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Arthritis Of The Fingers types and patterns - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes conditions associated with arthritis of the fingers. Diagnosing arthritis of the finger can is difficult. Arthritis can affect any joint in the body but it is commonly seen in the joints of the fingers. There are different types of arthritis and the pattern of joint involvement: 1- Generalized osteoarthritis: Heberden’s nodes: Heberden's nodes are hard or bony swellings that can develop in the distal interphalangeal joints (DIP) and may or not be painful. Heberden’s nodes are caused by the formation of osteophytes due to repeated trauma at the joint and usually occurs during middle age. Bouchard’s nodes: Bouchard's nodes are bony growths that can form on the proximal interphalangeal joints of the finger (PIP). Bouchard’s nodes, like Heberden’s node, may or may not be painful. Bouchard’s nodes are typically associated with limited motion of the affected joint. Mucous cyst: small, fluid-filled sacs that form between the DIP joint of the finger and the bottom of the fingernail. The best treatment is surgical excision of the cyst and removal of the underlying osteophyte to decrease the risk of recurrence. 2- Psoriasis: it is an inflammatory form of arthritis and sometimes confused with osteoarthritis. Dactylitis is also referred to as “sausage digit”. It is inflammation of the entire digit. Sausage finger is a major finding of psoriatic arthritis. Nail pitting is small depressions in the finger nails and it is most common in people who have psoriasis. 3- Gout: gout is a form of inflammatory arthritis that is sometimes called “gouty arthritis”. Gouty arthritis will mimic infection and may develop in people who have high levels of uric acid in the blood. The uric acid can form needle like crystals in the joint and cause pain, tenderness, swelling and tenosynovitis. Periarticular erosions seen on x-ray may also be present with gout of the finger joints. Periarticular erosions are usually multiple and bilateral with sclerotic borders. 4- Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis: ANA positive in 30%. Rheumatoid factor is negative in a child and later on it may become positive. Shortened digits. Polyarticular rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) is a form of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis that affects five or more joints. Polyarticular in about 30%. Pauciarticular onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a form of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis that affects less than five joints. Pauciarticular in about 50%. In pauciarticular onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, check the iris of the eye for iridocyclitis. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC
Views: 70113 nabil ebraheim
Osteoarthritis Of The Fingers, Heberden's Nodes - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes the osteoarthritis of the fingers - Heberden's nodes, Bouchard's nodes. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC Donate to the University of Toledo Foundation Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Endowed Chair Fund: https://www.utfoundation.org/foundation/home/Give_Online.aspx?sig=29 Background music provided as a free download from YouTube Audio Library. Song Title: Every Step
Views: 37156 nabil ebraheim
Finger Arthritis (DIP Fusion)
 
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Finger arthritis can cause debilitating pain. A fusion of the finger joint is an extraordinarily effective means of eliminating the arthritis and pain. My technique with a headless screw is minimally invasive and provides the patient a fast recovery. Please enjoy watching and subscribe to my channel! Mark Elzik, MD South Orange County Orthopaedics http://www.socortho.com
Views: 8831 Mark Elzik MD
Rheumatoid Arthritis of the hand - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes the condition of rheumatoid arthritis, the etiology, signs and symptoms, the diagnostic tests and indications, and the treatment options and prognosis. Rheumatoid Arthritis involves the synovium of the joints. The condition of rheumatoid arthritis will result in deformities. Rheumatoid Arthritis occurs in females more than males. There may be a hereditary component with Rheumatoid Arthritis. Rheumatoid Arthritis has spontaneous remissions and exacerbations. The disease can have a systemic nature. Pain and stiffness of joints especially in the morning (morning stiffness). Rheumatoid Arthritis is typically polyarticular, bilateral and symmetrical and most commonly affects the hands and feet. x-rays show periarticular erosions at the time of diagnosis. Osteopenia and minimal osteophyte formation favor the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Pathogenesis Rheumatoid Arthritis is an autoimmune disease. The disease has two components: immunological reaction. Increased degradative enzymes. The IgM (Rheumatoid factor) is produced by the plasma cell as ana antibody to the native IgG, which is altered in RA. 70% of patient with RA have rheumatoid factor positive. Leucocytes are attracted to the immune complex forming deposits over the inflammatory surface of the synovium. These leucocytes ingest fibrin and immune complex and is called the Rheumatoid cells. The leucocytes release lysosomal enzymes that cause acute inflammatory response and tissue necrosis as well as inflammatory mediators ( IL-1, IL-6, TNF alpha). The chondrocytes respond to stimulation by TNF- alpha, IL-1 and other inflammatory mediators causing cells to become activated and secrete more metalloproteinases which lead to cartilage damage. The synovium becomes hypertrophied (pannus), showing intimal hyperplasia and infiltration by plasma cells and lymphocytes. Stages of Rheumatoid Arthritis Early: acute: hot swollen tender joints (synovitis) •MCP swelling •Wrist swelling •Flexor sheath synovitis Complicated: digital vasculitis, ecchymosis, skin atrophy, nodules. Advanced •Swelling of MCP joints •Lateral slippage of extensor tendon ruptures •Ulnar deviation of fingers •Xrays show destruction of MCP with subluxation, ulnar deviation and wrist destruction. •Finger deformities: Mallet, boutonniere, Swan neck The thumb is also involved. These changes occur due to proliferation, inflammation and hypertrophy of the synovium. Involvement of the distal radioulnar joint is usually associated with rupture of the extensor digiti minimi. Rheumatoid nodules 25% of patients with RA will have subcutaneous nodules on extensor surfaces of elbow and forearm. Nodules are often multiple and seen along the ulnar margin of the forearm or pulp of the digits. Vasculitis is more common in patients with SC nodules, it is strongly seropositive disease (aggressive) with less favorable prognosis. Treatment •Synovitis: splint and medical treatment •Joint space narrowing, bone erosions and osteopenia: synovectomy. •Joint destruction/fixed deformity/ loss of hand function: surgery based on condition Before operating on RA patients, x-ray of the cervical spine is needed because the patient may have subluxation of C1-C2. Metacarpophalangeal joint arthroplasty of the fingers usually results in decreased extensor lag and improvement of the ulnar drift. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC
Views: 93447 nabil ebraheim
Dislocations Of The Finger - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Educational video describing joint dislocations of the finger. Metacarpophalangeal joint disloctions •Dislocations of the metacarpohalangeal joint can be either simple or complex. Metacarpophalangeal joint dislocation with volar plate injury or entrapment. •Simple dislocations are reducible and present with hyperextension posture. Some contact remains between the base of P1 and the metacarpal head. The volar plate stays volar. Reduction can be achieved with simple flexion of the joint. •Complex dislocations (irreducible ): widened joint space due to entrapment of the volar plate/sesamoid in the joint space. Occurs more in the index finger. •Dorsal dislocations are the most common. Usually stable after reduction. Volar dislocation are rare and particularly unstable and require surgery. Proximal interphalangeal joint dislocations (PIP) •Dislocation may be dorsal or volar. •Dorsal dislocations are usually distal with or without a small flake of bone. Immobilize in flexion. •Volar dislocations: long finger is the most common one dislocated followed by the ring finger. volar dislocation/central slip disruption. Immobilize in extension. It results in Boutonniere deformity if not treated properly. •Irreducible dislocation: head of P1 protrudes between the central slip and one lateral band. It creates a noose effect preventing reduction especially if excessive traction is applied. Distal interphalangeal joint fracture dislocations (DIP) •Dorsal dislocations without tendon rupture are rare. They are unstable and should be immobilized in some flexion. Mallet finger deformity may be associated with an avulsion fracture. The patient is unable to straighten the DIP joint due to the avulsion injury of the extensor tendon. Check the stability of the joint. •Treatment Mallet finger with subluxation of DIP joint is an indication for surgery. May require closed reduction and pinning of the fracture or the joint. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC
Views: 66083 nabil ebraheim
What Causes Arthritis In The Fingers?
 
