiler: that's her in the photo :). At first, Clint followed the doctors' advice, and embarked on an aggressive pharmaceutical protocol that was almost as bad as the disease. Pain, disability, misery, and early death seemed the only path forward. Then, one day, he discovered a secret delivered via a poisoned cherry: fasting, induced by food poisoning, profoundly relieved his symptoms. Intrigued, Clint fired up his science brain and began searching for answers. He discovered a world of evidence, not taught in medical school, that diet and lifestyle can manage, stall, and even reverse severe cases of RA. He made it his mission to first heal himself, and then share what he had learned with the world. Now Clint runs the Paddison Program, an online training course dedicated to helping RA sufferers everywhere reverse their disease and lead happy, healthy, vibrant, fulfilled lives. Clint is not only wise and energetic and compassionate, but he's also funny as hell. I hope you enjoy our conversation as much as I have. We covered: our irrational calculus of risk and danger - are you more frightened of the box jellyfish or a cheeseburger? diet and exercise are not sexy getting struck by RA and living with unrelenting pain "you'll never have kids" going down the pharmaceutical route "Nobody gets better" putting comedy - and life - on hold "you can't debate the story" the big breakthrough: food poisoning from unwashed cherries eliminating symptoms through fasting the gift of Bikram yoga returning to his science roots the BLAAME for RA: bacterial overgrowth leaky gut acidosis acid deficiency in stomach mucosal lining depletion enzyme deficiency the dangers of NSAIDS how to avoid victim mentality - "treat the whole thing as a project" Clint's diet and lifestyle prescriptions the link between lifestyle and other autoimmune diseases and much more...
Views: 396 Plant Yourself
My First Vlog on My Rheumatoid Arthritis
 
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Hey everyone! This is my first vlog! I just wanted to reintroduce myself. This account is going to be dedicated to sharing my story with rheumatoid arthritis, things I've done to help me, what didn't work, motivation, my diet, and answering all your questions. It all started on my Instagram account, Turning_pain_n2_purpose. I documented my journey to heal RA naturally, from a paleo diet, to my current plant based diet. I've become super passionate about a plant based diet , not only for health reasons, but for environmental reasons and animal rights. I have an interview up on Youtube with Clint Paddison. In that interview, I go into detail about my diagnosis and health transformation through a plant based diet. I'm excited to share my story piece by piece, so I can give some hope to the disease. Thanks for the support! Looking forward to talking with some of you! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0unvSXUjid8
Views: 5292 Erika Cline
Rheumatoid Arthritis Of Hands: Symptoms, Signs, Treatment
 
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Source: https://www.epainassist.com Rheumatoid Arthritis Of Hands: It is an inflammatory joint disease that affects small and big joint. Know its symptoms, signs, tests and treatment by watching video in 3D. Related Articles: Rheumatoid Arthritis of Hands: Symptoms, Signs, Treatment http://www.epainassist.com/hands/rheumatoid-arthritis-of-hands
Views: 147724 ePainAssist
rheumatoid arthritis prognosis
 
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Dear friend if you want more information through this link: http://alltoparticles.blogspot.com/ or http://perfectweightloss13.blogspot.com/ Rheumatoid arthritis prognosis According to the ' American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons ( SÃO ) , there are three types of arthritis. Doctors classify juvenile arthritis according to the number of joints affected , the symptoms and the presence of antibodies in the blood . Rheumatoid arthritis prognosis 1 - Antiparticle - is so named because only one joint is usually affected . Hitting girls under 8 years old Knee, ankle and wrist are the most commonly affected The fingers of the hands Rheumatoid arthritis prognosis and feet are rarely affected The symptoms are very mild Sometimes three or four joints may be involved The eyes should be checked regularly to prevent blindness due to persistent inflammation of the eyes 2 - Arthritis - four or five joints may be involved About 30% of children suffer from this type of arthritis Girls are more often affected Children with IM antibodies have the most severe form of the disease 3 - systemic- a fever of at least 102 Rheumatoid arthritis prognosis degrees daily for two weeks suggest this type of juvenile arthritis . The symptoms include swelling of the pain and stiffness Inflammation of the heart, Rheumatoid arthritis prognosis liver, lymph nodes and spleen Some children develop arthritis in adults reason According to SÃO juvenile arthritis is an autoimmune disease . No one knows the exact cause. Juvenile arthritis is not an inherited disease. The joint becomes inflamed Public stiffened Rheumatoid arthritis prognosis The growth of the city has changed history The first case of juvenile arthritis in 1879 and is considered a relatively modern disease . prognosis The evolution of juvenile arthritis can be good if the following instructions. The British Journal of Nutrition in 2000 reported a possible link between unhealthy fats and increasing pain and stiffness in people with arthritis. They blamed it on a substance called nitrites used to cure and preserve various meats . Rheumatoid arthritis prognosis Saturated fats are found in red meats , dark meat poultry , whole milk, cream Rheumatoid arthritis prognosis , cheese and tropical oils . http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&URLs=en&q=The+role+of+nutrition+in+juvenile+arthritis&IE=UT-8&one=UT-8. My results are consistent with this article and suggest a more specific food mentioned here as the main cause of arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis prognosis
Early Treatment Means Better Prognosis in Rheumatoid Arthritis
 
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Here’s the proof about treating arthritis early Early Treatment Equals Better Results for Rheumatoid Arthritis Alan Mozes writing for Healthday reported treating rheumatoid arthritis early may make for better outcomes, a new study suggests. Patients who were treated within six months of developing the first signs of the autoimmune disease did better in the long run and were less likely to suffer early death, British researchers found. The findings stem from an analysis of more than 600 patients who were initially diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) between 1990 and 1994. They were tracked for over 20 years. Over the study time frame, investigators assessed key symptoms of RA, such as swollen and/or tender joints, and indications of disability. All deaths were also noted. The research team found that patients who started treatment for RA within the first half-year after the first symptoms surfaced tended to have no greater levels of disability over a 20-year period than patients who required no treatment. Comment: It is critical to be aggressive with this disease. Description
Views: 95 Nathan Wei
Arthritis: 8 Early Warning Signs
 
