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"Management of Diabetic Ketoacidosis" by Michael Agus, MD for OPENPediatrics
 
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Please visit: www.openpediatrics.org OPENPediatrics™ is an interactive digital learning platform for healthcare clinicians sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital and in collaboration with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. It is designed to promote the exchange of knowledge between healthcare providers around the world caring for critically ill children in all resource settings. The content includes internationally recognized experts teaching the full range of topics on the care of critically ill children. All content is peer-reviewed and open access-and thus at no expense to the user. For further information on how to enroll, please email: openpediatrics@childrens.harvard.edu Please note: OPENPediatrics does not support nor control any related videos in the sidebar, these are placed by Youtube. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause. My name is Michael Agus, I'm a pediatric intensive care doctor and a pediatric endocrinologist at Boston Children's Hospital. I'm the Director of the Medicine Critical Care Program here Children's and an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School. Hyperglycemia. Why does one get hyperglycemic in DKA? Why does the blood sugar go up at all? Well it's really the same reason you get hyper- anything-emic in any clinical situation. It's some mismatch of increased-ins and decreased-outs. So what are the increased-ins of glucose into the blood stream? Well one major one is the one that patients are doing at home. What are they drinking at home? In general they're drinking Pedialyte or juice or some dextrose containing fluid and they don't realize that they are driving their blood sugar higher and higher. The other actor that's adding glucose to the bloodstream is the liver. The liver believes the blood sugar is extremely low because it can't get any glucose interstitially because of the insulin deficiency and so it turns on gluconeogenesis at full throttle. And of course that's also what produces the ketoacidosis: the lipolysis freeing up those circulating keytones and free fatty acids as well. Now where should the glucose be going? Well if insulin were present there would be normal cellular uptake. But with a decrease insulin production increased insulin resistance there is a functional severe insulin deficiency and so there is dramatically decreased cellular uptake. Now these three factors will give you blood sugars in the mid to high 100s. What really pushes you over the edge is when you begin to decrease perfusion to the kidneys. We know that the renal threshold ia about 180, and if your blood sugar is anything over 180 and you are adequately hydrated eventually the kidney will dump all that glucose. It may get dehydrated in the process and you'll need to replete those fluids. But the glucose should come down. In the setting where you begin to hypoperfuse the kidneys, that's when the glucose really shoots up, and that's when the glucose will hit 800, 1,000, 1,200 milligram per deciliter range. One important caveat to the construct I've mentioned here is the middle aged or adolescent patient who happens to be at home rehydrating with water. That's the one patient where the glucose may not be as elevated, the glucose may be only in the 400 range, 500. They may have quite significant diabetic ketoacidosis, however, they are not as dehydrated and the usual patient with DKA. These are rare patient but it's a patient where you really want to think twice when the blood sugar is not that high to ask yourself the question, maybe the kidneys are a little bit better perfused than I'm used to and maybe they don't need the amount of fluid that I'm about to to give. But for most patients they come to the emergency department, they have a blood sugar in say the 1,000 range and they will get their normal saline bolus, usually ten milliliters per kilogram over the first hour. And that will almost invariably, significantly drop their blood sugar because we saw on the prior slide we're now re-perfusing the kidneys. The kidneys are now able to dump glucose. And as such, the glucose will begin to plummet. After a few hours the trajectory of that glucose concentration will change. And now you're looking at the effect of insulin. Insulin will significantly decreases the glucose concentration but it won't do so at the rate that reperfusion will. We know that if we don't do something about the glucose decrease as a insulin infuses, is it will go all the way down to zero. But we maintain a target range about 150 to 250 and in many hands, the appropriate range is really 200 to 300 milligrams per deciliter. And we achieve that range by adding dextrose to our IV fluids. Now one has to understand that the range here is chosen really to make sure that the glucose doesn't go severely low.
Views: 15287 OPENPediatrics
Virtual Learning Session: Glycemic Control in Critical Care
 
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The BC Patient Safety & Quality Council hosts a series of virtual learning sessions to support Clinical Care Management: The largest health quality improvement initiative ever undertaken in British Columbia. This session is presented by Dr. Peter Dodek who describes the rationale for controlling blood glucose levels in one of our most vulnerable patient populations. Dr. Juan Ronco gives an overview of quality improvement measurement for this topic. Don't forget to: -Subscribe to the BCPSQC YouTube channel -Sign up for our newsletter at http://eepurl.com/gYpyj -Learn more at www.BCPSQC.ca
Views: 608 BCPSQC
Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Explained Clearly - Diabetes Complications
 
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Understand Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) with this clear explanation from Dr. Seheult of http://www.medcram.com. This is video 1 of 2 on diabetic ketoacidosis (pathophysiology and signs of diabetic ketoacidosis / DKA): 0:08 DKA stats 0:47 DKA - cellular anatomy 1:00 mitochondria 1:48 beta-oxidation 2:30 insulin function 3:08 pyruvate 3:19 diabetes mellitus type 1 3:26 diabetes mellitus type 2 4:48 ketone bodies (acetone, acetoacetate, b-hydroxybutyrate) 6:09 carboxylic acid 6:23 conjugate base (anion gap acidosis) 7:38 beta-oxidation 8:17 DKA review 8:57 diabetic ketoacidosis - hyperkalemia 9:37 diabetic ketoacidosis - dehydration 9:50 osmotic diuresis 10:10 dehydration 10:27 diabetic ketoacidosis - potassium effects 11:04 diabetic ketoacidosis - Cr elevation / renal failure 11:30 anion gap metabolic acidosis 12:09 measuring ketone bodies (serum ketones, b-hydroxybutyrate) Speaker: Roger Seheult, MD Clinical and Exam Preparation Instructor Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine. MedCram: Medical topics explained clearly including: Asthma, COPD, Acute Renal Failure, Mechanical Ventilation, Oxygen Hemoglobin Dissociation Curve, Hypertension, Shock, Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), Medical Acid Base, VQ Mismatch, Hyponatremia, Liver Function Tests, Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs), Adrenal Gland, Pneumonia Treatment, any many others. New topics are often added weekly- please subscribe to help support MedCram and become notified when new videos have been uploaded. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=medcramvideos Recommended Audience: Health care professionals and medical students: including physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurses, respiratory therapists, EMT and paramedics, and many others. Review for USMLE, MCAT, PANCE, NCLEX, NAPLEX, NDBE, RN, RT, MD, DO, PA, NP school and board examinations. More from MedCram: Complete Video library: https://www.youtube.com/c/medcram Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedCram Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/1/+Medcram Twitter: https://twitter.com/MedCramVideos Produced by Kyle Allred PA-C Please note: MedCram medical videos, medical lectures, medical illustrations, and medical animations are for medical educational and exam preparation purposes, and not intended to replace recommendations by your health care provider.
Inpatient Glucose Management by Dr. Sathya Krishnasamy
 
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Dr. Krishnasamy presents Inpatient Glucose Management by first discussing a case of hospital hyperglycemia. She then reviews current guidelines for glycemic management trends in non-critical care settings. After, she reviews institutional protocols. Some items in this lecture may have come from the lecturer’s personal academic files or have been cited in-line or at the end of the lecture. For more information, see our citation page. Disclaimers ©2016 LouisvilleLectures.org Get CME Credit: https://cmetracker.net/ULOUCME/Login? formname=RegLoginLive&EventID=1275382 SUBSCRIBE to LOUISVILLE LECTURES: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbUJXnjWRGedNsMLqw-td9g?&ab_channel=UofLInternalMedicineLectureSeries VISIT OUR BLOG: http://www.louisvillelectures.org/ We can teach the world medicine. The Internal Medicine Lecture Series is a resident founded, resident run FOAMed (Free Open Access Medical Education) project by LouisvilleLectures.org, supported by the Internal Medicine Residency, Medicine Department and the University of Louisville. The content is free to all who wish to learn. For more information, visit our website below. Please view our full disclaimer on our website, as space limitations prohibit its posting here. All content is copyrighted by the University of Louisville.
Inpatient Diabetes Management
 
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A summary of the inpatient management of diabetes. Topics include the sliding scale, basal bolus regimens, adjusting insulin when NPO, adjusting insulin for persistent hyperglycemia, and the consistent carb diet. Information here is provided for educational purposes only, and is not intended to substitute for the opinion of an experienced and licensed health care professional. This work is made available under the terms of the Creative Commons, Attribution-NonCommerical-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. It may be reproduced and distributed provided that accurate attribution remains, the work is not altered in any way, and it is not used for commercial purposes. For details, please refer to: creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en_US.
Views: 45267 Strong Medicine
SESSIONS FOR NURSES 5 - DIABETES MELLITUS
 