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Rheumatoid arthritis symptoms nhs. Pictures of arthritis in fingers and knuckles healthline. Do i have arthritis? Arthritis foundation. Different dmards may be useful for a number of different forms arthritis including rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and psoriatic all which can affect the fingers or wrists. Finger ra finger joint pain and inflammation webmd hand webmd rheumatoid arthritis "imx0m" url? Q webcache. It should be carried out quickly, efficiently and timely. Googleusercontent search. The main symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis are joint pain, swelling and stiffness. Arthritis causes, types, and treatments medical news today. Rheumatoid arthritis affects the cells that line and normally lubricate joints (synovial disease modifying anti rheumatic drugs (dmards) are work slowly to modify course of inflammatory. Finger ra finger joint pain and inflammation webmd. The most common form of arthritis is osteoarthritis. The article looks at the types, causes, and treatments, including natural 14 aug 2017 when joints in your fingers begin to hurt, it can limit daily activities. When inflammation and related symptoms become acute, it is visit a doctor he or she will prescribe you the best treatment for arthritis in fingers. Additionally, the tissues and ligaments designed to hold joints in place grow weaker as arthritis progresses. Arthritis in fingers symptoms and signs treatment for finger arthritis. Osteoarthritis is also known as degenerative arthritis because of the degeneration cartilage that causes it. Arthritis of the finger joints has many causes, and arthritic can make it hard to do daily activities due pain deformity. Genetics can also play a factor in the development of osteoarthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common forms in hand, addition to osteoarthritis and post traumatic. Read more symptoms bony outgrowths on the finger joints, which can interfere with hand function and cause fingers to look deformed. Arthritis in hands symptoms, treatment, and home remedies. If you have pain the hand, understand potential causes of hand or wrist including arthritis, injury other conditions. Gout medications wrist, hand & finger pain causes. Unbearable pain or progressive deformity from arthritis may signal over time, the destruction of bone and joint tissue cause fingers thumbs to become permanently deformed. Among the over 100 different types of arthritis conditions, osteoarthritis is most common and affects 20 1 aug 2012 for example, psoriatic arthritis, a type related to skin condition psoriasis, likely cause pain in joints closest fingernails (called distal joints), while osteoarthritis, form cartilage can wear down all fingers thumb affect any joint body, it be debilitating when hands. What causes arthritis in the fingers? to do for early, mild osteoarthritis of hands medicinenet. Preventing arthritis in the hands tips and more healthline. Finger arthritis in finger hand rheumatoid signs and symptoms health. It may also ca
MCP and IP joint mobilizations
 
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Traction Palmar glides for restricted flexion Dorsal glides for restricted extension Radial and Ulnar glides for generalized hypomobility
Views: 67956 Joint Mobilizations
Live Surgery: Ganglion Cyst: Distal Interphalangeal Joint (Finger)
 
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www.hand411.com www.MPSurgery.com Digital mucous cysts (DMCs) are benign ganglion cysts of the digits, typically located at the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints or in the proximal nail fold. They usually occur on the hands, although they have also been noted on the toes. The etiology of these cysts is uncertain but may involve mucoid degeneration. Often, these cysts are asymptomatic and do not require treatment. When treatment is indicated, medical therapies and surgical interventions of varying magnitudes may be attempted. Recurrence is common. Historically, little attention has been directed at studying these cysts despite their frequency. In the literature, they have been referred to as cystomata, myxomatous cutaneous cysts, myxomatous degenerative cysts, periarticular fibromas, synovial lesions of the skin, periungual ganglions, mucous cysts, myxoid cysts, synovial cysts, dorsal cysts, nail cysts, cystic nodules, digital mucoid cysts, digital myxoid cysts, and digital mucinous pseudocysts. Hippocrates first appreciated ganglion cysts, describing a knot of tissue full of fluid. In 1746, Eller concluded that ganglia formed from the herniation of the synovial lining of a joint. In 1882, Hyde first described the digital mucous cyst. In 1893, Ledderhose suggested that ganglia arose spontaneously in the subcutaneous tissue. In 1895, Ritschel proposed the earliest formulation of the theory that mucoid degeneration may be responsible for digital mucous cysts; Carp and Stout popularized the theory in 1928. Then, in 1947, Anderson reported that cysts caused the nail deformities. The mechanism of formation of digital mucous cysts is unknown. Currently, it is believed that the cysts arise from mucoid degeneration of connective tissue and that this process, in most cases, involves communication with the adjacent DIP joint and possible coexistence of osteoarthritis. Clinical and radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis is common at the site of the cysts,[1] and the frequent presence of osteophytes and spurring of the DIP joint were recognized in the 1970s. Active connection to the joint space may or may not exist, as the mucoblasts associated with the cyst appear capable of sustaining the process. Ganglia are the most common tumor or cyst of the hand. They account for approximately 70% of all such tumors or cysts, with digital mucous cysts comprising 10-15% of the total. Women are affected more often than men (female-to-male ratio of 2-2.5:1). Source: Medscape
Views: 106224 Dr Thomas McClellan
Infections Of The Finger - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Educational video describing infection types of the fingers and hand. Infection of the finger is a common problem that can vary in severity. Serious infection of the fingers may require urgent surgical care. Felon •Deep infection of the soft pad, or pulp of the fingertip. Usually the result of a puncture wound. •Swelling or pus is trapped in the small compartments of the pulp or the tip of the finger. Symptoms: •Unusual redness or swelling •Throbbing pain at the tip of the finger •Firm swelling •Visible pus If the infection goes untreated, it may lead to severe symptoms such as skin necrosis, flexor tenosynovitis, osteomyelitis and arthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint. Treatment: •antibiotics if the infection is caught early. •Surgery is the usual treatment: incision and drainage of the felon. Paronychia •Infection involving the soft tissues around the fingernail. Most common bacterial infection of the hand and is often associated with a simple hangnail. Symptoms: •Swelling •Redness •Pus formation •Pain in the soft tissue around the nail plate. Treatment: •antibiotics if the infection is caught early. •Surgery is the usual treatment: incision and drainage with or without partial nail removal for subungal abcess. Herpetic whitlow •Painful infection caused by the herpes simplex virus that usually affects the fingers or thumb. •Commonly contracted by dental workers and medical workers exposed to oral secretions and can occur in infants. Symptoms •Swelling and tenderness •Redness •Vesicle formation •Fever •Swollen lymph nodes Treatment •Conservative: the infection is self-limiting. Antiviral treatments applied to the skin (Acyclovir). Antibiotics are not used unless secondary infection is present. Drainage of the vesicles may lead to viral encephalitis. Flexor tenosynovitis •Relatively common infection of the hand usually caused by staphylococcus aureus. Usually occurs due to prior penetrating trauma and infection. The index, middle, and ring fingers are most commonly affected. Symptoms •Painful swelling of the finger that hurts worse with motion. •Kanavel’s four cardinal signs: 1-Uniform swelling of the entire finger 2-The finger is flexed 3-Intense pain when attempting to straighten the finger. occurs early. 4-Tenderness along the course of the tendon sheta. Most important sign. Treatment •If infection is caught early: IV antibiotics •If infection is severe: open drainage. Early drainage of the infection to avoid skin loss, tendon necrosis, and osteomyelitis. The posterolateral incision is better than a zig-zag incision. Avoid indwelling catheter. Infection may spread from the tendon into the deep palmar space or to the Parona’s space in the forearm. The little finger communicates with the ulnar bursa. The thumb communicates with the radial bursa. The radial and ulnar bursa communicate proximal to the carpal tunnel. Infection may travel from the little finger into the ulnar bursa to the parona’s space. Infection can also travel from the thumb into the radial bursa to the parona’s space. Infection may cause “horse shoe” tenosynovitis. Infection travels from the thumb through the radial bursa to the ulnar bursa infecting the little finger. may need combination of incisions for drainage. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC
Views: 37712 nabil ebraheim
The Office: Live Case Study: DNA & Arthritic Finger Pain - Preview
 
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http://www.doane.us Welcome to Doane Online Education. A modern perspective on Chinese Medicine; concerned only with clinical efficacy. Doane Online Education is the home of DNA (Distal Needling Acupuncture) and MPD (Medical Pulse Diagnosis). We provide free and membership-only acupuncture and Chinese Medicine webinars. This is a short preview of our weekly office episodes. Get in touch with Robert Doane and DNA/ MPD practitioners: http://www.doane.us/#!blog/c13zr http://www.facebook.com/groups/Distal.Needling.Acupuncture/
Views: 197 Robert Doane
Finger Joint Pain Relief - Step 1
 
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At http://www.do-it-yourself-joint-pain-relief.com learn a do-it-yourself finger pain relief treatment that can be done by anyone, anytime, anywhere. Free yourself from finger joint pain in 3 Simple Steps...that you can do yourself...for Free.
Views: 122911 Gary Crowley
Finger Arthroplasty with Swanson Implants For Finger Arthritis
 
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This is another technique video on how to perform a silicone athroplasty through the volar approach. This is a tried and true procedure that has been around for decades. It preserves motion in the finger joint while eliminating the arthritis and pain. Mark Elzik, MD South Orange County Orthopaedics http://www.socortho.com
Views: 2328 Mark Elzik MD
Draining gout of the finger!!!!
 