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Arthritis: 8 Early Warning Signs Some forms of arthritis (there are more than 100) can strike anytime, but most often arthritis begins to happen to people in their late 40s or early 50s. The sooner you realize (and accept) that it's happening to you, the soooner you can take steps to protect your joints against a fture featuring persistent pain -- or permanent damage The most common early warning signs and symptoms follow. Typically, these can come and go over time. #1 Morning stiffness. This is a classic symptom. The longer it takes to "loosen up" after you get out of bed, the more likely it is that you're developing arthritis. #2 Going up or down stairs becomes uncomfortable or even painful. You may feel stabs of pain in a knee, or the joint may occasionally lock. #3: Sudden, sharp,stabbing pain in a big toe. This is a symptom of gout, the second-most common form of arthritis and the most common type of inflammatory arthritis. The toe joint will also look red, and feel warm and and tender when you touch it. #4 Fatigue and flu-like symptoms. Many people don't realize that arthritis can cause chronic tiredness, loss of appetite, weight loss, anemia, and/or fever -- just like the flu. #5 Frequent soreness or pain in the hands, making them uncomfortable to use sometimes. Things like buttoning a shirt, tying shoelaces, turning a key in a lock, grasping a doorknob, snapping fingers cause discomfort or even sharp stabs of pain. #6 Bumps appear on fingers. Excess bone grows in joints causing reduced flexibility, disfiguration or deformity at the joints. The joint is probably also stiff to move, although not necessarily painful. Sometimes this excess bone (known as a bone spur) happens in the toes too. #7 Chronic pain discourages you from participating in activities you normally enjoy. You start avoiding family events or other activities you feel worn down by chronic pain. #8 Pain disrupts sleep patterns. Either you have trouble falling asleep, or pain wakes you up during the night. Early warning signs of arthritis can sometimes be deceptive for those who are physically active. You may think you didn't warm up enough, or "worked out too hard" when soreness or stiffness appear. But, in fact, it may be an indication that arthritis has begun.
Views: 14801 WS Westwood
Symptoms during early stage of Knee Arthritis and treatment - Dr. Deepak Inamdar
 
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Patients with early stage of Knee Arthritis come to me at the age of 35 to 40 years, they are mainly youngsters who are gone to the gym or to a trek and they come with knee pain. There are another group of youngsters who come with rheumatoid arthritis, a little bit younger may be 30 to 35 years. These patients often come with pain on the inner aspect of the knee, swelling on the knee, a little bit of stiffness. So these are the main symptoms of Knee Arthritis. The main treatment for this early Arthritis is, it can be depicted by the mnemonic RICE meaning rest, ice, compression and elevation. Rest means stop the patient from doing those activities for 2 to 3 weeks Which gives them comfort. Ice the part or knee for around 10 to 15 minutes duration, 3 to 5 times a day with the help of gel packs, give some sort of compression as in crape compression and some amount of elevation this along with some amount of anti inflammatory medication and Physiotherapy should help the patient get back to his normal activities. One should know that this early Arthritis is quite common among youngsters. It is seen between 35 to 40 years because that's the age when the degeneration of the knee starts or setting it. So after a trek, a hill climb or a marathon these sort of pains are quite common there is nothing to get worried about this phenomenon.
Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis for USMLE
 
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Simple Explanation of Juvenile Rhumatoid Arthritis (JRA) for USMLE. Focusing on the Signs and Symptoms, clinical presentaiton, Diagnosis, Treatment and Management. In particular Oligoaruticular, Pauciarticular, Polyarticular, Systemic, Enthesitis and Psoriatic Arthritis. Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis is classified into 5 categories. The first category is oligoarticular or Pauci articular JA. Then there is polyarticular Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis. This is divided into subgroups depending on Rheumatoid Factor. Rhematoid Factor positive is also referred to as Early Onset Adult Rheumatoid Arthritis. Systemic Rheumatoid Arthritis, Enthesitis is not necessarily the joints but actually the tendon. Finally there is Psoriatic. Most common is oligoartiruclar (40%). RF postivie is more than RF-. Systemic 10-20% and the other is very rare. Oligoarticular Rhematoid Arthritis is when there is less than 4 joints within 6 months. If there is move than 4 joints, but takes longer than 6 months, then this is known as extended. This tends to be slightly more severe. Polyarticular is have more than 5 joints involved within 6 months. Systemic there is more than 5 jointsh within 6 months and there are systemic symptoms. Enthesitis is related to the tendon-bone attachment. FInally Psoriatic is related to a rash. Oligoarticular is less than 8 years, Rhematoid Factor Negative is found in 8-12 years old and Rheumatoid Factor Positive occurs in greater than 13 years old. Systemic can occur in any age group. Joints involved in Oligarticular hte knee is the most common, also affected is the ankle. Typically associated with morning stiffness and swollen joints. Hip involvement is unusual. Rhematoid Factor Negative Polyaritcular. Large and Small joints of hands and feets such as knee, ankles, and wrists. Temporomandivular joint and spine is also much more common joint. No HIP invovlement Rheumatoid Factor Positive is similar to Adult Rheumatoid Arthritis so it is symettrical and very aggressive. Systemic can be any joint. Enthesitis there is sacroiliac and spinal pain and stiffness Psoriatic is primarily Finger (Dactylitis) Uveitis is a very serious and common symptom. Oligoarticular Rheumatoid Arthritis can cause Iriditis. Also Enthesitis and Psoriatic which also has Anterior Uveitis. Psoriatic is painful whereas in Oligarticular is painless. Therefore you must do slit lamp to preven blindness, cataracts, glaucoma. Treatment with glucocorticoids and mydriatics. All of these are associated with ANA Positive. Rheumatoid Factor Negative does not have extra articular symptoms. However, in Rheumatoid Factor Positive there are classic Rheumatoid Nodules, vasculitis and lung disease and continue to adult Rheumatoid Arthritis. Systemic Rheumatoid Arthritis is difficult to diagnose because systemic symptoms may occur months before there are any joint involvement. The most important is associated with a fever and rash that goes away when there is fever. Salmon colored, erythematous and maculopapular. Serositis (pleuritis and Pericarditis lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly). There are some lab findings such as High ESR and elevated WBC and platelets. There is anemia and Elevated LFT. Macrophage Activating Syndrome (MAS). INcrease Macrophage, T Cell, Interferon Gamma, GM-CSF. You must rule out infection and malignancy. In Enthesitis there must be two of the following. First there must be sacroiliac tenderness and/or spinal pain. HLA B27, Family History if there is a history of primary or secondary relative. Associated Anterior Uveitis. Greater than 8 years old and if they are a boy. The prognosis of Enthesitis is good. Psoriatic Arthritis. Salmon colored lesion. It has a variable course with remissions and exacerbations. Diagnostic Criteria. Firstly, 6 weeks of persistent swollen joint. Must be less than 16 years old. Diagnosis of Exclusion so you must exclude septic arthritis. No test to rule out or confirm Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis therefore it is difficult to diagnose. Treatment is physiotherapy to maintain range of motion and avoid contractions. Multi-Discipline team effort of physiotherapist, social worker, orthopedic, ophthlamologist, Rheumatologist and possibly a pediatrician. Medications are NSAIDs and Intra-Articular corticosteroids and injections into joint that helps eliminate pain. Can't give for too long becuase it destroys the joint tissue. Disease Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs. Methotrexate. Biologic Agents such as etanercepts, Adalimumab, Infliximab
Views: 8718 the study spot
Living With Rheumatoid Arthritis For 21+ Years [Personal Story]
 