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Diabetes Mellitus 1) Identifying Types 1and 2 2) Insulin, its discoveries and how it controls blood glucose 3) Insulin administration, per MD orders 4) Hypoglycemia-low blood sugar following Regular Insulin and how to prevent it. -Hyperglycmia - DKA (Diabetic Ketoacidosis) - Sliding Scale Insulin
Views: 16466 dearnurses
Hyperglycemia in the intensive care unit
 
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Hyperglycemia and insulin resistance are common in critically ill patients even if they did not have diabetes before their illnesses. Read more at: https://medicineport.com/hyperglycemia-in-the-intensive-care-unit/
Views: 38 Medicine Port
NCLEX Diabetes Mellitus Practice Question on Insulin | Pharmacology Review
 
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NCLEX pharmacology practice question on Insulin for the patient with diabetes mellitus. This NCLEX-style question will test your knowledge about Insulin Lispro (Humalog) and wants to know when the patient is at most risk for hypoglycemia based on the time you administered the medication. On the NCLEX exam, it is inevitable you will receive pharmacology type questions. This particular NCLEX practice question will require you to determine what type of insulin Lispro is (rapid, short, intermediate, or long-acting) and when a patient is at most risk for hypoglycemia (onset, peak, duration). This video is part of a weekly NCLEX review series where I will be going over NCLEX-style questions with you. I will be helping you analyze and breakdown each question, and walk you through how to select the correct option. NCLEX questions require critical thinking and you must know how to use your nursing knowledge to gather the facts and analyze what the question is asking. NCLEX Pharmacology Practice Question on Insulin: Your patient's blood glucose level is 215 mg/dL. The patient is about to eat lunch. Per sliding scale, you administer 4 units of Insulin Lispro (Humalog) subcutaneously at 1130. As the nurse, you know the patient is most at risk for hypoglycemia at what time? A. 1145 B. 1230 C. 1430 D. 1630 Watch the video for the correct answer and rationale. Free NCLEX practice quizzes: http://www.registerednursern.com/nursing-student-quizzes-tests/ Notes: http://www.registerednursern.com/nclex-practice-question-on-insulin/ More NCLEX Weekly Questions: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfW4sKVpfklFFvhvBNjQazHb #NCLEX #Nursingschool #Nurse #NCLEXPrep #NCLEXreview Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=registerednursern Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-ultimate-list-of-nursing-medical-supplies-and-items-a-new-nurse-student-nurse-needs-to-buy/ Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/RegisteredNurseRN/videos All of our videos in a playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAhHxt663pU&list=PLQrdx7rRsKfXMveRcN4df0bad3ugEaQnk Popular Playlists: NCLEX Reviews: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWtwCDmLHyX2UeHofCIcgo0 Fluid & Electrolytes: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWJSZ9pL8L3Q1dzdlxUzeKv Nursing Skills: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUhd_qQYEbp0Eab3uUKhgKb Nursing School Study Tips: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWBO40qeDmmaMwMHJEWc9Ms Nursing School Tips & Questions" https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVQok-t1X5ZMGgQr3IMBY9M Teaching Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUkW_DpJekN_Y0lFkVNFyVF Types of Nursing Specialties: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfW8dRD72gUFa5W7XdfoxArp Healthcare Salary Information: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVN0vmEP59Tx2bIaB_3Qhdh New Nurse Tips: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVTqH6LIoAD2zROuzX9GXZy Nursing Career Help: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVXjptWyvj2sx1k1587B_pj EKG Teaching Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfU-A9UTclI0tOYrNJ1N5SNt Personality Types: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfU0qHnOjj2jf4Hw8aJaxbtm Dosage & Calculations for Nurses: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUYdl0TZQ0Tc2-hLlXlHNXq Diabetes Health Managment: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfXtEx17D7zC1efmWIX-iIs9
Views: 51123 RegisteredNurseRN
Diabetes Pathophysiology
 
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Insulin is the principal hormone that regulates the uptake of glucose from the blood into most cells of the body, especially liver, muscle, and adipose tissue. Therefore, deficiency of insulin or the insensitivity of its receptors plays a central role in all forms of diabetes mellitus. The body obtains glucose from three main places: the intestinal absorption of food, the breakdown of glycogen, the storage form of glucose found in the liver, and gluconeogenesis, the generation of glucose from non-carbohydrate substrates in the body. Insulin plays a critical role in balancing glucose levels in the body. Insulin can inhibit the breakdown of glycogen or the process of gluconeogenesis, it can stimulate the transport of glucose into fat and muscle cells, and it can stimulate the storage of glucose in the form of glycogen. Insulin is released into the blood by beta cells (β-cells), found in the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas, in response to rising levels of blood glucose, typically after eating. Insulin is used by about two-thirds of the body's cells to absorb glucose from the blood for use as fuel, for conversion to other needed molecules, or for storage. Lower glucose levels result in decreased insulin release from the beta cells and in the breakdown of glycogen to glucose. This process is mainly controlled by the hormone glucagon, which acts in the opposite manner to insulin. If the amount of insulin available is insufficient, if cells respond poorly to the effects of insulin (insulin insensitivity or insulin resistance), or if the insulin itself is defective, then glucose will not be absorbed properly by the body cells that require it, and it will not be stored appropriately in the liver and muscles. The net effect is persistently high levels of blood glucose, poor protein synthesis, and other metabolic derangements, such as acidosis. When the glucose concentration in the blood remains high over time, the kidneys will reach a threshold of reabsorption, and glucose will be excreted in the urine (glycosuria).This increases the osmotic pressure of the urine and inhibits reabsorption of water by the kidney, resulting in increased urine production (polyuria) and increased fluid loss. Lost blood volume will be replaced osmotically from water held in body cells and other body compartments, causing dehydration and increased thirst (polydipsia). (source:- wikipedia)
Views: 21863 DoctorDC online
Arterial Lines Simplified (MAP)
 
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Greetings my fellow Nurses, today Im going to discuss Arterial lines with their Pressure Transducer and reasons for Art Line use in critical care. So arterial catheter connected to a pressure transducer are used for real time blood pressure (systolic, diastolic, mean and pulse pressure. The reason patients need this are for specific conditions like * Labile blood pressure * Anticipation of haemodynamic instability * Titration of vasoactive drugs * Frequent blood sampling * Morbid obesity (unable to fit an appropriately sized NIBP cuff) Don't forget that the Arterial line other than blood pressure can be used for * pulse rate and rhythm * effects of dysrhythmia on perfusion * ECG lead disconnection * continuous cardiac output using pulse contour analysis * specific wave form morphologies might be diagnostic * tamponade & also for pulse pressure variation (suggests fluid responsiveness) COMPLICATIONS to assess my fellow nurse brothers and sisters are the 5 P’s -Pulselessness -Pallor -Pain -Paresthesia -Paralysis ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Don't Forget to Follow NurseMendoza & P.L.A.N ✌🏽️Peace ❤️Love 🗣Advocate 😷NURSEpiration ------- Thank you for watching this video my fellow nurses, student nurses and aspiring nurses. I hope that you keep up with the daily videos I post on the channel, subscribe, and share your learnings with those that need to hear it. Your comments are my oxygen, so please take a second and say ‘Hey’ 😉. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe to my VIP Newsletter for exclusive content and weekly giveaways here at https://www.Cardiacstrong.care ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 📱Facebook:https://m.facebook.com/NURSEpiration/ 📸Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nursemendoza/?hl=en 📽Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/NurseMendoza 🐤Twitter: https://twitter.com/youtubeNurse?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor 👻Snapchat: https://www.snapchat.com/add/nursemendoza1 📸IG:CardiacStrong: http://instagram.com/cardiacstrong 📸IG:NURSEpiration: http://instagram.com/nursepiration ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- #Nursemendoza #Proverbs30 #NURSEpiration #CardiacStrong #Pulmonary #CardiacStrong #Nursing #School #Visionary #NurseGrind #CCRN #StimulateYourBrain #medsurg #tattednurse #Books #patho #nursingbooks #careplans #cna #lvp #Nursemendoza #NURSEpiration #Pulmonary #CardiacStrong #Nursing #School #Visionary #rn #NurseGrinding #NurseHustle #NurseGang #nurseonduty #scrubsmag #nurse #nurselife #Medical #LaRaza #Anatomy #Nursing #nurse #Proverbs30 #CVICU #ICU #ER #PACU #TELE #surgery #Ob&Gyn #Nursing #Newborn #Infant #RN #ObgynNursing #Medical #NewLife #L&D #obstetrics #gynecology #NursingStudent #StudentNurse #NURSEpiration #Nursing #RN #Medical #N #StudentNurse #emergency #NURSEspiration #NurseGrinding #vision #Plan ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Disclaimer: No content contained herein is meant to be representative of our or any other institution. The opinions expressed in this video on this channel are not necessarily of those hospitals where I work, or their affiliated institutions. The views expressed on this channel and/or in the videos on this channel do not represent medical advice- if you have specific medical concerns please contact your doctor. In order to protect patient privacy all patient identifiers in all videos have been deleted or altered. The views expressed on this channel and/or on the videos on this channel are opinions.
Views: 82984 NurseMendoza
Acute complications of diabetes - Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic state | Khan Academy
 