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Incision and drainage of tophi of the finger in and out patient.
Tight Fingers & Hand after Cast (Broken Wrist) Stretches & Exercises
 
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Famous Physical Therapists Bob Schrupp & Brad Heineck demonstrate some of the critical stretches & exercises to do for your tight hand and tight fingers after being in a cast for a broken wrist. Make sure to like us on FaceBook https://www.facebook.com/Physical-Therapy-317002538489676/timeline/ Check out the Products Bob and Brad LOVE on their Amazon Channel: https://www.amazon.com/shop/physicaltherapyvideo Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/PtFamous Our book “Three Simple Steps To Treat Back Pain” is available on Kindle http://www.amazon.com/Three-Simple-Steps-Treat-Back-ebook/dp/B00BPU4O5G/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1444092626&sr=8-1&keywords=3+simple+steps+to+treat+back+pain
Views: 52888 physicaltherapyvideo
ROM Therapy Strategies for Fingers
 
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Therapy strategies for range of motion (ROM) of fingers after injury. Passive range of motion and active assistive range of motion for stiff fingers. Stretching soft tissues.
Views: 134883 RMCrayne
Boutonniere Deformity - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Educational video describing the Boutonniere deformity of the fingers. Also describing conditions of Swan Neck and Mallet finger deformities. Deformity is characterize by PIP flexion and DIP extension. Injury to the extensor tendon or central slip usually prevents the finger from active extension. Anatomy What are the differences between Boutonneire and other deformities of the finger? Mallet finger Rupture or avulsion of the terminal extensor tendon. Treatment: •Immobilization of the DIP joint in extension. Keep the PIP joint free. •Surgery by pinning if subluxation of the joint or avulsion fragment is more than 50%. Swan neck Deformity and casues •Mallet (DIP) •Volar plate laxity or injury (PIP) •Subluxation (MP) Boutonniere Extenrsor tendon injury. Three components: 1-Central slip rupture 2-Traingular ligament attenuation 3-Lateral band volar migration Stages to Boutonniere: 1-Injury to the central slip will lead to lack of extension of the PIP 2-Triangular ligament, lateral band separation and volar migration will casue flexion force on the PIP and extension force on the DIP 3-Retinacular ligaments contracture 4-PIP and DIP capsular contracture Clinical examination •The extensor tendon of the finger splits into the lateral bands. •The lateral band then come together and insert into the base of the distal phalanx. •The central slip insets into the base of the middle phalanx. If the central slip becomes ruptured, the lateral bands will slip down to the volar position. Elson’s test •Used to determine possible tear of the central slip before the deformity is evident. •Patient is asked to curl the affected finger around the edge of a table (the PIP is bent 90 degrees over the edge of the table). •The examiner then places their finger over the middle phalanx. •The patient is then asked to extend the finger. •If the central slip is intact, the examiner will be able to feel the tension of the finger being extended. •With a ruptured central slip, the examiner will not feel tension, as the patient will be unable to extend the PIP joint. Treatment Acute Boutonneire •Static splint of PIP for 6 weeks •Used for acute injuries less than 4 weeks •DIP and MP joints should remain free. Acute open repair of boutonniere: open injury requires surgical repair Chronic boutonniere: more than 2 months after injury Reconstruction of the extensor mechanism. Use splint before surgical release. Full passive range of motion of the PIP and DIP is needed before surgery. Bad prognosis if: •Patient is more than 45 years of age •Associated fracture •Fixed PIP contracture •Prior surgery Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC
Views: 122235 nabil ebraheim
Hand & Wrist Stretches for Arthritis Pain Relief - Ask Doctor Jo
 
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Hand & Wrist Stretches for Arthritis Pain Relief http://www.AskDoctorJo.com These hand and wrist stretches can help with arthritis pain relief or hand pain in general. Read Doctor Jo’s blog post about this video at http://www.askdoctorjo.com/content/hand-stretches-arthritis Related Videos: De Quervain's Syndrome Stretches, aka Blackberry Thumb: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7jeEZUGqDNw Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Stretches & Exercises: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1KRtQppsUHc =========================================== Click Below to SUBSCRIBE for More Videos: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=askdoctorjo ======================================= Doctor Jo is a licensed Physical Therapist and Doctor of Physical Therapy. http://www.AskDoctorJo.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/AskDoctorJo Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/AskDoctorJo ======================================= More Details About This Video: People often overlook stretching their hands, but they are just as important as the rest of your body. When your hands and fingers get stiff and painful, it can prevent you from doing simple everyday activities. Many times people will get a "trigger finger" which is a snapping of the tendon in your finger. The first stretches will be to loosen up your wrist. Make a fist, and at your wrist, bend your hand up and down into flexion and extension. Then you can go side-to-side into radial and ulnar deviation. You can open your fist and straighten your hands for an increased stretch. If that doesn't feel like enough stretch, you can give yourself some overpressure by using your other hand and push in the directions you are stretching. Now you are going to work you finger joints from the closest ones, or proximal interphalangeal joints (PIP), to the furthest away, distal interphalangeal joints (DIP). Gently bend at each joint group, and hold the area closest to you in place so movement is only at the desired joint. Lastly, you can get your thumb involved. Touch each finger to your thumb and work your way to each finger and back. Hand & Wrist Stretches for Arthritis Pain Relief: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NuqoG0PALHs DISCLAIMER: This video and any related comments are not medical advice. Doctor Jo is a licensed Physical Therapist and Doctor of Physical Therapy; however, she is not YOUR Physical Therapist and can't possibly diagnose you through the Internet. So don't use this information to avoid going to your own healthcare professional or to replace the advice they have given you. This information should not be used to self-diagnose or self-treat any medical condition. If you are not properly diagnosed, this information won't help, and it could make things worse. If you experience any pain, stop immediately and see your healthcare professional.
Views: 27734 AskDoctorJo
Hand Surgery Procedure - Ganglion Cyst In Finger
 
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Actual ganglion cyst surgery video, performed by Dr. Vangelisti, MD, member of the Board of Directors of North Bend Medical Center and specialist in the diagnosis and management of hand surgery. In this video, Dr. Vangelisti performs surgery on a ganglion cyst located at the tip of the finger, sometimes also called a mucous cyst. Dr. Vangelisti, MD, offers patients suffering pain from ganglion cysts the option for surgical treatment. During ganglion cyst (or mucous cyst) surgery, the surgeon will make an incision below the cyst, and remove the cyst along with a portion of the joint capsule or tendon sheath, that is part of the ganglion root. Find out more: Dr. Vangelisiti: http://drvangelisti.com
Views: 4840 Dr. Vangelisti MD
Mucoid Cyst Surgery
 
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http://www.handandwristinstitute.com/digital-mucoid-cysts/ - When ganglion cysts occur at the tip of the finger or in the nail bed, they are referred to as mucoid cysts. Unless they are close enough to the nail to cause deformity, they generally appear as a small, simple bump on the finger. Appearance of these cysts is generally associated with occurrences of arthritis in finger joints, but most often it is the cyst that causes pain, and not the underlying arthritis. Cysts most often occur on joints where bone spurs appear, which lead to the formation of the cysts in the first place. Arthritis and bone spurs are best diagnosed using x-rays, but it is also possible that MRI imaging may be necessary to get a better look at the cyst itself. People often treat cysts by aspirating them, but this very seldom leads to resolution of symptoms, and the cyst can often grow back in a very short time, so that surgery is the preferred method of resolution. In almost all cases, surgical treatment involving the complete physical removal of the cyst and related parts, as well as bone spurs, will lead to the complete resolution of symptoms. Extensor tendons are delicate and must be carefully avoided during surgery, otherwise mobility and use of the hand may be affected. It is also important that the surgery be undertaken prior to any outward eruption of the cyst through the skin to avoid infection. Once surgery is completed, therapy should be initiated as soon as possible. After about ten days, the external sutures holding the wound together will be removed, and the overall recovery time should be about four weeks. Recurrences of this type of cysts, post-surgically, occure in less less than 5% of cases.
Views: 26451 John Knight
Distal Interphalangeal Joint Fusion Surgery with the Shark Screw® Allograft
 
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Distal Interphalangeal (DIP) Joint Fusion Surgery with the Shark Screw® Allograft This video demonstrates how arthrodesis is performed on the DIP (Distal Interphalangeal) Joint. The surgery is performed by Dr. Klaus Pastl using the Shark Screw® allograft. Shark Screw® is the worlds first fully functioning allogeneic bone screw. Due to its materalistic properties, Shark Screw® is accepted by the patients body and offeres more surface area for the bones to heal and cells to attach. It enables the fusion of bones without the need of metal implants and eliminates the need for a second metal removal surgery. More videos about Shark Screw® and surgebright: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7M5rmwDOC1E4dR8XuVpfpg Get in contact with us: Website: https://www.surgebright.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brighterwaysforsurgery/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/surgebright
Views: 245 surgebright
Trigger Finger
 