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Living with Rheumatoid Arthritis Interview at http://rapainmanagement.com/living-with-rheumatoid-arthritis/ SUBSCRIBE. RATE. COMMENT. In her personal story about living with rheumatoid arthritis, Jenn shares what its been like living with RA for the last 21 years – the good, the bad, the ugly – and specifically she shares about her daily battles with the disease and how she manages her arthritis pain most effectively. --------------------------------------------- Krysti: Hi I’m Krysti and I’m here with Jenn. The reason for recording this audio-video is to share a real-life story about living with rheumatoid arthritis and what it means to be diagnosed with RA. We’ll talk about some of the struggles and the successes that happen with the disease, from a personal account. So the goal is to be able to chat with you Jenn and to talk a little bit about what it’s been like through your journey. That way people who are dealing with some of the same challenges can relate to your story and recognize that they’re not alone in their journey through this disease. So first and foremost, I want to tell your story, so maybe you can start out by telling me how you found out that you had RA. How old were you? What was it like in the beginning. Jenn: Okay, I was fourteen and I felt like I had jammed my finger. My finger joint swelled up and it was probably for, I don’t know, a week or two and then I realized it’s probably not a jammed finger, maybe something’s wrong, maybe it’s broken, I don’t know. So I told my mom and then my mom took me to the doctor and our primary care doctor, my pediatrician, said that she thought it was juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and that she was going to send me to a rheumatologist. She said, that even though I hadn’t presented all the symptoms for RA…I think you have to have symptoms for like six months, or for a certain amount of time before they’ll actually send you to a rheumatologist, she said that that’s what she pretty much thought it was. So they sent me right away to the rheumatologist and did blood work and urine tests and everything like that and confirmed that it was JRA. Krysti: So you were fourteen when that happened? Jenn: Yes. Krysti: So when you went to the doctor to get the blood tests and everything, did they tell you about your diagnosis, did you have to come back? Tell me a little bit about that process, if somebody is experiencing symptoms now and they’re curious about what it’s like to go to the doctor, what to expect, I’m sure things change over time, but what was that like for you? Jenn: Yeah I think it’s probably a lot different now than it was back then but essentially my pediatrician just said, “You have juvenile rheumatoid arthritis,” and I had no idea what that was and what it even meant. So it didn’t even click or mean anything to me at that point in time. I just went home and somebody said, “What’s wrong?” and I said, “I have arthritis,” and went about my day. So it didn’t really have any effect on me then, the physical symptoms weren’t bad enough then for me to realize what an impact it was going to have, but it didn’t take long for the physical symptoms to come. Probably within a month, maybe two months is when all the physical symptoms started getting really bad. For example, I couldn’t open the truck door to get in the car and I couldn’t open a milk jug and going upstairs was really hard because my knees had gotten so swollen. So, it was little things like that started happening in my daily life, then I started realizing that everything is different. Website: http://www.rapainmanagement.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RAPainManagement Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/100914534865792217968/+Rapainmanagement Subscribe to RA Pain Management on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/RAPainManagement
Views: 36045 RA Pain Management
Rheumatoid Arthritis Pain Treatment: Tramadol / Ultram
 
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My experience using Tramadol for Rheumatoid Arthritis Pain. Although this medication works pretty well for me, one drawback that I forgot to mention is that it takes over an hour to kick in, and really two hours before it reaches its full effect. This is another reason I take it first thing in the morning. If I wake up much earlier than I plan to get up, I will take 100mg and go back to sleep. This way it is working by the time I get up. For more information on mechanism of action, dosing and side effects please go the websites below: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tramadol http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3527878/ Pain Treatment in Arthritis-Related Pain: Beyond NSAIDs. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16741783 Update on guidelines for the treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain. You can PM me at carmensraacct@gmail.com My diagnosis: Rheumatoid Arthritis (1994) Mixed Connective Tissue Disease - Unspecified (2003) Degenerative Disc Disease (2004) Somataform Disorder (2008) Major Depressive Disorder (1995) Generalized Anxiety Disorder (1995) PTSD (2010) Rosacea (2003) Chronic B12 Deficiency (2008) Chronic vitamin D Deficiency (2008) Iron Deficient Anemia (2016) Current Medications: Remicade Prednisone Gabapentin Seroquel Vitamin Supplements
Views: 2541 Carmen C
7 Treatment Options for Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis
 