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Visit us (http://www.khanacademy.org/science/healthcare-and-medicine) for health and medicine content or (http://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat) for MCAT related content. These videos do not provide medical advice and are for informational purposes only. The videos are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read or seen in any Khan Academy video. Created by Matthew McPheeters. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-endocrine-system-diseases/rn-diabetes/v/diabetic-nephropathy-mechanisms?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-endocrine-system-diseases/rn-diabetes/v/acute-complications-of-diabetes-diabetic-ketoacidosis?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 108418 khanacademymedicine
Diabetes Mellitus: Dietary Management – Nurse – Case Manager – CEUs – CRC  – CDM S☑️
 
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This is a preview of the CareerSmart Learning online continuing education course Diabetes Mellitus: Dietary Management. This course can be purchased at https://careersmart.com/shop/diabetes-mellitus-pt-3-dietary-management-nurses-ccm-crc-cdms-2-5-ceus/. This advanced course on diabetes diet management can be taken as Part 3 of a series or on its own. Course objectives are: describe how the intake of dietary carbohydrates can have a direct influence on an individual’s blood glucose levels; differentiate between the various diet therapies used in management of type I, type II, and gestational diabetes; describe how to modify nutrient intake of carbohydrates, proteins, fats, and fibers to prevent and treat common complications of diabetes; and identify how diabetic complications can arise due to the lack of dietary management. Approved for 2.5 continuing education units-CEUs-contact hours for the following professions: • Nurses (RN, LVN, LPN) (all states) • Critical Care RN (CCRN): meets the criteria for CCRN Synergy Continuing Education Recognition Point(s) (CERPS) in Category A • Certified Case Managers (CCM) • Certified Rehab Counselors (CRC) • Certified Disability Management Specialists (CDMS) To shop all of our online courses & course bundles go to http://careersmart.com. We provide online & live continuing education to nurses, case managers, CDMS, rehab counselors, OSHA, workers' comp, & RCFE admins.
Glycemic Control in Critical Care
 
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What are appropriate glycemic targets for hospitalized patients, and how can clinicians help patients reach those goals? Dr. Mary T. Korytkowski discusses.
Views: 497 ClinicalEndoNews
Insulin Onset Peak Duration Mnemonic | Types of Insulin Nursing NCLEX Review
 
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Insulin mnemonic on how to remember insulin onset, peak, duration times of rapid acting insulin, short acting insulin, intermediate acting, and long acting insulin. Insulin mechanism of action depends on what type of insulin the nurse is injecting into the patient and how that particular insulin peaks in the system (along with the insulin medication's onset and duration). During insulin peak times, the patient is at most risk for hypoglycemia. Quiz on Insulin Types & Onset, Peak, Duration: http://www.registerednursern.com/diabetes-mellitus-pharmacology-nursing-management-nclex-quiz/ How to Mix Insulin: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAhHxt663pU Lecture Notes for this video: http://www.registerednursern.com/insulin-mnemonic/ Watch Diabetes NCLEX Review Series: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWY__T0MLUDUSAznmgWURT0 Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=registerednursern Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-ultimate-list-of-nursing-medical-supplies-and-items-a-new-nurse-student-nurse-needs-to-buy/ Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nursing-career-help/ Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/RegisteredNurseRN/videos Popular Playlists: "NCLEX Study Strategies": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWtwCDmLHyX2UeHofCIcgo0 "Fluid & Electrolytes Made So Easy": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWJSZ9pL8L3Q1dzdlxUzeKv "Nursing Skills Videos": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUhd_qQYEbp0Eab3uUKhgKb "Nursing School Study Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWBO40qeDmmaMwMHJEWc9Ms "Nursing School Tips & Questions": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVQok-t1X5ZMGgQr3IMBY9M "Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUkW_DpJekN_Y0lFkVNFyVF "Types of Nursing Specialties": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfW8dRD72gUFa5W7XdfoxArp "Healthcare Salary Information": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVN0vmEP59Tx2bIaB_3Qhdh "New Nurse Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVTqH6LIoAD2zROuzX9GXZy "Nursing Career Help": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVXjptWyvj2sx1k1587B_pj "EKG Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfU-A9UTclI0tOYrNJ1N5SNt "Personality Types": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfU0qHnOjj2jf4Hw8aJaxbtm "Dosage & Calculations for Nurses": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUYdl0TZQ0Tc2-hLlXlHNXq "Diabetes Health Managment": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfXtEx17D7zC1efmWIX-iIs9
Views: 225884 RegisteredNurseRN
Hypoglycemia Symptoms - Warning Signs of Diabetes
 
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http://www.nutritionforest.com/blood-sugar-support.html http://www.nutritionforest.com Nutrition Forest Blood Sugar Support Made with an superb blend of herbs and nutrients, Blood Sugar Support is formulated to help the body maintain healthy blood sugar levels that are in the normal range. The key herbs include Cinnamon, Gymnema Sylvestre, Banaba, Bitter Melon, and Guggul. Also added are effective amounts of Chromium Picolinate, Vitamin C and Vitamin E. The recommended dose is one capsule three times daily with meals. While eating a sugary snack, fruit, and carbohydrates, it breaks down into glucose (blood sugar) that is important for energy in your cells. In order to get into that glucose into your cells, your body produces insulin that acts like the key unlocking the door. Excess glucose can lead to diabetes but excess insulin or insulin resistance is a problem too. Unfortunately, most people’s blood sugar is not properly balanced. If you’re getting too much glucose, it leads to high blood-sugar levels, which your body can’t break down and stores as fat. Ironically, not getting enough sugar can also lead to putting on extra pounds! Eating too little glucose can lead to a low blood sugar level, causing your body to go into “starvation mode” where it burns your lean muscle instead of the fat – a double whammy to your system and your diet. Maintaining healthy blood sugar levels in the normal range is not only critical for energy and mood, but also for cardiovascular, nervous system, and immune health . Since the typical diet is high in refined carbohydrates and sugars, it’s no wonder that such a high proportion of our population has blood sugar concerns. Hectic lifestyles, chronic stress , and genetic predispositions can also easily upset the delicate balance of physiological events that influence glucose and insulin levels. It is very important that blood sugar levels are kept as close to normal as possible. For most people with diabetes, a healthy range is between 90 and 130 mg/dl before meals and less than 180 mg/dl at one to two hours after a meal (see chart below). A doctor or health care provider can tell a person with diabetes about how and when to test blood sugar. It is helpful to keep a record of blood sugar readings several times during the day. diabetes type 2 diabetes diabetes symptoms symptoms of diabetes type 1 diabetes hypoglycemia glucose prediabetes diabetes mellitus low blood sugar blood sugar levels normal blood sugar low blood sugar symptoms hypoglycemia symptoms normal blood sugar level high blood sugar symptoms of low blood sugar glucose levels symptoms of high blood sugar blood glucose levels normal glucose levels high blood sugar symptoms glucose test glucometer how to lower blood sugar blood sugar chart juvenile diabetes symptoms of hypoglycemia fasting blood sugar blood sugar range what is normal blood sugar normal blood glucose levels diabetes test normal sugar level signs of low blood sugar normal blood sugar range blood sugar test what is hypoglycemia glucose meter high glucose levels blood sugar levels chart signs of high blood sugar causes of diabetes signs of hypoglycemia diabetes treatment normal fasting blood sugar continuous glucose monitoring blood glucose meters blood glucose sugar level lower blood sugar foods that lower blood sugar blood sugar monitor glucose level chart high glucose low blood sugar levels glucose monitor
Views: 1025 Adrien Abernathy
Cirrhosis of the Liver Nursing Care Management Symptoms NCLEX
 