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Dr. Kerrigan describes what it is like to live with trigger finger, and the risks and benefits of non-surgical treatment options versus surgery. For more information about the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Hand Clinic, please visit us at http://www.dhmc.org/goto/handclinic
Views: 407045 Dartmouth-Hitchcock
Common Conditions Of The Thumb - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Educational video describing injury conditions of the thumb.. Many different conditions can affect the normal function of the thumb. It is important to recognize the most common conditions with appropriate treatment can be given. 1-Stenosing tenosynovitis (trigger thumb). One of the most common abnormalities of the hand associated with painful triggering or locking of the thumb. When the patient tries to straighten the thumb, the nodule jams beneath the pulley proximally. 2-Extensor pollicis longus tendon The EPL tendon is responsible for the thumb’s distal interphalangeal joint. When a rupture occurs, the patient will experience loss of thumb extension and this typically occurs due to fracture of the distal radius. 3-Entrapment of the posterior interosseous branch of the radial nerve The posterior interosseous nerve is a continuation from the radial nerve and runs through the forearm. The nerve passes through the supinator muscle of the forearm, found on the outside of the elbow. The nerve becomes entrapped at the proximal edge of the supinator. Injury of the nerve may also be associated with fractures or dislocations of the radial head or the elbow joint. The patient will be able to perform wrist extension, but no finger extension. Patient with a proximal radial nerve injury will lose wrist extension and finger extension including the thumb. 4-Unable to do OK sign The anterior interosseous nerve branches from the median nerve just below the elbow and supplies the deep muscles on the front of the forearm. Typically there will be weakness of the long flexor muscle of the thumb (flexor pollicis longus) and the deep flexor muscles of the index and middle fingers. 5-Injury to the ulnar nerve (Froment’s sign) Cubital tunnel syndrome occurs due to compression of the ulnar nerve at the elbow. As a result of cubital tunnel syndrome, the patient is unable to cross or abduct the fingers. When pinching a piece of paper between the thumb and index finger, the thumb IP joint will flex if the adductor pollicis muscle is weak. 6-Rheumatoid arthritis of the thumb Inflammation or irritation causing pain, swelling, weakness and over time, loss of the normal shape and alignment of the joint. This deformity can lead to the loss of the ability to grip, grasp and pinch. Please go to the following link and support the artist Johnny Widmer in his art contest - click LIKE https://www.facebook.com/marlinmag/photos/a.10153261748858040.1073741838.134227843039/10153261754338040/?type=3&theater Thank you! https://www.facebook.com/JohnnyWidmerArt?fref=ts http://www.johnnywidmer.com/
Views: 575223 nabil ebraheim
Hand and Finger Exercises (Range of Motion): Physical Therapy
 
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Physical Therapist Bob Schrupp demonstrates a comprehensive six exercises for the hand and fingers. Range of motion for arthritis, for rehab, or after surgery.
Views: 192545 BobSchrupp
Finger injury in climbers (Synovitis, joint problems)
 
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In this video we discuss a very common finger injury amongst climbers, Synovitis. It is a temporary inflammation of the synovial membrane and can cause discomfort, swelling and reduced mobility. If you think you may have synovitis the best advice currently is plenty of rest, and remember to consult your doctor if things do not improve. Disclaimer - http://www.obsessionclimbing.com/disclaimer
Views: 29727 Obsession Climbing
Rheumatoid Hand Surgery by Dr. Thomas Trumble
 
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Severe rheumatoid disease causes arthritic and deformed hands which can limit function and cause pain. In this video, arthrodesis, or joint fusion, is combined with joint replacement to relieve pain, improve function including a stable pinch, and improve range of motion. This involves replacing metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints along with fusing joints, typically in the index finger, which sustain the greatest forces.
Views: 26623 Dr. Thomas Trumble, MD
BASAL JOINT ARTHRITIS SURGERY - BEFORE SURGERY DAY
 
07:26
Did you find out you have basal joint arthritis in your hand? I finally had x-rays taken of my hands and was surprised to find out I had arthritis in 2 joints I had never heard of! If it is left to get worse, the joint can eventually collapse. Yikes! So I decided to schedule surgery for the worst-off hand, which is my non-dominant left hand. Since I already have a YouTube channel, I decide to "vlog" it. This first video is a before-the-surgery video. I filmed & edited it more than one week before the scheduled surgery. All of the videos about my experience will be on one Playlist on my channel which I'll call "Basal Joint Arthritis Surgery Journey". Only through the process will I discover whether I turn out to be a best-case-scenario, worst-case-scenario, or somewhere in between! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Please like/click the “Thumbs up” button and write a comment. I’d like to know what you think, your suggestions for products, what you’ve tried, etc. And please Subscribe to be notified when I upload a new video! Subscribe at this link: https://www.youtube.com/user/HowToDoStuffWatchHre ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Products shown or mentioned: Comfort Cool Thumb CMC Restriction Splint: http://bit.ly/2whvree Earrings: Kohl's Dana Buchmann Interlocking Circle Drop Earrings*: http://bit.ly/2i8wyaZ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Get Cash Back when you shop at over 2,000 stores online! Nearly every place you purchase from online participates in Ebates. You’ll also get a cash bonus award after your first purchase. Click the link below to get started with Ebates.com: https://www.ebates.com/r/GLORYB112?eeid=28187 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Check out the other videos in this series/Playlist: Basal Joint Arthritis - After Surgery on Surgery Day: https://youtu.be/wI7T0c9Kab0 First Week After Basal Joint Arthritis Surgery: https://youtu.be/cA3l1InVtsA Got the Cast on - 11 Days After Basal Joint Arthritis Surgery: https://youtu.be/pCr08jHQABs How I'm Doing with the Cast Following Basal Joint Arthritis Surgery: https://youtu.be/nlvnV7kfQZM The Removeable Splint & OT Following Basal Joint Arthritis Surgery: https://youtu.be/qav_uCFi8h4 The ENTIRE PLAYLIST for the BASAL JOINT ARTHRITIS SURGERY: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLkJymLpJ5mYUpWiBbDO40SdPrvodzw70s ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Music: YouTube! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Camera – Canon EOS Rebel T6i w/EF-S 18-55 mm Lens*: http://bit.ly/1OAyBO1 Vanguard VEO Aluminum Tripod with Pan Head*: http://bit.ly/1nctWIT Lights - Craphy 5500k Photography Continuous Softbox Lighting*: http://bit.ly/2pt9DtA IK Multimedia iRig HD Microphone*: http://bit.ly/1oNQ51D Pop Filter with flat mount*: http://bit.ly/20hVT0p Scissor Arm Microphone Suspension Boom*: http://bit.ly/1RCjjMs Techsmith - Camtasia Editing Software*: http://bit.ly/1TJiYsf ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Twitter: http://twitter.com/GloryB_TV Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lifestyle.howtodostuff/ Blog: http://www.howtodostufflearnhere.com/ Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1AcBLBx Email: HowToDoStuff.WatchHere@gmail.com *SOME links provided above are affiliate links
Views: 5029 GloryB-TV
Cortisone Injection
 
02:04
Animation intended to instruct PA students how to properly administer a cortisone injection into the metacarpophalangeal indicis joint.
Views: 11508 Brandon Holt
How To Prevent And Treat Osteoarthritis In The Hands And Joint Pain!
 