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7 Treatment Options for Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis 1. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) Upon receiving a juvenile rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis, many patients will be prescribed medications to help them cope with the often painful condition. The first and most accessible type of medication prescribed to these individuals is nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, otherwise known as NSAIDs. As the name suggests, NSAIDs are designed to alleviate the symptoms associated with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis by reducing inflammation, in this case of the joints. Many NSAIDs are available over the counter, meaning they don’t even require a prescription. Examples include ibuprofen (Advil and Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve). Side effects, which are generally minimal, include nausea and issues with the liver. 2. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) Should a young patient dealing with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis require something more powerful to combat the pain associated with this condition, their family doctor may prescribe disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, or DMARDs. Examples of DMARDs include methotrexate (Trexall) and sulfasalazine (Azulfidine). Sometimes a physician will encourage their patient to take DMARDs in addition to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs. And while DMARDs are generally more potent than NSAIDs, the side effects are fairly similar: upset stomach and, should they be taken in excess, liver issues. 3. Tumor necrosis factor blockers (TNFs) Tumor necrosis factor blockers are often prescribed by doctors to patients suffering from the effects of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. That’s because TNFs can effectively restrict many of the symptoms associated with the condition, from stiffness in the morning hours to the late-day pain of swollen joints. Unfortunately, tumor necrosis factor blockers have more significant side effects than non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which can cause nausea in some patients. Unlike NSAIDs, TNFs increase the chance that a patient will suffer from even more substantial health problems, including cancers like lymphoma. For this reason, doctors may not prescribe TNFs unless the case of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is considered particularly serious and painful. 4. Immune system suppressants You could hardly blame someone for wondering why on earth a physician would prescribe medications designed to actually suppress the activity of a person’s immune system if they’re fighting a painful condition like juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. But there’s a good reason physicians turn to these types of medication: because they can effectively limit the chance that the immune system of a juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patient will attack healthy cells and intensify the condition. There are a number of prevalent immune system suppressants, including abatacept (Orencia), rituximab (Rituxin), anakinra (Kineret) and tocilizumab (Actemra). Like TNFs, they do come with some significant potential side effects, including general infection to cancer. 5. Corticosteroids A far more potent way to counteract the symptoms of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis involves using corticosteroid medications, such as prednisone. Corticosteroids are often prescribed by a doctor while their patient waits for disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs to take effect. Should corticosteroid medications be prescribed, chances are they will be in use for only a short time. This is because these drugs have been shown to cause growth difficulties and increase the chances of infection. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patients using corticosteroids will receive these drugs orallyy or through an injection into a problematic joint. 6. Physical therapy Many older adults struggling with rheumatoid arthritis find that physical therapy can help in alleviating joint and muscle pain. The situation is no different for those dealing with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, which affects children under age 17 — physical therapists and occupational therapists have a variety of exercises that can improve range of motion, enhance muscle tone, and help young patients overcome restricted flexibility and reduce pain and swelling. Additionally, a physical therapist or occupational therapist may provide a child with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis with protective equipment or exercise equipment that can help them build strength when at home; for example, joint supports and splints can help protect painful joints and improve overall functionality.
Views: 45 HEALTH AREA
7 Treatment Options for Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis
 
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7 Treatment Options for Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis 1. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) Upon receiving a juvenile rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis, many patients will be prescribed medications to help them cope with the often painful condition. The first and most accessible type of medication prescribed to these individuals is nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, otherwise known as NSAIDs. As the name suggests, NSAIDs are designed to alleviate the symptoms associated with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis by reducing inflammation, in this case of the joints. Many NSAIDs are available over the counter, meaning they don’t even require a prescription. Examples include ibuprofen (Advil and Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve). Side effects, which are generally minimal, include nausea and issues with the liver. 2. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) Should a young patient dealing with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis require something more powerful to combat the pain associated with this condition, their family doctor may prescribe disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, or DMARDs. Examples of DMARDs include methotrexate (Trexall) and sulfasalazine (Azulfidine). Sometimes a physician will encourage their patient to take DMARDs in addition to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs. And while DMARDs are generally more potent than NSAIDs, the side effects are fairly similar: upset stomach and, should they be taken in excess, liver issues. 3. Tumor necrosis factor blockers (TNFs) Tumor necrosis factor blockers are often prescribed by doctors to patients suffering from the effects of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. That’s because TNFs can effectively restrict many of the symptoms associated with the condition, from stiffness in the morning hours to the late-day pain of swollen joints. Unfortunately, tumor necrosis factor blockers have more significant side effects than non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which can cause nausea in some patients. Unlike NSAIDs, TNFs increase the chance that a patient will suffer from even more substantial health problems, including cancers like lymphoma. For this reason, doctors may not prescribe TNFs unless the case of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is considered particularly serious and painful. 4. Immune system suppressants You could hardly blame someone for wondering why on earth a physician would prescribe medications designed to actually suppress the activity of a person’s immune system if they’re fighting a painful condition like juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. But there’s a good reason physicians turn to these types of medication: because they can effectively limit the chance that the immune system of a juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patient will attack healthy cells and intensify the condition. There are a number of prevalent immune system suppressants, including abatacept (Orencia), rituximab (Rituxin), anakinra (Kineret) and tocilizumab (Actemra). Like TNFs, they do come with some significant potential side effects, including general infection to cancer. 5. Corticosteroids A far more potent way to counteract the symptoms of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis involves using corticosteroid medications, such as prednisone. Corticosteroids are often prescribed by a doctor while their patient waits for disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs to take effect. Should corticosteroid medications be prescribed, chances are they will be in use for only a short time. This is because these drugs have been shown to cause growth difficulties and increase the chances of infection. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patients using corticosteroids will receive these drugs orally or through an injection into a problematic joint. 6. Physical therapy Many older adults struggling with rheumatoid arthritis find that physical therapy can help in alleviating joint and muscle pain. The situation is no different for those dealing with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, which affects children under age 17 — physical therapists and occupational therapists have a variety of exercises that can improve range of motion, enhance muscle tone, and help young patients overcome restricted flexibility and reduce pain and swelling. Additionally, a physical therapist or occupational therapist may provide a child with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis with protective equipment or exercise equipment that can help them build strength when at home; for example, joint supports and splints can help protect painful joints and improve overall functionality. Like, Comment, Subscribe and invite all your friends to see our videos. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfR3Y90G-fFDYI6i7E7xPBQ
Views: 25 HEALTH ZONE
Rheumatoid Arthritis Part I
 