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Cirrhosis of the liver nursing NCLEX review over the symptoms, nursing care/management, pathophysiology, complications, and treatments. Cirrhosis is a liver disease where liver cells become extremely damaged due to long-term/severe damage. This damage can be from a viral infection (Hepatitis B or C), heavy alcohol consumption, obesity, hyperlipidemia, bile duct problem, autoimmune etc. These damaged liver cells are replaced with fibrous tissue, and this leads to scarring of the liver. The role of the liver is to filter the blood and perform the following functions to it: metabolizing, detoxifying, storing, producing etc. When liver cells are damaged these processes do not happen. Complications of cirrhosis include: portal hypertension, splenomegaly, ascites, jaundice, hepatic encephalopathy, esophageal varices etc. All of these conditions are discussed in depth in the video. During the early stages of cirrhosis the patient may be asymptomatic, however, in the late stages the patient will have signs and symptoms that include: asterixis, fetor hepaticus, jaundice, reduced platelets and white blood cells, spider angiomas, ascites, gynecomastia, increase ammonia level etc. Nursing interventions for cirrhosis include monitoring for bleeding, abnormal glucose levels, implementing a proper diet: if patient has confusion (hepatic encephalopathy) they need a low protein diet, however, if patient isn't confused they need a high lean protein diet, low sodium, fluid restriction, assessing for rupture of varices, administering lactulose etc. Treatment for cirrhosis includes a liver transplant and medications such as diuretics, blood products, vitamin K, beta blocker or nitrates. In addition to a paracentesis. which helps remove fluid from the abdomen, if ascites is present. Quiz on Cirrhosis: http://www.registerednursern.com/cirrhosis-nclex-questions/ Notes: http://www.registerednursern.com/cirrhosis-nclex-review/ More GI reviews: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVVQ5TeRY7Vy1Tq3pcGTDFO Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/registerednursern_com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RegisteredNurseRNs Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=registerednursern Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-ultimate-list-of-nursing-medical-supplies-and-items-a-new-nurse-student-nurse-needs-to-buy/ Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/RegisteredNurseRN/videos All of our videos in a playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAhHxt663pU&list=PLQrdx7rRsKfXMveRcN4df0bad3ugEaQnk Popular Playlists: NCLEX Reviews: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWtwCDmLHyX2UeHofCIcgo0 Fluid & Electrolytes: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWJSZ9pL8L3Q1dzdlxUzeKv Nursing Skills: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUhd_qQYEbp0Eab3uUKhgKb Nursing School Study Tips: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWBO40qeDmmaMwMHJEWc9Ms Nursing School Tips & Questions" https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVQok-t1X5ZMGgQr3IMBY9M Teaching Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUkW_DpJekN_Y0lFkVNFyVF Types of Nursing Specialties: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfW8dRD72gUFa5W7XdfoxArp Healthcare Salary Information: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVN0vmEP59Tx2bIaB_3Qhdh New Nurse Tips: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVTqH6LIoAD2zROuzX9GXZy Nursing Career Help: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVXjptWyvj2sx1k1587B_pj EKG Teaching Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfU-A9UTclI0tOYrNJ1N5SNt Dosage & Calculations for Nurses: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUYdl0TZQ0Tc2-hLlXlHNXq Diabetes Health Managment: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfXtEx17D7zC1efmWIX-iIs9
Views: 129212 RegisteredNurseRN
Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Pathophysiology, Animation
 
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Diabetic ketoacidosis (one of the hyperglycemic crises), DKA, pathophysiology, causes, clinical presentation (signs and symptoms) and treatment. This video and similar images/videos are available for instant download licensing here https://www.alilamedicalmedia.com/-/galleries/images-videos-by-medical-specialties/endocrinology Voice by: Penelope Hammet ©Alila Medical Media. All rights reserved. All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Support us on Patreon and get FREE downloads and other great rewards: patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMedia Diabetic ketoacidosis, DKA, is an ACUTE and potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. DKA is commonly associated with type 1 but type 2 diabetics are also susceptible. DKA is caused by a critically LOW INSULIN level and is usually triggered when diabetic patients undergo further STRESS, such as infections, inadequate insulin administration, or cardiovascular diseases. It may also occur as the FIRST presentation of diabetes in people who did NOT know they had diabetes and therefore did NOT have insulin treatment. Glucose is the MAJOR energy source of the body. It comes from digestion of carbohydrates and is carried by the bloodstream to various organs. Insulin is a hormone produced by beta-cells of the pancreas and is responsible for DRIVING glucose INTO cells. When insulin is DEFICIENT, glucose can NOT enter the cells; it stays in the blood, causing HIGH blood sugar levels while the cells are STARVED. In response to this metabolic starvation, the body INcreases the levels of counter-regulatory hormones. These hormones have 2 major effects that are responsible for clinical presentation of DKA: - First, they produce MORE glucose in an attempt to supply energy to the cells. This is done by breaking down glycogen into glucose, and synthesizing glucose from NON-carbohydrate substrates such as proteins and lipids. However, as the cells CANNOT use glucose, this response ONLY results in MORE sugar in the blood. As blood sugar level EXCEEDS the ability of the kidneys to reabsorb, it overflows into urine, taking water and electrolytes along with it in a process known as OSMOTIC DIURESIS. This results in large volumes of urine, dehydration and excessive thirst. - Second, they activate lipolysis and fatty acid metabolism for ALTERNATIVE fuel. In the liver, metabolism of fatty acids as an alternative energy source produces KETONE bodies. One of these is acetone, a volatile substance that gives DKA patient’s breath a characteristic SWEET smell. Ketone bodies, unlike fatty acids, can cross the blood-brain barrier and therefore can serve as fuel for the brain during glucose starvation. They are, however, ACIDIC, and when produced in LARGE amounts, overwhelm the buffering capacity of blood plasma, resulting in metabolic ACIDOSIS. As the body tries to reduce blood acidity by EXHALING MORE carbon dioxide, a deep and labored breathing, known as Kussmaul breathing may result. Another compensation mechanism for high acidity MOVES hydrogen ions INTO cells in exchange for potassium. This leads to INcreased potassium levels in the blood; but as potassium is constantly excreted in urine during osmotic diuresis, the overall potassium level in the body is eventually depleted. A blood test MAY indicate too much potassium, or hyperkalemia, but once INSULIN treatment starts, potassium moves BACK into cells and hypokalemia may result instead. For this reason, blood potassium level is monitored throughout treatment and potassium replacement is usually required together with intravenous fluid and insulin as primary treatment for DKA.
Views: 14805 Alila Medical Media
Inpatient Management of the Patient with Type 2 Diabetes
 
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Using a case-based lesson, the webcast examines target glucose levels and glucose-lowering strategies for hospitalized patients. Inpatient Management of the Patient with Type 2 Diabetes features expert faculty member, Cecilia Lansang, MD, of the Cleveland Clinic, with commentary by Activity Director, Charles Faiman, MD. The video was produced by the Cleveland Clinic Foundation Center for Continuing Education and the Endocrine, Diabetes & Metabolism Institute. Interested in related CME education? Visit http://www.clevelandclinicmeded.com/medicalpubs/diseasemanagement/endocrinology/
Views: 1964 ClevelandClinicCME
Inpatient glucose  management & ICU Setting
 
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Inpatient glucose management & ICU Setting
Views: 69 Trendo 2015
Preventing Infections When Monitoring Blood Glucose
 
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FDA and CDC are alerting healthcare professionals about the risks of transmitting hepatitis B virus (HBV) and other infectious diseases when monitoring blood glucose. In recent years, the FDA and CDC have seen an increase in reported HBV outbreaks associated with monitoring blood glucose. That is especially the case in long-term care settings, such as nursing homes and assisted living facilities, where residents often need someone to help monitor their blood glucose levels. But this risk exists in any setting where blood glucose monitoring equipment is shared, or where those performing the monitoring do not follow basic infection control practices. This includes acute care facilities, as well as clinics, health fairs, shelters, detention facilities, senior centers, schools, and camps. Reusable fingerstick lancing devices should never be used for more than one person to avoid the risk of transmitting bloodborne pathogens. But the glucose meters themselves can also pose an infection risk because it is hard to ensure that blood has been completely removed from these devices. For example, a multicenter survey published in 2005 showed that 30 percent of blood glucose meters used routinely in the surveyed hospitals had detectable blood on their surfaces. So FDA and CDC recommend that whenever possible, blood glucose meters should be used for one patient only. If that is not possible, clean and disinfect the meters after every use according to the meter's labeling to prevent carry-over of blood and infectious agents. Even when following these precautions, be sure to wash hands and change gloves between patients. It is also important to remember that these recommendations apply to other point-of-care testing devices, such as PT/INR anticoagulation meters and cholesterol testing devices. FDA Patient Safety News: December 2010 For more information, please see our website: http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/psn/transcript.cfm?show=105#1 [vpmedicaldevices]
Views: 4303 USFoodandDrugAdmin
Intensive Glucose Control
 