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How To Prevent And Treat Osteoarthritis In The Hands And Joint Pain! Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SUxKlAVpt5s Please subscribe our channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/livehealthylifeofficial Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Live-Healthy-Life-1645151002425115 Follow us on Twitter : https://twitter.com/livehealthylif1 Follow us on Google+ : https://plus.google.com/+LiveHealthyLifeofficial How To Prevent And Treat Osteoarthritis In The Hands Arthritis Is A Common Condition. It Has Wide-Ranging Effects On Multiple Areas Of The Body And Can Involve Any Major Joint. It Usually Affects The Larger Joints Of The Extremities, Such As The Wrists, Fingers, Knees, Hips And Ankles. Arthritis In Your Hands Affects Your Wrists And Joints In Your Fingers. You May Notice: Swelling, Pain, Stiffness And Limited Range Of Motion. You May Experience These Symptoms Regularly, Or It May Be Days Or Even Weeks Before You Have An Outbreak. Over Time, You May Experience Chronic Pain And Performing Simple Activities Can Be Difficult. Fortunately, There Are Many Natural Ways To Prevent And Treat Osteoarthritis In The Hands. Hand Exercises Doing Hand Exercises Is Imperative When It Comes To Pain And Stiffness Of Osteoarthritis In The Hands. Regularly Performing Manual Exercises Can Help Keep The Ligaments And Tendons Of Support In The Hands Flexible. It Will Also Improve Blood Circulation In The Area And Help Reduce Pain. Apple Cider Vinegar The Raw And Organic Apple Cider Vinegar Provides Several Trace Nutrients To The Body And Also Helps The Body Become More Alkaline. This In Turn Reduces The Pain That Occurs With Arthritis In The Hands. In Addition, It Helps Eliminate The Accumulation Of Toxins In The Joints And Connective Tissues, Which Also Plays A Key Role In Reducing Arthritic Pain. Occupational Therapy Occupational Therapy Can Strengthen The Joints In The Wrists And Fingers, Improve Manual Dexterity And Protect The Joints From Further Degeneration. For Many Patients, Occupational Therapy May Be The Most Cost-Effective Treatment Option. Turmeric Turmeric Is An Anti-Inflammatory Herb That Can Help Treat Pain And Inflammation Related To Osteoarthritis Of The Hands. Curcumin, The Active Ingredient In Turmeric, Is A Potent Antioxidant With Anti-Inflammatory Properties. Turmeric Can Be A Therapeutic Agent To Relieve Arthritis. Mix A Little Olive Oil And ½ Teaspoon Turmeric Powder To Form A Paste. Apply It Over The Affected Area And Cover It With A Bandage For A Couple Of Hours. Do It 2 Or 3 Times A Day For Several Days. Use Epsom Salts Added To The Bath Water, These Magnesium Sulfate Crystals Provide An Extra Soothing Comfort For The Pain Of Arthritis Because They Help Remove Carbon, One Of The Waste Products Of Your Body, Through Your Skin. Green Tea Green Tea Has Anti-Inflammatory And Antioxidant Properties That Help Reduce Pain And Swelling Of The Joints, Common Symptoms Of Osteoarthritis. In Addition, Green Tea Helps Maintain Bone Density And Strength. Hot Hand Baths Whether Warm Compresses Or Hand Baths With Paraffin Wax, They Can Soothe Affected Joints. By Heating The Fluid Of The Viscous Joint Contained In Each Joint Capsule, The Heat Can Help Maintain The Flexibility Of The Hand. Changes In Diet The Right Food Can Cure Different Diseases And Arthritis In The Hands Is No Exception. Several Foods Can Help Fight Pain And Inflammation. Proper Nutrition Will Also Help The Healing Or Help Delay The Progression Of The Disease. When You Suffer From Arthritis, Your Body Needs Certain Nutrients Such As Calcium, Magnesium, Vitamin C, Vitamin D And Folic Acid.
Views: 2429 Live Healthy Life
CS:  Arthritic Hand- MCP & PIP Pathology
 
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Visit http://www.sonosite.com/education for more information about SonoSite education. For a more comprehensive and portable video library, please download the SonoAccess™ iPhone® app at http://www.sonoaccess.com. This introductory video details how bedside medical ultrasound imaging of an arthritic hand allows for rapid and effective evaluation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. It discusses the anatomy of the finger, probe placement, and scanning techniques. It also includes clinical images of the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints. This video is of particular interest to rheumatologists and primary care clinicians. To receive notifications about the YouTube videos from SonoSite, click the Subscribe button to subscribe to this channel.
Views: 11602 SonoSite
KT Tape: Finger Jam
 
04:05
Finger Jam "Jammed Finger" is a term that refers to the many injuries of the ligaments and soft tissue around the small joints of the fingers. Jammed fingers are very common in ball handling sports or activities where there is a high degree of catching objects. Finger jams occur when a blunt force is applied to a joint of the finger. The force is generally directly into the tip of the finger and combined with hyperextension of the joint. Ligaments and other soft tissue surrounding the joint are stretched or torn resulting in significant pain. Swelling, bruising, and loss of motion typically accompanies the pain. KT Tape can help stabilize the joint without locking it down, allowing for comfort and promoting healing to occur more rapidly. It is important to diagnose the sprain so that fractures or dislocations can be ruled out or treated effectively. Failure to do so could result in loss of movement or chronic pain. Rest, ice, and NSAIDs can be very helpful in treating both the inflammation and the pain. If pain does not subside within the first 12 hours and a medical professional has not been consulted, see a clinician to properly diagnose the sprain and identify any fractures or dislocations. For additional resources, please visit the KT Tape website at www.kttape.com.
Views: 333500 KT Tape
The Office: Live DNA Case Study - Neckpain, Numbness and Arthritic Pain in the Fingers
 
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http://www.doane.us Welcome to Doane Online Education. A modern perspective on Chinese Medicine; concerned only with clinical efficacy. Doane Online Education is the home of DNA (Distal Needling Acupuncture) and MPD (Medical Pulse Diagnosis). We provide free and membership-only acupuncture and Chinese Medicine webinars. This is a short preview of our weekly office episodes. Get in touch with Robert Doane and DNA/ MPD practitioners: http://www.doane.us/#!blog/c13zr http://www.facebook.com/groups/Distal.Needling.Acupuncture/
Views: 158 Robert Doane
Wrist Pain,causes and treatment,Part 2 - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video is the Part 2 educational video describing conditions of the wrist which may cause pain. Radial wrist pain De Quervain’s syndrome Inflammation of the sheath or tunnel that surrounds the two tendons that control movement of the thumb. Pain and swelling over the thumb side of the wrist and difficulty gripping. Activites that may cause De Quervain’s syndrome •Twisting/wringing out wet towels •Hammering •Skiing •Lifting heavy objects •People who care for babies and young children commonly experience De Quervain’s tenosynovitis due to holding or carrying of the child. Finkelstein’s test is used to diagnose De Quervain’s tenosynovitis in patients who have wrist pain. The Finkelstein test is conducted by making a fist with the fingers closed over the thumb and the wrist is bent toward the little finger. the wrist is then pulled so that the tendons of the first dorsal compartment are stretched distally causing sharp local pain if tendon inflammation is present. Intersection syndrome The pain from intersection syndrome is felt on the top of the forearm, where two muscles that connect to the thumb cross over the underlying wrist tendons. Activities/ motions that may cause intersection syndrome include: •Overuse of the wrist and hand •Grasping •Turning •Twisting Ganglion cyst •Most commonly occurs on the back of the hand at the wrist joint. A small ganglion is usually painful. •Can arise from the capsule of the wrist joint or from the sheath of the tendons. Extensor tenosynovitis •Irritation of the tendons located in the fourth extensor compartment. Difficult to diagnose due to complex anatomy and biomechanics. Triangular fibrocartilage (TFCC) •The triangular fibrocartilage complex works as a cushion that stabilizes the wrist joint. •Injury or degeneration of the TFCC can lead to a wrist sprain or a very disabling wrist condition. Symptoms of TFCC include: •Swelling •Clicking •Snapping/cracking •Weakness Diagnosis includes •Physical examination •MRI •Wrist Arthroscopy Treatment includes •Anti-inflammatory medication •Physical therapy •Injections •Debridement or repair of complex tear. Extensor carpi ulnaris subluxation or inflammation •Snapping ECU syndrome is a condition due to extensor carpi ulnaris tendon sliding in and out of its groove. •If the ECU tendon is not held in place, it may “snap” over the bone as the wrist is rotated causing tendonitis of the ECU tendon. Distal radioulnar joint •Arthritis or trauma •May arise from various sources such as repetitive injury or previous trauma. •Degenerative arthritis is usually post-traumatic. •Inflammatory arthritis includes conditions such as rheumatoid.
Views: 266033 nabil ebraheim
Basal Joint Arthritis
 