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Rheumatoid arthritis affects 1.3 million Americans. Research advances and drug development have helped control this chronic disease. Noted UCLA Rheumatology expert Dr. Michael Weisman, presents an update on the latest treatments in the first of two lectures. More detail http://www.jointpainanswer.com/ucla-lecture-rheumatoid-arthritis
Views: 653 Agelshopping
Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA): Pathology & Clinical Presentation – Pediatrics | Lecturio
 
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This video “Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (Part 1)” is part of the Lecturio course “Pediatrics” ► WATCH the complete course on http://lectur.io/jia1 ► LEARN ABOUT: - Juvenile idiopathic arthritis - a case study - Pathology of JIA - Several very different types of JIA - JIA characteristics - Progression of symptoms - Types of JIA - Chronic destruction of knee joints - Historical findings ► THE PROF: Your tutor is Brian Alverson, MD. He is the Director for the Division of Pediatric Hospital Medicine at Hasbro Children's Hospital and Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Brown University in Providence, RI. He has been active in pediatric education and research for 15 years and has won over 25 teaching awards at two Ivy League Medical Schools. Dr. Alverson has extensive experience in preparing students for the USMLE exams and has test writing experience as well. ► LECTURIO is your single-point resource for medical school: Study for your classes, USMLE Step 1, USMLE Step 2, MCAT or MBBS with video lectures by world-class professors, recall & USMLE-style questions and textbook articles. Create your free account now: http://lectur.io/jia1 ► INSTALL our free Lecturio app iTunes Store: https://app.adjust.com/z21zrf Play Store: https://app.adjust.com/b01fak ► READ TEXTBOOK ARTICLES related to this video: http://lectur.io/jialibrary ► SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel: http://lectur.io/subscribe ► WATCH MORE ON YOUTUBE: http://lectur.io/playlists ► LET’S CONNECT: • Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lecturio.medical.education.videos • Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lecturio_medical_videos • Twitter: https://twitter.com/LecturioMed
RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS | SYMPTOMS | TREATMENT| DIAGNOSIS |  DR VENU GOPAL
 
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SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE VIDEOS https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCk2B6glhQa1L7XwWKNIeOoA?sub_confirmation=1 AYURVEDIC DOCTORS IN HYDERABAD,AYURVEDIC SPECIALIST IN HYDERABAD,AYURVEDIC DR T VENU GOPAL,RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS EARLY SYMPTOMS,DIET FOR PERSONS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS,EARLY SYMPTOMS OF RA,FIRST SYMPTOMS RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS,TREATMENT FOR RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS,ARTHRITIS IN FINGERS SYMPTOMS,FOODS GOOD FOR ARTHRITIS,METHOTREXATE,RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS DIET,RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS IN FEET,DIETS FOR PEOPLE WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS,COMMON SYMPTOMS FOR RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS,PROGNOSIS FOR RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS,FOODS TO AVOID WITH ARTHRITIS,OSTEOARTHRITIS,LUPUS SYMPTOMS,DR. T. VENU GOPAL
Views: 3029 CARE AND CURE
Reverse Rheumatoid Arthritis with Natural Medicine - Dr. Barker, ND
 
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Naturopathic Doctor Simon Barker - http://www.ParacelsusLA.com - explains how Naturopathic medicine, a subset of alternative medicine (or natural medicine), is able to reverse Rheumatoid Arthritis. Produced by Larry Cook. My Natural Health Book on Amazon: http://goo.gl/3ILiqS My Healthy Recipe DVD on Amazon: http://goo.gl/DJrXAo My Natural Living Website: http://goo.gl/eXCpiK My Autism Recovery Website: http://goo.gl/CsuatG arthritis rheumatoid rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis joint arthritis pain rheumatoid arthritis pain arthritis joint pain symptoms arthritis treatment arthritis knee arthritis psoriatic arthritis arthritis relief rheumatoid arthritis symptoms rheumatoid arthritis treatment rheumatoid arthritis diet arthritis treatments osteoarthritis treatment inflammatory arthritis degenerative arthritis reactive arthritis juvenile rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis disease lupus rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis rheumatoid osteoarthritis osteo arthritis rheumatoid arthritis osteoarthritis rheumatoid arthritis relief rheumatoid arthritis remedies rheumatoid arthritis treatments rheumatoid arthritis hip rhumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis natural remedies rheumatoid arthritis knee pain rheumatoid arthritis foot pain rheumatoid arthritis cause rheumatoid arthritis neck rheumatoid arthritis therapy fibromyalgia rheumatoid arthritis treatment for rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis wrist causes rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis shoulder rheumatoid arthritis spine what is rheumatoid arthritis rheumatiod arthritis rheumatoid arthritis test rheumatoid arthritis pictures osteoarthritis treatments rheumatoid arthritis hands treatment of rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis information rheumatoid arthritis research rheumatoid arthritis elbow reumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis support osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis fatigue rheumatoid arthritis factor rheumatoid arthritis symptom about rheumatoid arthritis signs of rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis management rheumatoid factor arthritis rheumatoid athritis rheumatoid arthritus treatments for rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis feet rheumatoid arthritis joints rheumatoid arthritis cures diet for rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis nutrition rheumatoid arthiritis living with rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis food causes of rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis vs osteoarthritis rheumatory arthritis rheumatoid arthritis early symptoms severe rheumatoid arthritis rumatoid arthritis pictures of rheumatoid arthritis management of rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis swelling rheumatoid arthritis fingers rheumatoid arthritis statistics cause of rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis info cures for rheumatoid arthritis diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis information on rheumatoid arthritis signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis natural remedies for rheumatoid arthritis history of rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis photos rheumatoid arthritis psoriasis rheumatoid arthritis alternative medicine rheumatoid arthritis blood tests onset of rheumatoid arthritis natural cures for rheumatoid arthritis
Views: 48610 LarryCook333
Foods That Can Make Rheumatoid Arthritis Worse
 