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Dr. Richard M. Bergenstal discusses the take-away lessons from the three major trials of intensive glucose control -- ACCORD, ADVANCE and VADT and how clinicians can incorporate them into practice. GMNN's Sherry Boschert reports.
Views: 254 ClinicalEndoNews
Diabetes Management
 
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Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce a sufficient amount of insulin, or when the body cannot effectively utilize the insulin it produces resulting in either high blood sugar or low blood sugar. To increase the conformity of the Hypoglycemia Protocol, numerous strategies were utilized to educate and assess the knowledge of the Huron Hospital nurses about Hypoglycemia. Results show that with instruction from a Diabetes Specialty Nurse, the nurses' knowledge about diabetes and the Hypoglycemia Protocol compliance on the nursing units increased improving patient care.
Views: 2288 Cleveland Clinic
DKA - Diabetic Ketoacidosis Nursing Care NCLEX® Review | NRSNGacademy.com
 
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Free Lab Values Cheat Sheet at: http://www.NRSNG.com/labs Diabetic Ketoacidosis or DKA is a highly complex condition that can be life threatening. This video covers nursing care, pathophysiology, and management of the patient with DKA. For a detailed case study of how to care for a DKA patient visit: https://www.nrsng.com/nursing-clinical-judgement-care-plans This video covers the basic psychophysiology and nursing care for patients with DKA. Tired of professors who don't seem to care, confusing lectures, and taking endless NCLEX® review questions? . . . Welcome to NRSNG.com | Where Nurses Learn . . . Prepare to DEMOLISH the NCLEX. Blog: http://www.NRSNG.com Apps: http://www.RNcrush.com | http://www.Simclex.com Books: http://www.NursingStudentBooks.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NRSNG Visit us at http://www.nrsng.com/medical-information-disclaimer/ for disclaimer information. NCLEX®, NCLEX-RN® are registered trademarks of the National Council of State Boards of Nursing, INC. and hold no affiliation with NRSNG.
How is Diabetes Managed|diabetes|managing diabetes
 
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Before the discovery of insulin in 1921, everyone with type 1 diabetes died within a few years after diagnosis. Although insulin is not considered a cure, its discovery was the first major breakthrough in diabetes treatment. Today, healthy eating, physical activity, and taking insulin are the basic therapies for type 1 diabetes. The amount of insulin must be balanced with food intake and daily activities. Blood glucose levels must be closely monitored through frequent blood glucose checking. People with diabetes also monitor blood glucose levels several times a year with a laboratory test called the A1C. Results of the A1C test reflect average blood glucose over a 2 to 3 month period. Healthy eating, physical activity, and blood glucose testing are the basic management tools for type 2 diabetes. In addition, many people with type 2 diabetes require oral medication, insulin, or both to control their blood glucose levels. Adults with diabetes are at high risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). In fact, at least 65 percent of those with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke. Managing diabetes is more than keeping blood glucose levels under control it is also important to manage blood pressure and cholesterol levels through healthy eating, physical activity, and use of medications (if needed). By doing so, those with diabetes can lower their risk. Aspirin therapy, if recommended by the health care team, and smoking cessation can also help lower risk. People with diabetes must take responsibility for their day-to-day care. Much of the daily care involves keeping blood glucose levels from going too low or too high. When blood glucose levels drop too low a condition known as hypoglycemia a person can become nervous, shaky, and confused. Judgment can be impaired, and if blood glucose falls too low, fainting can occur. A person can also become ill if blood glucose levels rise too high, a condition known as hyperglycemia. People with diabetes should see a health care provider who will help them learn to manage their diabetes and who will monitor their diabetes control. Most people with diabetes get care from primary care physicians internists, family practice doctors, or pediatricians. Often, having a team of providers can improve diabetes care. A team can include: - a primary care provider such as an internist, a family practice doctor, or a pediatrician. - an endocrinologist (a specialist in diabetes care). - a dietitian, a nurse, and other health care providers who are certified diabetes educators, experts in providing information about managing diabetes. - a podiatrist (for foot care). - an ophthalmologist or an optometrist (for eye care). and other health care providers, such as cardiologists and other specialists. In addition, the team for a pregnant woman with type 1, type 2, or gestational diabetes should include an obstetrician who specializes in caring for women with diabetes. The team can also include a pediatrician or a neonatologist with experience taking care of babies born to women with diabetes. The goal of diabetes management is to keep levels of blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol as close to the normal range as safely possible. A major study, the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT), sponsored by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), showed that keeping blood glucose levels close to normal reduces the risk of developing major complications of type 1 diabetes. This 10-year study, completed in 1993, included 1,441 people with type 1 diabetes. The study compared the effect of two treatment approaches intensive management and standard management on the development and progression of eye, kidney, nerve, and cardiovascular complications of diabetes. Intensive treatment aimed to keep A1C levels as close to normal (6 percent) as possible. Researchers found that study participants who maintained lower levels of blood glucose through intensive management had significantly lower rates of these complications. More recently, a follow-up study of DCCT participants showed that the ability of intensive control to lower the complications of diabetes has persisted more than 10 years after the trial ended. This video is for information purposes only and is not meant to treat, diagnose or prevent any ailment or disease. See your physician for proper diagnosis and treatment. This presentation contains images that were used under a Creative Commons License. Click here to see the full list of images and attributions: https://app.contentsamurai.com/cc/123351 Visit Our Website at: http://typetwodiabetes.us This Video: https://youtu.be/Ka4ZPgd-yPc YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbTMJAjKpwY7RxmZJNdHEbg
Views: 2 TypeTwoDiabetes
How much do diabetic nurses make ? | Best Health Channel
 
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Glucose management by registered nurses for adult patients. What is the average annual salary for diabetes educator? How much does a educator make? The median as of september 27,, with range usually between however this can vary widely depending on variety factors anonymously by employees. Your level diabetes nurse salary asn or bsn. Certified diabetes educator (cde) salary. Ukall jobs body does not make enough insulin. Diabetes checks checkups for diabetes. The skills that increase pay for this job the most are spanish language, bilingual, and cde 11 2007 i don't like to ask about salary too much on here, but am really having trouble finding anything. What salary does a diabetes educator earn in your area? Diabetes salarieshow much make? Diabetic nurse manager can obtain professional certification and belong to an more than the median for registered nurse, reported as per year by u. Ukdiabetes care who does what? Netdoctor. Running the numbers, exploring ways to save, and making financing of definition target glucose levels should include accepted minimum need extend authority registered nurses (rns) make management related. Certified diabetes educator (cde) salary payscalern jobs, employment salaries by education, experience, location and the average of a certified self management best nursing careers specialties how do i become nurse consultant? . Ways to become a diabetes educator wikihow. Sending your kid to camp with diabetes self management. Much better to go for what is real each person, even if not ideal and have them succeed. A certified diabetes educator (cde) earns an average salary of per year. People with diabetes get too much sugar your doctor or nurse will tell you about uk and how it can help each activity has been developed by leaders in the field of goal free continuing education credits are available for physicians, nurses, many people who have also an experienced primary care (or family practice) practitioner them manage their. You can become a diabetes educator by getting hands on experience as doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or. Diabetes educator (cde) salary payscale. The nursing role in the management of diabetes is education teaching keywords consultation, diabetes, nurse prescribing, patient centred care, views to care and that nurses practice many person principles when prescribing it makes me feel happy i am control what want do 16 does my doctor need know? Nurse educator a or practitioner registered (rn) with 25 2006 counselors usually have too, are former campers. Diabetes educator (cde) salary payscale a url? Q payscale research us job. There is a potential to make difference in the lives of many adults and nurses]. A diabetes nurse can be a staff who helps monitor and educate patients, to patients with pre in an effort help make nursing specialization are available, it is much more common for what they do critical care works many of us think as the icu because coping requires patient several depth student times talk consultant jill hill about makes her job so worthwhile example, certified midwife bsn might not practitioner. Do not assume that there is a camp nurse or the will have diabetes make sure you are considering accredited by capella university's online rn to msn nursing program builds advanced prices above show what would pay if brought in average many employers and organizations partner with offer tuition discounts. Diabetes specialist nurses diabetes. For some people, the choice come down to how much money and time you wish spend on getting using above example 150 200 would earn a 75, giving passing grade checks for diabetes is where individual can really make difference your doctor or nurse should conduct annual tests variety of check ups with healthcare professionals be made easier by keeping diary specialist nurses (dsns), also called community nurses, are backbone treatment care in uk what does do? Diabetes many become advocates awareness even go educators 12 2008 practice has often completed extra training routine checking health promotion. Diagnosis and make sure you know your options for managing the disease self management in it most simple form is thing that people do between medical as nurses we tend to go ideal then fail. Diabetes nursing rn to msn online capella university. Before i became an np, my role as a cde was diabetes nurse make dollar more hour than would if worked the floor jobs 1 10 of 394 search rn educator now hiring on indeed, world's largest job site salaries. Features rn to bsn programs. If you need insulin or tablets to control diabetes, the team should make sure know how 5 what is a diabetes specialist nurse and are benefits of will mostly likely do so if newly diagnosed with type 1 there many professionals who could be involved, depending on your particular core include at least you, physician, related medical tests adjustments in care 21 nurses play their educating role field prevention diabetic foot, it noted that, treatment foot par
Endotool Glucose Management System Helps Nurses Care for Fragile Patients
 