06:40
Learn about basal joint arthritis, the variety of techniques we use to relieve symptoms, and how Dr. Kerrigan partners with her patients to pick the best treatment option. For more information about the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Hand Clinic, please visit us at http://www.dhmc.org/goto/handclinic
Views: 92748 Dartmouth-Hitchcock
Claw Hand, Ulnar Claw Hand - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Dr. Ebraheim's animated educational video describing clawing of the hand - Ulnar Claw Hand. Ulnar claw hand is an abnormal hand position that develops due to injury of the ulnar nerve. The ulnar claw hand deformity occurs more with a lower ulnar nerve lesion (below the elbow) and typically causes flexion and clawing of the 4th and 5th fingers due to the unopposed action of the medial part(ulnar part) of the flexor digitorum profundus muscle. Clawing is seen when the patient is asked to extend the fingers. A hand in ulnar claw position will have the 4th and 5th fingers extended at the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints and flexed at the interphalangeal (IP) joints. When you ask the patient to extend the fingers, the patient will not be able to extend the interphalangeal (IP) joints of the fourth and fifth fingers. Why does this happen? The ulnar nerve innervates the ulnar ½ of the flexor digitorum profundus muscles. The ulnar nerve also innervates the 3rd and 4th lumbrical muscles, all of the interosseous muscles, the adductor pollicis muscle, and the deep head of the flexor pollicis brevis. When there is an injury to the ulnar nerve at the wrist, there will be loss of function for all the interosseous muscles and the ulnar two lumbricals. The second and third digits are mainly unaffected by this injury except in adduction and abduction of the fingers, while the fourth and fifth digits are largely affected by injury to the nerve. With this dysfunction of these muscles, the extensor digitorum is unopposed, causing hyperextension of the fourth and fifth digits at the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints. The extensor digitorum is very affective in extending the MCP joint. The extensor digitorum gets help from the interossei and the lumbricals to extend the IP joints through the extensor hood or the extensor expansion. At the interphalangeal (IP) joints, the extensor digitorum has to overcome and counteract the flexion force that is exerted by the functional flexor digitorum profundus. Clearly the extensor digitorum cannot do this because there is no assistance from the lumbricals or the interossei muscles (clawing of the fingers will show up). This usually occurs from a distal ulnar nerve lesion that preserves innervation to the medial half (ulnar half) of the FDP muscles. In this distal lesion, the sensation at the dorsum of the fourth and fifth fingers will be intact because the dorsal sensory nerve may be spared if the lesion is at the wrist. There will definitely be numbness of the fourth and fifth fingers on the volar aspect. You may find wasting of the first interosseous muscle. There may also be flattening of the hypothenar eminence. The fourth and fifth fingers will be stuck in a position of hyperextension at the MCP joints and flexion at the IP joints. If lesion of the ulnar nerve is high and the flexor digitorum profundus is not working, then there will be no clawing of the fingers. Definitely in a high ulnar nerve lesion, there will be a loss of sensation in the dorsal aspect of the fourth and fifth fingers. Differential Diagnosis: •Volkmann’s Ischemic Contracture •Dupuytren’s Contracture •Spastic Hand •Congenital Flexion Contracture (camptodactyly) These two conditions may appear similar however they are not the same! Claw hand occurs due to an ulnar nerve injury, usually a distal lesion. This is how the position of the hand appears. The fourth and fifth digits are flexed and the patient cannot straighten these two fingers. Sign of Benediction The sign of benediction usually occurs due to a median nerve injury, usually a high median nerve injury or anterior interosseous nerve lesion. The sign of benediction is the position of the hand that occurs when you ask the patient to make a fist and the second and third fingers will remain extended. When you ask the patient to extend the fingers, they will be able to extend them. They cannot flex the second and third digits and also cannot do the ok sign. This is a median nerve or anterior interosseous nerve injury. Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC Donate to the University of Toledo Foundation Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Endowed Chair Fund: https://www.utfoundation.org/foundation/home/Give_Online.aspx?sig=29
Views: 66254 nabil ebraheim
Hand Pain ,Fingers pain - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes possible conditions that may cause pain within the hand and fingers. Hand pain Common hand problems Carpal tunnel syndrome •Pressure on the median nerve causing pain over the wrist and fingers. •Compression of the median nerve at the wrist. •Can lead to numbness, tingling or weakness in the hand and fingers. •These symptoms are found in the thumb, index, middle and half of the ring fingers. •Can lead to atrophy of the hand and finger muscles. Cubital tunnel syndrome •Pain at the small finger and half of the ring finger. •Pain originates at the medial elbow. •Increased pressure on the ulnar nerve at the elbow where the nerve passes under the medial epicondyle or “funny bone”. •The connective tissue over the nerve will sometimes thicken, causing the patient to have numbness and tingling in the little finger and ulnar half of the ring finger. •Ulnar nerve compression below the elbow that can cause a “claw hand”. Osteoarthritis •Pain typically affecting the interphalangeal joints of the fingers and thumb. •Degenerative joint disease causing gradual deterioration of the cartilage forming the joints of the hand. Rheumatoid arthritis •Pain located at the knuckles of the fingers and the wrist bone on the side of the small finger. •Inflammation or irritation causing pain, swelling, weakness and over time loss of the normal shape and alignment of joints. •The joints between the hand and fingers well and move upward ( dorsal subluxation) •Tendons over the joints slip and cause the fingers to bend towards the little finger (ulnar drift). Flexor tendonitis (trigger finger) •Pain may be located in the palm at the base of the finger. •Condition that affects the tendons of the fingers causing the finger to remain in the bent position when attempting to straighten it. •The flexor tendon becomes thick and irritated as it slides through the tendon pulley causing a thickened nodule and triggering of the tendon. De Quervain’s syndrome •Pain is located over the radial side of the wrist. •Pain and swelling over the thumb side of the wrist that may cause difficulty in gripping with the thumb. •Inflammation of the sheath or tunnel that surrounds the two tendons that control movement of the thumb. Basal thumb joint arthritis •Pain is located at the base of the thumb (CMC joint). •Arthritis of the basal joint or thumb CMC (carpometacarpal joint). •Basal joint arthritis results in pain with restricted movement of the thumb across the palm. It is hard to differentiate between De Quervain’s syndrome and basal thumb joint arthritis. Finklestein’s test ( De Quervain’s) and Grind test (basal thumb arthritis). Finklestein’s test •The test is conducted by having the patient make a fist with the fingers closed over the thumb and the wrist is bent towards the little finger. •The hand is pulled so that the involved tendons are stretched, causing sharp, local pain if injury and inflammation is present. Grind test •By axial loading, pushing and rotating the thumb metacarpal bone, grinding may be felt within the joint. Flexor tenosynovitis (kanavel’s sign) •Pain is located in the finger at the flexor tendon sheath. Cardinal signs 1-Uniform swelling of the entire finger 2-The finger is flexed 3-Intense pain when attempting to straighten the finger. occurs early 4-Tenderness along the course of the tendon sheath.
Views: 526024 nabil ebraheim
Finger joint replacement surgery
 
04:23
Learn more at www.circlehealth.co.uk/treatments/finger-joint-replacement-surgery
Views: 2241 Circle Health
Examination Of The Hand, Tests - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes examination test of the hand. Adequate evaluation of the hand is necessary for the management of hand and wrist conditions or injury. Knowledge of certain specific tests will help the clinician to reach the correct diagnosis and provide adequate treatment. These are some of the most useful tests that are used frequently for evaluation of wrist and hand conditions. De Quervain's syndrome: inflammation of the sheath or tunnel that surrounds the two tendons that control movement of the thumb. Finklestein’s test: the patient makes a fist with the fingers closed over the thumb and the wrist is bent towards the little finger. The hand is pulled so that the involved tendon is stretched, causing a sharp, local pain if injury and inflammation are present. What is carpal tunnel syndrome? Pressure placed on the median nerve due to thickening of the transverse carpal ligament. Can lead to numbness, tingling or weakness of the hand and fingers. Tinel’s test: the tinel’s test is used to determine symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. The test is considered positive if symptoms of tingling worsen while tapping on the median nerve at the wrist. •Pahlen’s test: the Phalen’s maneuver is a diagnostic test performed to determine if the patient has CTS. The back of the hands are pressed together, compressing the nerve, which may cause symptoms of CTS. •Froment’s test: the Froment's test is used to test for palsy of the ulnar nerve which may occur with entrapment of the ulnar nerve within the cutibal tunnel. What is cubital tunnel syndrome? Occurs due to compression of the ulnar nerve at the elbow. Froment’s test: when pinching a piece of paper between the thumb and index finger, the thumb IP joint will flex if the adductor pollicis muscle is weak due to ulnar nerve palsy. •The OK sign is used to check for paralysis of the anterior interosseous nerve due to entrapment or compression injury. This nerve is a branch of the median nerve that innervates the muscles of the deep group of the anterior compartment of the forearm. Patients with paralysis of the anterior interosseous nerve will unable to make the OK sign. •Wrist drop: condition of the hand and wrist that determines the presence of radial nerve injury. •The Allen's test: The examiner applies pressure with the thumbs occluding the ulnar and radial arteries. Patient is asked to make a fist. Patient is then asked to open the hand. When the examiner releases the ulnar artery, the patient;s ulnar artery will cause blood flow to the hand. What is basal thumb arthritis? Arthritis affecting the thumb joint . Grind test: by axial loading, pushing and rotating the thumb metacarpal bone, grinding may be felt within the joint. •Watson’s test: also called the scaphoid shift test, it is diagnostic test used to evaluate scaphoid stability. The examiner places a thumb over the patient’s scaphoid tuberosity which is the distal pole of the scaphoid on the volar surface. The other fingers of the examiner’s same hand are placed dorsally above the radius. The patient’s wrist is placed initially into an ulnar deviation and the examiner's other hand deviates the wrist radially and flexes it slightly. With pressure on the tuberosity of the scaphoid, the scaphoid is pushed dorsally out of the radial fossa. If there is instability of the scaphoid, the test will be positive and produce pain and a “clunk”. •Lumbrical plus finger: caused by laceration of the flexor digitorum profundus distal to the origin of the lumbricals. Lumbrical is tighter than FDP. Most common in the middle finger. With injury of the flexor digitorum profundus tendon, the patient is unable to maintain the grip when the examiner releases the finger. •Testing the integrity of the flexor tendon: keep the PIP of the finger extended and see if the patient can flex the DIP. Keep the other fingers extended and then see if the patient can flex the PIP joint of the involved finger. When multiple slips of the superficialis tendon are cut, identify the tendon properly. The superficial tendon of the long and ring fingers are volar at the wrist. •Bunnell test •Elson’s test: used to determine if the patient has a central slip tear before the deformity is present. •When holding a relaxed cascade, the fingers should normally point towards the region of the scaphoid. Malrotation of the finger will causes the affected finger to deviate from its normal rotational direction. Malrotation is especially important with finger metacarpal fractures. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC
Views: 414458 nabil ebraheim
KT Tape: Thumb
 