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TWITTER @healthytipsYT FOR MORE VIDEOS HERE : www.youtube.com/channel/UCfde9RdL6VGTEAd2dHnNC_Q PLAYLIST HERE : PREVENTIVE AND STAY HEALTHY : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLDutF5b9TlGv2Z7VGEky4FbUYZO4pALHf TIPS AND TRICKS : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLDutF5b9TlGsPWotjaqqQSkxFQeeSrrlW BEAUTY HAIR - SKIN AND FACE : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLDutF5b9TlGsfgfwBG1ZdHGsvmMtPA8ST DIET - WEIGHT LOSS : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLDutF5b9TlGuFtT4-VVScAYW2ipnkkerH NATURAL CURES - HOME REMEDIES : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLDutF5b9TlGtNCl3JO6OJOHzLt1vChFK3 ====================================================== Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease where the body is actually destroying its own cells. Certain foods are thought to be inflammatory, which may increase the damaging immune activity. Avoiding certain food groups may help to decrease the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. 1 - Gluten: A protein complex contained primarily in wheat, but also in some other grain products such as barley and rye. Gluten allergy contributes to the development of an inflammatory condition known as celiac disease, which has led natural health practitioners to propose that elimination of gluten from the diet will help with other inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Elimination of gluten grain-based foods such as wheat breads, pastas and pastries may decrease the chance of increased inflammation. Products such as rice, corn and legume-based flours may be substituted. 2 - Dairy. Dairy products are known to cause lactose intolerance in people who cannot digest the milk sugar. One of the first mechanisms of the immune system is the presence of IgE in the digestive tract, so consumption of a food that is not well tolerated may increase the activity of inflammatory processes and the immune system. In addition, dairy products contain the protein casein, which may be intolerable for some people. Substitution of dairy products with soy-based products such as soy milk- yogurt and cheeses may be advisable. 3 - Red Meat and Poultry: Red meat and poultry are high in omega-6 fatty acids, which have been shown to increase inflammation. On the other hand, omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to reduce inflammation. Reducing the amount of red meat and poultry in the diet and replacing it with oily, meaty fish high in omega-3 fatty acids such as salmon or tuna may help to reduce inflammation. 4 - Nightshade Vegetables: Nightshade vegetables including tomatoes, peppers and potatoes are thought by some to increase inflammatory responses in the body. Though no clinical studies are yet available in 2010 to support this claim, some claim to have experienced relief by eliminating nightshade vegetables from the diet. 5 - Refined Sugars: Excessive consumption of refined sugars, including white sugar, brown sugar and corn syrup, may increase the acidity of the body. Some natural health practitioners have recommended that refined sugar be avoided in cases of inflammatory disease such as rheumatoid arthritis. Substitution with natural sugar alternatives such as stevia, agave nectar, fruit juice concentrates and honey may help to reduce inflammatory processes. An overall reduction of any type of sugar can also be recommended to avoid rapid increases in blood sugar, which may interfere with inflammatory processes. 6 - Fried and processed foods: Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai report, "cutting back on the consumption of processed and fried foods, which are high in toxins called Advanced Glycation End products , can reduce inflammation and actually help restore the body’s natural defenses regardless of age or health status." 7 - Excess salt: Arthritis Today reports Americans consume more than eight times more salt than what the body actually needs which can result in water retention, dehydration, and hypertension. "People with rheumatoid arthritis may be at higher risk for salt’s effects. rheumatoid arthritis can cause coronary arteries to become inflamed, increasing the risk of hypertension. Corticosteroids, commonly used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, cause the body to retain more sodium." It has been reported that salt can act as a trigger food and can make the symptoms of arthritis worse.
Views: 2381 Healthy Tips
What is Rheumatoid arthritis ? How to diagnosis it in Hindi by Dr.I.Ansari.
 
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Hi viewer , is video me Dr.I.Ansari ne bataya hai ki Rheumatoid arthritis kya hai , iske lakshan kya hai , is bimari ko kis prakar manage kiya ja sakta hai. Iske alava , is video me bole gaye kuchh important bato ko screen par likh kar bhi bataya gaya hai, taaki darshako ke liye Rheumatoid arthritis ko samajhna aasan ho. Connect us on : Facebook page :-- https://goo.gl/aDATGB
Views: 10511 Dr.I. Ansari
Immunology of the rheumatoid joint
 
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Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory disease that mainly affects the joints in which the body's immune system attacks its own tissues. This animation produced by Nature Reviews Immunology and Nature Reviews Rheumatology guides us through the immune pathways involved in the disease, from the first signs of self-reactive immune cells to joint damage and other symptoms, and highlights opportunities for new treatments. Nature Reviews Immunology (http://www.nature.com/nri) and Nature Reviews Rheumatology (http://www.nature.com/nrrheum) have full responsibility for all editorial content. This content is editorially independent of sponsors.
Views: 42033 nature video
7 Treatment Options for Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis
 