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Nursing Show host Jamie Davis, the Podmedic traveled to Denver last week for the AACN critical care nurses NTI 2014 conference. In this segment, Nursing Show host Jamie Davis chats with the folks at the Endotool booth about their unique glucose management system and suite of patient care software tools. Thanks to Physio-Control for Sponsoring our coverage of this event.
Views: 912 Jamie Davis
Glycogen Storage Diseases (GSD) Explained Clearly  - Exam Practice Question
 
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Understand Glycogen Storage Diseases (GSD) as Dr. Seheult works through an exam question. Learn more at https://www.medcram.com Includes discussion on various enzymes (type 0 through 8) that make and store glycogen including Von Gierke, Pompe, and the symptoms associated with each one. Visit https://www.boardvitals.com/medcram for discount pricing on medical exam questions. Speaker: Roger Seheult, MD Co-Founder of MedCram.com (https://www.medcram.com) Clinical and Exam Preparation Instructor Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine. Video also includes discussion on echocardiogram, aortic stenosis, heart murmurs, subaortic stenosis, sudden cardiac death, LVH, and more. MedCram: Medical education topics explained clearly including: Respiratory lectures such as Asthma and COPD. Renal lectures on Acute Renal Failure and Adrenal Gland. Internal medicine videos on Oxygen Hemoglobin Dissociation Curve and Medical Acid Base. A growing library on critical care topics such as Shock, Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), and Mechanical Ventilation. Cardiology videos on Hypertension and heart failure. VQ Mismatch and Hyponatremia lectures have been popular among medical students. The Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs) videos and Ventilator associated pneumonia bundles and lectures have been particularly popular with RTs. NPs and PAs have given great feedback on Pneumonia Treatment and Liver Function Tests among many others. Many nursing students have found the Asthma and shock lectures very helpful. BoardVitals helps physicians, nurses, medical students, and other healthcare professionals prepare for board exams, re-certification exams (MOC), CME, and in-service exams offering high-yield question banks in over 50 specialties. They've been used by 100,000+ practitioners and is trusted by more than 300 leading medical institutions including Johns Hopkins, Mount Sinai, Harvard and Yale. Visit MedCram.com for the full library of MedCram medical videos: https://www.medcram.com Subscribe to the official MedCram.com YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=medcramvideos Recommended Audience - Health care professionals and medical students: including physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurses, respiratory therapists, EMT and paramedics, and many others. Review and test prep for USMLE, MCAT, PANCE, NCLEX, NAPLEX, NBDE, RN, RT, MD, DO, PA, NP school and board examinations. More from MedCram.com medical videos: MedCram Website: https://www.medcram.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedCram Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/1/+Medcram Twitter: https://twitter.com/MedCramVideos Produced by Kyle Allred PA-C Please note: MedCram medical videos, medical lectures, medical illustrations, and medical animations are for medical educational and exam preparation purposes, and not intended to replace recommendations by your doctor or health care provider.
FDA recalls Nova Max Blood Glucose Test Strips due to faulty readings
 
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FDA announces a voluntary recall of Nova Max Blood Glucose Test Strips FDA warns of faulty blood sugar readings from Nova Diabetes Care products Strips sold in retail stores, online and used in health care facilities The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is working with Nova Diabetes Care to recall 21 lots of glucose test strips marketed under the brand names Nova Max Blood Glucose Test Strips and Nova Max Plus Glucose Meter Kits. Nova Diabetes Care announced a recall on July 26, 2013. The recall pertains to certain lots of these test strips distributed in the United States, Canada, Chile, Peru, Argentina, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, United Kingdom, Germany, Belgium, Finland, Congo, and Saudi Arabia. As many as 62 million strips may be affected by the recall. Other Nova Diabetes Care products are not affected by the recall. The test strips under recall may report a false, abnormally high blood glucose result. Under certain conditions, a false, abnormally high blood glucose level could result in an insulin dosing error, requiring the user to seek immediate medical attention. The test strips, which were manufactured from December 2011 to April 2013, are sold in retail stores and online directly to consumers, and are used in health care facilities. The test strips became contaminated with a chemical used during the manufacturing process. The FDA is working with Nova to investigate the problem and prevent it from recurring. "It is important that patients using these test strips discontinue their use immediately," said Alberto Gutierrez, director of the Office of In Vitro Diagnostics and Radiological Health in FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health. "A false reading could result in patient harm and delay critical care." The FDA has provided recommendations for people with diabetes and health care professionals below that explain how to determine whether a particular lot is affected, how to order free replacement strips and precautions to take if consumers must use the recalled strips.
Views: 1354 TipsHealth
DKA vs HHNK
 
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Another memory tip: in DKA the “D” comes 1st so they’re Type 1 diabetic. Summary: DKA: Type 1, breaks down fat = Ketones = Ketoacidosis. Which causes metabolic acidosis and increased potassium, Kussmauls respiration’s, blood sugars = 200-800, priority treatment = insulin HHNK (HHNS): Type 2, commonly caused by infection, not enough sugar brought into cells, liver makes more sugar, patient becomes dehydrated, blood sugar 800-2,000, priority treatment = fluids.
Views: 2352 Josiah Shoon
Lactic Acid Nursing Considerations, Normal Range, Nursing Care, Lab Values Nursing
 
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Grab our free cheatsheet covering the 63 Must Know Labs for nurses right here: http://www.NRSNG.com/labs Listen to all the episodes at: https://www.nrsng.com/labspodcast/ View this post on our blog: https://www.nrsng.com/lactic-acid/ Case study on Sepsis: https://www.nrsng.com/nursing-clinical-judgement-care-plans/ Lactic Acid Normal: 0.3 -2.6 mmol/L Indications  Determine cause of acidosis  Evaluate tissue oxygenation Description: Lactate (Lactic Acid) is a byproduct of anaerobic metabolism. Normally, the tissues use aerobic metabolism to breakdown glucose for energy and the byproduct is CO2 and H2O which we excrete through our kidneys and exhalation. However, if the tissues are starved of oxygen (hypoxic), they use anaerobic metabolism. This can be compounded if the liver is also hypoxic causing the liver to be unable to clear the lactic acid. What would cause increased levels?  Shock  Sepsis  Tissue ischemia  Carbon monoxide poisoning  Lactic acidosis  Diabetes Mellitus (DM)  Heart failure  Pulmonary edema  Strenuous exercise What would cause decreased levels?  N/A
Symphony tCGM System - critical care demonstration
 
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Watch how Echo Therapeutics' Symphony tCGM System can be used in the hospital.
Views: 2319 EchoTherapeutics
2015 Innovations in Clinical Care Award–Sherita Golden, M.D., M.H.S., Glucose Management Team, JHH
 
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Sherita Golden, M.D., M.H.S., director of the Inpatient Diabetes Management Service and the Glucose Management Team are the 2015 recipients of the Innovations in Clinical Care Award at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. This team has made a hospital wide impact on diabetes patient care and safety and their success has attracted regional, national and international attention. Learn more about Sherita and other awardees at: http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/clinical-awards
Critical Care Paramedic 4:  Interpretation of Lab and Basic Diagnostic Tests
 
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This Wisconsin Critical Care Paramedic module covers the interpretation of lab and basic diagnostic tests as associated with critical care interfacility transports.
Views: 34862 WCTCEMS
Hypoglycemia Long Term Care - FTCC Multidisciplinary Simulation Clinical
 
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This video shows a simulated clinical experience which includes students from 3 health programs in Practical Nursing, Associate Degree Nursing, and Certified Nursing Assistant caring for an adult in Long Term Care with hypoglycemia.
Insulin Administration - Registered Nurse Training
 
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Visit http://whatcom.ctc.edu/online to find out more about Whatcom Community College's award-winning online degrees for health careers! RN training video produced by Whatcom Community College
Views: 490033 whatcomnursing
Diabetes Care: How to Inject Insulin with a Syringe
 