05:48
Thumb pain usually presents as pain at the base of the thumb and wrist. A notable thumb pain condition includes De Quervain Syndrome, also known by many other names such as gamer's thumb, mother's wrist, and mommy thumb. This condition in particular is a degenerative (microscopic injury) condition of the sheath (extensor retinaculum) that surrounds the tendons passing over the thumb side of the wrist. These tendons control the motions of the thumb, most specifically the movement of thumb towards the wrist. When this sheath becomes injured or inflamed, the tendons become entrapped and cause pain during movement of the thumb. Thickening of the tendons from overuse or trauma will also cause problems when the tendons need to slide beneath the sheath. Women are considered at higher risk due to the sharper angles of the bones in the wrist, but the actual cause is somewhat unknown. Many believe overuse is the primary cause leading to inflammation. This hypothesis is backed up by noting that most patients with this pain are new mothers who repeatedly lift their growing babies. Symptoms are most often noted in both wrists and to the same degree of pain, indicating that more overuse activity causes more inflammation leading to pain. When these conditions are present, movement of the thumb is restrained and further perpetuates the inflammatory condition and may create swelling in more severe cases. Pain is noted during thumb and wrist motion along with thickening and hardening of the area at the base of the thumb. Difficulty gripping, tenderness at the base of the thumb, and swelling are common symptoms. Pain is usually slight to moderate, and extreme pain may be an indication of a more serious condition. Treatment of the pain is determined more by noting what has worked in the past rather than scientific data. KT Tape has been shown to provide support during motion of the thumb and wrist, and has markedly reduced pain in many subjects. KT Tape also increases circulation to reduce inflammation and speed the healing process. Corticosteroid injections are thought to be successful, but do need to be weighed against the negative side-effects of increased degenerative effects. Surgery has been well accepted and successful in almost all cases, but conservative therapies are highly preferred prior to making this leap. Ice after activity, rest, and avoidance of activities that incite pain are all important steps to avoid surgery. A focus on proper lifting mechanics will also help to avoid these symptoms in the future. For more resources, please visit the KT Tape website at www.kttape.com.
Views: 674419 KT Tape
Top 3 Elbow Straightening Exercises & Stretches (Do It Yourself)
 
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Famous Physical Therapists Bob Schrupp and Brad Heineck present the top 3 exercises for straightening the elbow after surgery or injury. These are stretches and exercises you can do yourself. Make sure to like us on FaceBook https://www.facebook.com/Physical-Therapy-317002538489676/timeline/ Check out the Products Bob and Brad LOVE on their Amazon Channel: https://www.amazon.com/shop/physicaltherapyvideo Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/PtFamous Our book “Three Simple Steps To Treat Back Pain” is available on Kindle http://www.amazon.com/Three-Simple-Steps-Treat-Back-ebook/dp/B00BPU4O5G/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1444092626&sr=8-1&keywords=3+simple+steps+to+treat+back+pain
Views: 141006 physicaltherapyvideo
Does Cracking Your Knuckles Cause Arthritis?
 
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→Subscribe for new videos every day! https://www.youtube.com/user/TodayIFoundOut?sub_confirmation=1 →How "Dick" came to be short for 'Richard': https://youtu.be/BH1NAwwKtcg?list=PLR0XuDegDqP2Acy6g9Ta7hzC0Rr3RDS6q Never run out of things to say at the water cooler with TodayIFoundOut! Brand new videos 7 days a week! More from TodayIFoundOut Green Coca-Cola... and 5 other everyday myths https://youtu.be/EmUo-TEP2FU?list=PLR0XuDegDqP1IHZBUZvKkPwkTr6Gr0OBO The Coming Banana Apocalypse https://youtu.be/pCpmtI6oDLM?list=PLR0XuDegDqP01NqW8KRpOy-_y2m6S2VEF In this video: Have you ever cracked your knuckles and had someone yell at you to stop because it causes arthritis? 25-54% of the world’s population cracks their knuckles, men more so than women. Does this mean up to 54% of us will get arthritis? The short answer is no. There are different types of arthritis and no study has ever shown a link between cracking your knuckles and it causing any type of arthritis. Let’s talk about why and what is actually causing the “cracking” noise when you crack you’re knuckles. Want the text version?: http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/03/cracking-your-knuckles-does-not-cause-arthritis/ Sources: http://osteoarthritis.about.com/gi/o.htm?zi=1/XJ&zTi=1&sdn=osteoarthritis&cdn=health&tm=81328&f=20&su=p284.13.342.ip_&tt=12&bt=0&bts=0&zu=http%3A//www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi%3Fartid%3D1004074 http://www.hopkinsarthritis.org/arthritis-news/knuckle-cracking-q-a-from/ http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20120917-is-it-bad-to-crack-your-knuckles http://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/mysteries/joint.html http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002223/ http://www.cdc.gov/arthritis/basics/types.htm http://cal.vet.upenn.edu/projects/saortho/chapter_86/86mast.htm
Views: 71956 Today I Found Out
Finger Pain From Playing Guitar - Keeping Your Hands Healthy
 
09:05
A few weeks ago I started experiencing a lot of pain in my finger joints, and a little in my wrists from playing guitar ...All on my fretting hand. I started researching what I could do to fix this, and this video is some of what I've learned. I'm now feeling much better, and I'm still practicing with the same intensity. I hope some of this stuff helps you. Better to do all of this stuff though BEFORE you start experiencing pain, lol. http://Facebook.com/DavidDiMuzio (LIKE) http://Twitter.com/DavidDiMuzio Tweet: @daviddimuzio (FOLLOW) http://DavidDiMuzio.com (SONG DOWNLOADS) Instagram: @DavidDiMuzio (FOLLOW)
Views: 35806 daviddimuziolessons
What Is A Heberdens Node?
 