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7 Treatment Options for Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis 1. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) Upon receiving a juvenile rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis, many patients will be prescribed medications to help them cope with the often painful condition. The first and most accessible type of medication prescribed to these individuals is nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, otherwise known as NSAIDs. As the name suggests, NSAIDs are designed to alleviate the symptoms associated with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis by reducing inflammation, in this case of the joints. Many NSAIDs are available over the counter, meaning they don’t even require a prescription. Examples include ibuprofen (Advil and Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve). Side effects, which are generally minimal, include nausea and issues with the liver. 2. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) Should a young patient dealing with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis require something more powerful to combat the pain associated with this condition, their family doctor may prescribe disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, or DMARDs. Examples of DMARDs include methotrexate (Trexall) and sulfasalazine (Azulfidine). Sometimes a physician will encourage their patient to take DMARDs in addition to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs. And while DMARDs are generally more potent than NSAIDs, the side effects are fairly similar: upset stomach and, should they be taken in excess, liver issues. 3. Tumor necrosis factor blockers (TNFs) Tumor necrosis factor blockers are often prescribed by doctors to patients suffering from the effects of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. That’s because TNFs can effectively restrict many of the symptoms associated with the condition, from stiffness in the morning hours to the late-day pain of swollen joints. Unfortunately, tumor necrosis factor blockers have more significant side effects than non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which can cause nausea in some patients. Unlike NSAIDs, TNFs increase the chance that a patient will suffer from even more substantial health problems, including cancers like lymphoma. For this reason, doctors may not prescribe TNFs unless the case of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is considered particularly serious and painful. 4. Immune system suppressants You could hardly blame someone for wondering why on earth a physician would prescribe medications designed to actually suppress the activity of a person’s immune system if they’re fighting a painful condition like juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. But there’s a good reason physicians turn to these types of medication: because they can effectively limit the chance that the immune system of a juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patient will attack healthy cells and intensify the condition. There are a number of prevalent immune system suppressants, including abatacept (Orencia), rituximab (Rituxin), anakinra (Kineret) and tocilizumab (Actemra). Like TNFs, they do come with some significant potential side effects, including general infection to cancer. 5. Corticosteroids A far more potent way to counteract the symptoms of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis involves using corticosteroid medications, such as prednisone. Corticosteroids are often prescribed by a doctor while their patient waits for disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs to take effect. Should corticosteroid medications be prescribed, chances are they will be in use for only a short time. This is because these drugs have been shown to cause growth difficulties and increase the chances of infection. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patients using corticosteroids will receive these drugs orally or through an injection into a problematic joint. 6. Physical therapy Many older adults struggling with rheumatoid arthritis find that physical therapy can help in alleviating joint and muscle pain. The situation is no different for those dealing with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, which affects children under age 17 — physical therapists and occupational therapists have a variety of exercises that can improve range of motion, enhance muscle tone, and help young patients overcome restricted flexibility and reduce pain and swelling. Additionally, a physical therapist or occupational therapist may provide a child with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis with protective equipment or exercise equipment that can help them build strength when at home; for example, joint supports and splints can help protect painful joints and improve overall functionality. See Our Another Vedeos: 1. Signs and Symptoms of Fibromyalgia,....: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNrjXC3jMfI Subcribe my chanel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYWEoxZsBePnM-qQ3b5Ew9g?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 29 Health Zone +
Rheumatoid arthritis | ra kidney disease
 
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http://www.arthritistreatmentcenter.com If you have RA, make sure your doc checks your kidneys. Find out why… next RA Puts Kidneys at Risk Marianne Wait writing for Arthritis Today reported people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are almost 5 percent more likely than other people to develop reduced kidney function, a sign of chronic kidney disease, according to a study published recently in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases. Although that figure may not sound high, senior study author Eric Matteson, MD, chair of the rheumatology department at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., says it’s significant. “It’s a big deal when you think there’s 1.5 million patients with RA, and how frequent kidney disease is becoming in the population.” This study looked at the health records of 1,623 people – 813 people who were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis between 1980 and 2007 and 813 people without RA who were similar in terms of age, gender, weight and other factors. Among those who had normal kidney function when they entered the study, 25 percent of those with RA and 20 percent of those without RA developed mildly or moderately reduced kidney function over 20 years. There was no difference in the rate of severe kidney dysfunction. RA patients who had high levels of inflammation in the first year after RA diagnosis (as measured by the blood test known as erythrocyte sedimentation rate, or “sed rate”) were more likely than others to develop reduced kidney function. “The general conclusion from that is that inflammation is a risk factor for renal dysfunction,” says Dr. Matteson. Comment: The risk is not impressive at first glance but it is significant. http://youtu.be/7EN3Uw-SAXA
Views: 1044 Nathan Wei
Rheumatoid Arthritis | 10 Tips for Living Well with RA | Third Age
 