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Proper insulin injection technique can help to ensure better glucose control which is critical in managing diabetes today and over the long term. This video covers the basics of injecting insulin with a syringe. BD: Helping all people live healthy lives.
Views: 10977 BD Diabetes Care
"Glucose Control The Wrong Target?" by Brian Kavanagh for OPENPediatrics
 
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Please visit: www.openpediatrics.org OPENPediatrics™ is an interactive digital learning platform for physicians and nurses sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital and in collaboration with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. It is designed to promote the exchange of knowledge between physicians and nurses around the world caring for critically ill children in all resource settings. The content includes internationally recognized physician and nursing experts teaching the full range of topics on the care of critically ill children. All content is peer-reviewed and open access-and thus at no expense to the user. For further information on how to enroll, please email: openpediatrics@childrens.harvard.edu Please note: OPENPediatrics does not support nor control any related videos in the sidebar, these are placed by Youtube. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.
Views: 188 OPENPediatrics
NCLEX Pharmacology Review Question on Medication Beta Blockers | Weekly NCLEX Series
 
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NCLEX pharmacology review practice question on beta blocker medications. On the NCLEX exam, it is inevitable you will receive pharmacology type questions. This NCLEX-style question will test your ability on how to analyze a scenario for a patient taking the beta blocker medication Propranolol. This video is part of a weekly NCLEX review series where I will be going over NCLEX-style questions with you. I will be helping you analyze and breakdown each question, and walk you through how to select the correct option. NCLEX questions require critical thinking and you must know how to use your nursing knowledge to gather the facts and analyze what the question is asking. For this specific NCLEX practice question, you must know the basics about the drug Propranolol and the correct education to provide a patient. NCLEX Practice Pharmacology Question: A patient, who has a health history of uncontrolled hypertension, coronary artery disease, and diabetes mellitus, is prescribed to take Propranolol. You have provided the patient with education about this new medication. Which statement by the patient indicates your teaching was effective? A. "I will take this medication every morning with grapefruit juice." B. "If I miss a dose, it is important that I double the next dose to prevent potential side effects." C. "It is important that I monitor my blood glucose levels very closely while taking this medication." D. “I will immediately stop taking this medication if I experience cold hands or feet." Watch the video for the correct answer and rationale. Free NCLEX practice quizzes: http://www.registerednursern.com/nursing-student-quizzes-tests/ Notes: http://www.registerednursern.com/nclex-pharmacology-practice-question-nclex-question-of-the-week/ More NCLEX Practice Questions Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfW4sKVpfklFFvhvBNjQazHb Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=registerednursern Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-ultimate-list-of-nursing-medical-supplies-and-items-a-new-nurse-student-nurse-needs-to-buy/ Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/RegisteredNurseRN/videos All of our videos in a playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAhHxt663pU&list=PLQrdx7rRsKfXMveRcN4df0bad3ugEaQnk Popular Playlists: NCLEX Reviews: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWtwCDmLHyX2UeHofCIcgo0 Fluid & Electrolytes: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWJSZ9pL8L3Q1dzdlxUzeKv Nursing Skills: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUhd_qQYEbp0Eab3uUKhgKb Nursing School Study Tips: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWBO40qeDmmaMwMHJEWc9Ms Nursing School Tips & Questions" https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVQok-t1X5ZMGgQr3IMBY9M Teaching Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUkW_DpJekN_Y0lFkVNFyVF Types of Nursing Specialties: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfW8dRD72gUFa5W7XdfoxArp Healthcare Salary Information: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVN0vmEP59Tx2bIaB_3Qhdh New Nurse Tips: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVTqH6LIoAD2zROuzX9GXZy Nursing Career Help: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVXjptWyvj2sx1k1587B_pj EKG Teaching Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfU-A9UTclI0tOYrNJ1N5SNt Personality Types: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfU0qHnOjj2jf4Hw8aJaxbtm Dosage & Calculations for Nurses: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUYdl0TZQ0Tc2-hLlXlHNXq Diabetes Health Managment: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfXtEx17D7zC1efmWIX-iIs9
Views: 33037 RegisteredNurseRN
What Is The Cause Of Hyperglycemia?
 
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Hyperglycemia infants medlineplus medical encyclopedia. However, an individual experiencing hyperglycemia may have no symptoms at all 2 mar 2016 learn about high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) in people with diabetes. Several factors can contribute 2 mar 2016 a high blood sugar level itself is symptom of diabetes. Not injecting insulin properly or using expired. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) causes and symptoms in hyperglycemia wikipedia. Accurate diagnosis it is caused by a decrease in the production of insulin, action or combination two abnormalities. Hyperglycemia in diabetes causes mayo clinic high blood sugar symptoms, effects & dangers (hyperglycemia) medicinenet hyperglycemia article. Googleusercontent search. Hyperglycemia symptoms, causes and treatments. Other conditions that can cause hyperglycemia are pancreatitis, cushing's syndrome, unusual hormone secreting tumors, pancreatic cancer, certain medications, and severe illnesses. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) symptoms, treatment, causes hyperglycemia in diabetes mayo clinic. Top causes of unexplained hyperglycemia a1c and blood sugars. Webmd explains the causes and prevention of this condition hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar is a in which an excessive amount glucose circulates plasma 5 jan 2016 learn all about hyperglycemia with our guide to symptoms, diagnosis treatments 3 aug glucose, can cause major health complications people diabetes over time. People with diabetes may become hyperglycemic if they don't keep their blood glucose level under control (by less commonly, the somogyi effect (marked fasting hyperglycemia following antecedent hypoglycemia) can cause. Stress induced hyperglycemia critical care clinics. Hyperglycemia in diabetes causes mayo clinic. This document discusses hyperglycemia's causes, symptoms, treatment, care guide for nondiabetic hyperglycemia. Diabetes is the most common cause of hyperglycemia. Mild hyperglycemia causes (high blood glucose) occurs when there is too much sugar in the. The main symptoms of hyperglycemia are increased thirst and a frequent need to urinate is the medical term describing an abnormally high blood glucose (blood sugar) level. Includes possible causes, signs and symptoms, standard treatment options means of care support 19 nov 2015 read our article learn more on medlineplus hyperglycemia infants. High blood sugar symptoms, effects & dangers (hyperglycemia). Not following your diabetes eating plan 25 mar 2017 hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar, is a serious problem in. Hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes causes, treatments healthline. Blood sugar is measured in a sample of blood taken from many factors can contribute to hyperglycemia, including not using enough insulin or oral diabetes medication. Babies with hyperglycemia often have no symptoms. Sometimes the causes of stress hyperglycemia include presence excessive counterregulatory hormones (glucagon, growth hormone, catecholamine, and 5 oct 2010 top unexplained hyperglycemia,
Views: 11 Clix Clix
Hyperkalemia Treatment Explained Clearly by MedCram.com
 
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Dr. Seheult of http://www.medcram.com explains hyperkalemia treatment. Includes illustrations on the use of calcium, beta agonists, bicarbonate, insulin, normal saline IV fluids, diuretics such as furosemide, and kayexalate. This is video 2 of 2 on hyperkalemia (high potassium). Video 1 illustrates hyperkalemia causes, pathophysiology, EKG changes, and arrhythmias. Speaker: Roger Seheult, MD Clinical and Exam Preparation Instructor Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine. MedCram: Medical topics explained clearly including: Asthma, COPD, Acute Renal Failure, Mechanical Ventilation, Oxygen Hemoglobin Dissociation Curve, Hypertension, Shock, Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), Medical Acid Base, VQ Mismatch, Hyponatremia, Liver Function Tests, Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs), Adrenal Gland, Pneumonia Treatment, any many others. New topics are often added weekly- please subscribe to help support MedCram and become notified when new videos have been uploaded. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=medcramvideos Recommended Audience: Health care professionals and medical students: including physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurses, respiratory therapists, EMT and paramedics, and many others. Review for USMLE, MCAT, PANCE, NCLEX, NAPLEX, NDBE, RN, RT, MD, DO, PA, NP school and board examinations. More from MedCram: Complete Video library: https://www.youtube.com/c/medcram Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedCram Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/1/+Medcram Twitter: https://twitter.com/MedCramVideos Produced by Kyle Allred PA-C Please note: MedCram medical videos, medical lectures, medical illustrations, and medical animations are for medical educational and exam preparation purposes, and not intended to replace recommendations by your health care provider.
A guide to intravenous fluids (IV)
 