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Similar lumps are called bouchard's nodes when 19 may 201524 oct 2015 Heberden's node wikipedia. Recently, an orthopaedic surgeon told me the joints were almost 100 percent 25 may 2016 heberden's nodes are small, pea sized areas of exostosis or bony outgrowths that seen in closest to tip fingers, and 15 2011 correct answer is b osteoarthritis. What are heberden's nodes? Symptoms and significance verywell. What to do for early, mild osteoarthritis of the hands medicinenet. Heberden's and bouchard's nodes. How can i get rid of heberden's nodes? Medicinenet. May 2017 heberden's nodes. Googleusercontent search. The top joint in the fingers have a lumpy look what it may mean nodules on closest to fingertip, known as heberden's nodes, or middle joint, bouchard's are characteristic of complete information about including contributing risk factors; Recommendations nodes pinky finger my right hand become painful. Heberden nodes (hard or bony swellings in the distal interphalangeal joints) along with a deviated lumps nodules you refer, called heberden's nodes, occur on knuckle closest to end of fingers. Sometimes, surgical removal is 16 mar 2016 find out what to do for mild osteoarthritis of the hands, from over counter food supplements and home remedies pain medications photograph a left hand showing heberden's bouchard's nodes at usual dorsomedial dorsolateral sites on proximal distal interphalangeal 24 aug 2010 [color indigo 72a9d329c3]i just found today doctor that i have. What's new in arthritis treatment? Cleveland clinic. Annals of the rheumatic heberden's nodes, osteoarthrities and prednisolone. They can be easily identified, bony bumps on the finger joint closest to fingernail are called heberden's nodes. Heberden's nodes chronic arthritic disease can impact oral health photo quiz painless nodules in the fingers american family heberden's why are my knuckles knobby? Drosteoarthritis of fingers, everything you and bouchard's youtube. These bony growths generally occur on the finger joints nearest fingertip, also called distal interphalangeal heberden's nodes are hard or swellings that can develop in (dip) (the closest to end of fingers and toes) 11 may 2017 node as swelling forms hands osteoarthritis patients. They may be painful 9 jun 2017 heberden's nodes are bony nodules on the smallest finger joints. Bony bumps on the middle joint of finger are known as bouchard's heberden's nodes associated with osteoarthritis hand, a bony growth at closest to fingertip. Php&sa u&ved 0ahukewjxqnptoodvahvbvi8khe udzk4chawcbswaq&usg afqjcnful_upm7e2ao_lsicoch8ua5siyq" target "_blank"heberden's nodes symptoms, diagnosis and treatment. Heberden's nodes symptoms, diagnosis and treatment. Heberden's nodes signs, treatment, and more healthline health osteoarthritis heberdens url? Q webcache. Heberden's nodes signs, treatment, and more healthlineheberden's node causes, symptoms, risk factors treatment heberden's bouchard's webmd. They occur in people who have arthriti
Views: 52 Burning Question
What Is A Heberdens Node?
 
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The top joint in the fingers have a lumpy look what it may mean nodules on closest to fingertip, known as heberden's nodes, or middle joint, bouchard's are characteristic of disease include crepitus, effusion, and nodes. They may be painful 24 aug 2010 [color indigo 72a9d329c3]i just found out today from the doctor that i have heberden's nodes. How can i get rid of heberden's nodes? Medicinenet. Heberden's node wikipedia. They occur in people who have arthritis. Heberden's nodes signs, treatment, and more healthline health osteoarthritis heberdens url? Q webcache. Photo quiz painless nodules in the fingers american family osteoarthritis of fingers, heberden's nodes everything you node youtube. What are heberden's nodes? Symptoms and significance verywell. Heberden nodes (hard or bony swellings in the distal interphalangeal joints) along with a deviated 19 may 2015the lumps nodules you refer, called heberden's nodes, occur on knuckle closest to end of fingers. Heberden's nodes symptoms, diagnosis and treatment. Heberden's nodes are bony swellings that form on your hands as a result of osteoarthritis. What's new in arthritis treatment? Cleveland clinic. Recently, an orthopaedic surgeon told me the joints were almost 100 percent 15 may 2011 correct answer is b osteoarthritis. Heberden's nodes, osteoarthrities and prednisolone hand arthritis your health foundation. These bony growths generally occur on the finger joints nearest fingertip, also called distal interphalangeal heberden's nodes are hard or swellings that can develop in (dip) (the closest to end of fingers and toes) 11 may 2017 node as swelling forms hands osteoarthritis patients. What to do for early, mild osteoarthritis of the hands medicinenet. Heberden's nodes why are my knuckles knobby? Drosteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis what the differences. Sometimes, surgical removal is 16 mar 2016 find out what to do for mild osteoarthritis of the hands, from over counter food supplements and home remedies pain medications heberden's nodes are associated with hand, a bony growth at joint closest fingertip. They can be easily identified, bony bumps on the finger joint closest to fingernail are called heberden's nodes. Heberden's nodes, bony growths on the terminal interphalangeal joints of fingers (figure 1), complete information about heberden's including contributing risk factors; Recommendations bouchard'snode is very similar to node but are located in middle finger's or toes. Bony bumps on the middle joint of finger are known as bouchard's 9 jun 2017 heberden's nodes bony nodules smallest joints. Similar lumps are called bouchard's nodes when 1 feb 2012 heberden's hard or bony swellings that can develop in the distal interphalangeal joints (dip) (the closest to end of Heberden's signs, treatment, and more healthlineheberden's node causes, symptoms, risk factors treatment webmd. Heberden's nodes turner white communications. The bouchard's node is less common than the heberden's nodes in p
Views: 39 Question Bank
Finger Taping | How to Tape Your Sprained Finger
 
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Complete method of Do-It-Yourself (DIY) finger (PIP Joint) taping. This is commonly performed by the athlete so as not to require time from the coach or training staff.
Views: 510851 travisdoddsphysio
What Is Heberdens Nodes?
 
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Heberden's nodes, osteoarthrities and prednisolone. Heberden's node wikipedia. Sometimes, surgical removal is 16 mar 2016 find out what to do for mild osteoarthritis of the hands, from over counter food supplements and home remedies pain medications nodes are round boney, they appear very swollen. Heberden nodes (hard or bony swellings in the distal interphalangeal joints) along with a deviated what it may mean nodules on joint closest to fingertip, known as heberden's nodes, middle joint, bouchard's are characteristic of complete information about including contributing risk factors31 jul 2014. Heberden's nodes signs, treatment, and more healthlineheberden's bouchard's webmd. Annals of the rheumatic how can i get rid heberden's nodes? Medicinenet. Heberden's node causes, symptoms, risk factors and treatment heberden's bouchard's nodes. Heberden's nodes, bony growths on the terminal interphalangeal joints of fingers (figure 1), 24 aug 2010 [color indigo 72a9d329c3]i just found out today from doctor that i have heberden's nodes. Recently, an orthopaedic surgeon told me the joints were almost 100 percent Heberden's nodes signs, treatment, and more healthlineheberden's bouchard's webmd. Heberden's nodes are bony swellings that form on your hands as a result of osteoarthritis. Heberden's nodes arthritis information. Osteoarthritis of the fingers, heberden's nodes everything you and bouchard's youtube. Bony bumps on the middle joint of finger are known as bouchard's heberden's nodes associated with osteoarthritis hand, a bony growth at closest to fingertip. Hand arthritis and your health foundation. May 2017 heberden's nodes. They may be painful 11 2017 heberden's node nodes occur as bony swelling that forms on the hands in osteoarthritis patients. Heberden's nodes are caused directly by osteoarthritis due to the consistent trauma bones must disease include crepitus, joint effusion, and heberden's. Heberden's nodes signs, treatment, and more healthline health osteoarthritis heberdens url? Q webcache. They occur in people who have arthritis. Heberden's nodes symptoms, diagnosis and treatment. These bony growths generally occur on the finger joints nearest fingertip, also called distal interphalangeal heberden's nodes are hard or swellings that can develop in (dip) (the closest to end of fingers and toes) bumps joint fingernail. What to do for early, mild osteoarthritis of the hands medicinenet. 15 apr 2007 i think you mean heberden's nodes, although naming these things for the oldest city in the world might also seem appropriate but somewhat 25 may 2016 heberden's nodes are small, pea sized areas of exostosis or bony outgrowths that are seen in the joints closest to the tip of the fingers, and the heberden's nodes in the pinky finger of my right hand have become painful. Heberden's nodes turner white communications. What are heberden's nodes? Symptoms and significance verywell. The top joint in the fingers have a lumpy look 15 may 2011 correct answer i
Views: 80 Question Bank
Base of thumb arthritis
 
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View our Base of thumb Arthritus explanation video. You can also visit our website for more info: http://www.capehandsurgery.co.za Osteoarthritus refers to a process where cartilage is lost, exposing the subchondral bone and causing pain. This process is incompletely understood. The base of the thumb (carpo-metacarpal joint) is very commonly affected by osteoarthritis. The thumb has the ability to move in multiple planes and to pinch and oppose (touch the little finger). This is made possible by the carpo-metacarpal joint (CMC joint) and more specifically the metacarpal of the thumb articulating on the trapezium. This joint is a saddle joint and the metacarpal can circumduct (move 360 degrees) on the trapezium. Unfortunately when osteoarthritis is present in this joint, all thumb function becomes painful and especially pinching becomes very uncomfortable. It is thought that the thumb contributes 50-60% to hand function: therefore all hand function like key pinch, power pinch, grip strength and fine motoric movements become difficult when this joint is affected.