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A diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis does not mean you can't live a healthy and normal life. These 10 tips for living well will help you cope with the disease while thriving in your daily activities. 1. Take Charge: Keep an open dialogue with your doctor and family or friends who are helping you to ensure that your needs are heard. 2. Take Care of Yourself: Get plenty of rest and keep a healthy diet. The Omega 3 fatty acids found in fish are great for RA patients. Check with your doctor before beginning an Omega 3 regimen. 3. Get Exercise: Exercising regularly can help to reduce the pain and swelling associated with RA. Start gradually by stretching, then eventually add strength training and aerobic exercise. Avoid high-intensity exercises such as running or downhill skiing. Always talk to your doctor about starting a new exercise regimen. 4. Monitor the Temperature: Cold, damp weather amplifies symptoms in many RA patients. It's important to adjust your thermostat to a comfortable, warmer temperature when the weather outside is cool. On very hot days, be sure to drink plenty of cold water and non-caffeinated beverages before you get thirsty. 5. Quit Smoking: Smoking greatly increases the inflammatory process in the body. As RA causes inflammation in many parts of the body, you do not want to intensify symptoms of swelling with smoking. The #1 cause of premature death for those with RA is heart attacks, which are more likely to occur in smokers. 6. Seek the Sun: Try to get 5-10 minutes of sunlight at least 3 times a week. Vitamin D from sunlight can fight against pain, swelling, and flu-like symptoms of RA. 7. Relax: Take a break when you begin to feel stressed, as stress can aggravate your RA. A glass of water, short walk to stretch your legs, breathing techniques, and practicing Tai Chi can be helpful in stressful situations. 8. Sit Up Straight: Posture training, such as the Alexander Technique, can greatly reduce strain on your joints and muscles to help avoid injury from excessive slouching. 9. Soothe Your Pain with Cold or Heat: Ice packs and heating pads on achy joints and muscles can help alleviate symptoms of pain. 10. Make Sure Your Immunizations are Up to Date: RA patients need to have all of their vaccines, especially flu shots, to avoid illness. The nature of RA and medications such as DMARDs reduce immunity, leaving patients with a higher susceptibility to infections. 11. Do What You Can: Lastly, do what you can. While RA may deter you from traveling over an extended period of time, try to get out as much as possible and enjoy what life has to offer in close proximity to you. Following these tips will help you to lead a happy and healthier life with RA. For information on how to live a healthy life with RA, click the link above.
Views: 1300 Third Age
Rachel's story, part 1: Living with rheumatoid arthritis
 
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Rachel Janzen describes living with the pain of rheumatoid arthritis, and the challenge of finding a treatment that will help manage her pain without serious side effects. See also: "Rachel's story, part 2: Why I'm taking medical cannabis" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BBVqEba8Mho
Views: 23597 Arthritis Society
Rheumatoid Arthritis | steroids being used more in ra
 
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http://www.arthritistreatmentcenter.com So… are steroids being used more or less in rheumatoid arthritis nowadays… Steroid Use in RA More Common Nancy Walsh writing in Medpage Today reported that more patients with rheumatoid arthritis today are initiating treatment with glucocorticoids (GCs) early in the course of disease than was the case 20 years ago, a retrospective study found. During the first year of disease, 68% of patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis between 1995 and 2007 started GCs compared with 36% of those diagnosed between 1980 and 1994 (P less then 0.001), according to Ashima Makol, MD, and colleagues from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. However, the doses have remained similar, with mean starting doses of 8.7 mg/day and 10.3 mg/day in the later and earlier cohorts, respectively. These findings may reflect shifting patterns of rheumatoid arthritis treatment, away from a "step-up" approach toward an early, aggressive, treat-to-target approach. Comment: Personally, I think low dose prednisone is a good bridge to use. http://youtu.be/IycTP7F1xYI
Views: 916 Nathan Wei
New research into rheumatoid arthritis
 
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European scientists have begun to screen people at risk of crippling rheumatoid arthritis in a study which aims stop the disease before it destroys lives. It's a disease which disables millions of people worldwide, half of those afflicted are left unable to work costing millions of dollars in treatment and welfare according to the World Health Organisation. This tissue sample comes from a young woman who is already experiencing the earliest symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). If we have the disease our joints become inflamed, swollen and painful because something triggers our own immune system to attack them. Doctors here want to know why our immune system behaves in this way and whether it is possible to make changes in earliest stages of the disease which will stop it before it can do any damage. This represents a sea change in the way doctors deal with the disease, the staff here want patients to come and be tested before the disease takes hold. The message now is not to wait until it become painful. The doctors are part of a European consortium called Euroteam, funded by the EU to find a way to prevent RA. Much of the work is done here in Britain's Institute of Translational Medicine at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham. Many patients with RA are forced to undergo multiple operations to remove and replace joints so damaged and painful, they cannot function. Here the rheumatologist is removing tiny amounts of synovial tissue which surrounds joints. Cells in this tissue secrete a liquid called synovial fluid which nourishes and lubricates the joints, early stage changes in this tissue fluid may be key to revealing what triggers the immune response into a 'seek and destroy' mode. Because RA is often confused with osteoarthritis, people tend to underestimate how debilitating disease it is. Until recently is was considered to be a disease of old age and even patients themselves did not report symptoms to doctors until they were well established. When 62 year old Sue Arnott was first diagnosed with RA she was given aspirin, it was exactly what had been given to her grandfather fifty years before. At the time there was no substantial drug development, by the time the new biological treatments came onto the market the damage to her body had already been done. Having the disease at an early age, she was forced to bury many of her dreams. Arnott first experienced RA when she was just 22 years old. It was the start of a long and painful journey. Since then Arnott's had four knee replacements, numerous operations on her wrist, and feet and she is waiting for her second hip replacement. She says: "It was just one night. I went to bed perfectly all right, woke up in the night crying because it hurt so much in my wrists." That night was a painful landmark. The disease worsened with the birth of her second child and she spent longer spells in hospital. Arnott is dismayed by the impact her disease has had on her family, particularly her son. She says: "I spent a month in hospital having a knee replacement and that was pretty strange for a child just starting nursery school. Mummy's not at home and actually the effect on him was his teachers though he might be deaf, but he wasn't. He was just living in a little world all by himself." Because a family member is four times more likely to develop RA Arnott's children also grew up with the fear that they might also be affected. The Arnott's believe research into the disease is vital, because people aren't aware of how the disease can wreak people's lives. Biological drugs to fight RA work by binding to messenger proteins blocking their ability to trigger the immune system. This is why doctors here want to target young patients You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/35ac068b0e0899f14834a9feb4d49548 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 1473 AP Archive