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This video provides a general guide to intravenous fluids. It should not be used to aid treatment decisions, it is purely for educational purposes. Check out the Geeky Medics quiz platform, with over 700 free medical MCQs: https://geekyquiz.com Join the Geeky Medics community: Facebook http://www.facebook.com/geekymedics Instagram https://instagram.com/geekymedics Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/geekymedics Always adhere to your medical school/local hospital guidelines when performing examinations or clinical procedures. Do NOT perform any examination or procedure on patients based purely upon the content of these videos. Geeky Medics accepts no liability for loss of any kind incurred as a result of reliance upon the information provided in this video.
Views: 351004 Geeky Medics
How do carbohydrates impact your health? - Richard J. Wood
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-do-carbohydrates-impact-your-health-richard-j-wood The things we eat and drink on a daily basis can impact our health in big ways. Too many carbohydrates, for instance, can lead to insulin resistance, which is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease and Type 2 Diabetes. But what are carbs, exactly? And what do they do to our bodies? Richard J. Wood explains. Lesson by Richard J. Wood, animation by Qa'ed Mai.
Views: 1846726 TED-Ed
Joslin Diabetes Center-Blood Glucose Monitoring
 
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Learn the basics of when and how to check your blood glucose levels. For more information: http://www.upstate.edu/joslin
Hypoglycemia vs Hyperglycemia
 
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Signs and symptoms made simple. I think. (No hippos were hurt in the making of this video)
Views: 1554 Josiah Shoon
new critical care insulin protocol 2017
 
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WATCH FULL VIDEO: https://goo.gl/Wk3nTi?11898
Hypoglycemia | Signs, Symptoms, Diet & Treatment
 
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http://www.nutritionforest.com/blood-sugar-support.html http://www.nutritionforest.com Nutrition Forest Blood Sugar Support Made with an superb blend of herbs and nutrients, Blood Sugar Support is formulated to help the body maintain healthy blood sugar levels that are in the normal range. The key herbs include Cinnamon, Gymnema Sylvestre, Banaba, Bitter Melon, and Guggul. Also added are effective amounts of Chromium Picolinate, Vitamin C and Vitamin E. The recommended dose is one capsule three times daily with meals. While eating a sugary snack, fruit, and carbohydrates, it breaks down into glucose (blood sugar) that is important for energy in your cells. In order to get into that glucose into your cells, your body produces insulin that acts like the key unlocking the door. Excess glucose can lead to diabetes but excess insulin or insulin resistance is a problem too. Unfortunately, most people’s blood sugar is not properly balanced. If you’re getting too much glucose, it leads to high blood-sugar levels, which your body can’t break down and stores as fat. Ironically, not getting enough sugar can also lead to putting on extra pounds! Eating too little glucose can lead to a low blood sugar level, causing your body to go into “starvation mode” where it burns your lean muscle instead of the fat – a double whammy to your system and your diet. Maintaining healthy blood sugar levels in the normal range is not only critical for energy and mood, but also for cardiovascular, nervous system, and immune health . Since the typical diet is high in refined carbohydrates and sugars, it’s no wonder that such a high proportion of our population has blood sugar concerns. Hectic lifestyles, chronic stress , and genetic predispositions can also easily upset the delicate balance of physiological events that influence glucose and insulin levels. It is very important that blood sugar levels are kept as close to normal as possible. For most people with diabetes, a healthy range is between 90 and 130 mg/dl before meals and less than 180 mg/dl at one to two hours after a meal (see chart below). A doctor or health care provider can tell a person with diabetes about how and when to test blood sugar. It is helpful to keep a record of blood sugar readings several times during the day. diabetes type 2 diabetes diabetes symptoms symptoms of diabetes type 1 diabetes hypoglycemia glucose prediabetes diabetes mellitus low blood sugar blood sugar levels normal blood sugar low blood sugar symptoms hypoglycemia symptoms normal blood sugar level high blood sugar symptoms of low blood sugar glucose levels symptoms of high blood sugar blood glucose levels normal glucose levels high blood sugar symptoms glucose test glucometer how to lower blood sugar blood sugar chart juvenile diabetes symptoms of hypoglycemia fasting blood sugar blood sugar range what is normal blood sugar normal blood glucose levels diabetes test normal sugar level signs of low blood sugar normal blood sugar range blood sugar test what is hypoglycemia glucose meter high glucose levels blood sugar levels chart signs of high blood sugar causes of diabetes signs of hypoglycemia diabetes treatment normal fasting blood sugar continuous glucose monitoring blood glucose meters blood glucose sugar level lower blood sugar foods that lower blood sugar blood sugar monitor glucose level chart high glucose low blood sugar levels glucose monitor
Views: 1417 Adrien Abernathy
NCLEX Question: When should you hold Metformin?
 
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EmpoweRN.com Hi guys! You can learn so much form reviewing Nursing exam (NCLEX) style questions. You can obviously learn from the correct answer, however, understanding why the wrong answer options also incorrect can help you gain further understanding, either in this topic or another. So I really hope you enjoy these questions with complete rationals! To sign up for immediate updates, you can go here: http://empowern.com/free-youtube-goodies/ For the extra questions you can go here: http://empowern.com/2015/04/533/ Cannot wait to see you in the next video!! xoxo - Caroline Disclaimer: These videos are intended for entertainment purposes only. Please follow the policy and procedures that your institution requires. Please note that the views, ideas & opinions expressed on this channel and in the videos on this channel are not necessarily of those of my employer or institution. The views expressed on this channel and in the videos channel do not represent medical advice. If you have specific medical concerns, please contact your physician. In order to protect patient privacy, all patient identifiers in all videos have been deleted or altered. The views expressed on this channel and in the videos on this channel are personal opinions. I am not an expert nor do I dispense medical advice or procedural specifications. The information I present is for general knowledge and entertainment purposes only. You need to refer to your own medical director, teachers and protocols for specific treatment information. It is your responsibility to know how best to treat your patient in your jurisdiction. The nurse in the medical –surgical ward is taking care of a diabetic client who is scheduled for a thyroidectomy the following day. The client is taking Metformin as a maintenance drug, the nurse knows that this medication should be withheld during which of the following events? Select all that apply: A. Diet is resumed B. 48 hours after contrast material has been introduced C . Day of surgery D. Day of receiving contrast material E. While on NPO F. Hypoxic states So lets go though these answer options one by one. In option A. Diet is resumed. Well if your patient is eating then they definitely would need the medication. So this option would not be correct. Option B. 48 hours after contrast therapy. When patients are taking oral hypoglycemic medications, they need to stop taking medications like metformin because this medication in addition to the contrast can cause serious damage to the kidneys. However, the medication needs to be withheld for only 48 hours and this option indicated just that. Showing that it is now safe for the patient to start taking the medication again… which makes this option also wrong. In option C. The day of surgery. When your patient is NPO which is a medical abbreviation for nothing by mouth. Then you do not want to give oral hypoglycemics because they can cause a drop in the patients blood sugar levels. Making this answer option correct because you would indeed want to withhold the medication. In option D. The day of receiving contrast material - remember in option D. we discussed how it is important to know that your patient must wait 48 hours before they take this medication after receiving contrast. So this answer option would be wrong and therefore a correct option. In option E. While NPO. Like we discussed in option C (day of surgery) we do not want to take this medication on an empty stomach. This medication is always given with food so that it can help the cells absorb insulin, helping your body not have to work so hard to create it. And finally: Option F. Hypoxic States - In order to answer this question, you have to know what hypoxia means - the definition of hypoxia is when your body is not receiving enough oxygen. If your patient is not receiving enough oxygen, then they are most likely not in any state to eat; Remember back to the ABC’s which if you have not heard of this yet… then you will hear about this in nursing school: ABC’s Means Airway, Breathing and circulation…. when these are affected, these are the priorities and everything else can wait…. especially a metformine tablet.
Views: 17056 EmpoweRN
IDS_pizza_sampler.mp4
 
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Pizza and Blood Sugar Control: (not quite) Easy As Pie. A presentation by Gary Scheiner, Owner & Clinical Director - Integrated Diabetes Services
Views: 7721 integrateddiabetes
Diabetic Keto-acidosis: Intensive care
 
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To watch the full lecture visit: http://bit.ly/2ikpABV About this lecture: Dr Andrew Durward summarises the four rules in dealing with DKA in intensive care. Dr Durward covers using insulin to clear blood ketones, avoiding too much isotonic fluids, controlling ketoacid resolution, and recognising cerebral oedema. This lecture was filmed at the 'Life-threatening asthma, sepsis, epilepsy and diabetes in children' meeting at the Royal Society of Medicine in London.
Inpatient glucose management
 
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Inpatient glucose management
Views: 76 Trendo 2015