Home
Search results “Agranulocytosis clozapine risperidone ziprasidone”
Antipsychotics (neuroleptics)
 
09:52
This is a brief video on antipsychotics, also called neuroleptics, including their mechanisms, their indications, and side effects I created this presentation with Google Slides. Image were created or taken from Wikimedia Commons I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor. ADDITIONAL TAGS: Anti- psychotics (neuroleptics) First-generation antipsychotics First-gen side effects Extrapyramidal side effects Neuroleptic malignant syndrome Atypical antipsychotics By Unknown - http://www.flickr.com/photos/x-ray_delta_one/4298034735/, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=16041923 First generation (typical) antipsychotics Haloperidol and -azines High potency: haloperidol, trifluoperazine, fluphenazine Medium potency: perphenazine Low potency: chlorpromazine, thioridazine MoA: high affinity antagonist for dopamine (D2) receptor, thus increasing concentration of cAMP Indications: schizophrenia positive symptoms (and brief psychotic disorder, schizophreniform), schizoaffective, other psychoses, bipolar, delirium, Tourette, Huntington’s First-generation antipsychotics First-gen side effects Extrapyramidal side effects Neuroleptic malignant syndrome Atypical antipsychotics First generation (typical) antipsychotics: Side effects Delay cardiac conduction (prolong QTc interval), risk of torsades de pointes Anticholinergic effects → Blurred vision, constipation, dry mouth, urinary retention Worse with lower potency antipsychotics Antihistamine effect → sedation Anti alpha1 effect → orthostatic hypotension Endocrine: hyperprolactinemia → osteoporosis, amenorrhea, galactorrhea, gynecomastia, and sexual side effects Caused by D2 blockage on tuberoinfundibular pathway Extrapyramidal symptoms Neuroleptic malignant syndrome First-generation antipsychotics First-gen side effects Extrapyramidal side effects Neuroleptic malignant syndrome Atypical antipsychotics First generation (typical) antipsychotics: SEs: extrapyramidal side effects Caused by D2 blockage on nigrostriatal pathway Hours to days: acute dystonic rxn (sustained muscle contraction); tx with IM diphenhydramine or benztropine Days to weeks: akathisia (restlessness) Weeks to months: parkinsonism (tremor, cogwheel rigid, hypokinesia); tx with lower dose antipsychotic or diphenhydramine or benztropine Months to years: tardive dyskinesia (hyperkinetic movement of head, limbs, trunk → perioral movements (tongue, facial grimacing, and lip puckering) are common) Tx by switching 1st-gen→2nd-gen or 2nd-gen→clozapine First-generation antipsychotics First-gen side effects Extrapyramidal side effects Neuroleptic malignant syndrome Atypical antipsychotics First generation (typical) antipsychotics: SEs: neuroleptic malignant syndrome Idiosyncratic reaction presenting with confusion, vital sign (autonomic) instability, hyperpyrexia (high fever), rhabdomyolysis (myoglobinuria), renal failure, cardiovascular collapse Fever Encephalopathy Vitals unstable Enzyme increase Rigidity of muscles Treat with dantrolene Don’t confused with malignant hyperthermia! First-generation antipsychotics First-gen side effects Extrapyramidal side effects Neuroleptic malignant syndrome Atypical antipsychotics Atypical (2nd generation) antipsychotics Aripiprazole, -apines, -idones aripiprazole, asenapine, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, iloperidone, lurasidone, paliperidone, risperidone, ziprasidone MoA: weaker D2 antagonist and serotonin (5-HT2a) agonist Indications: schizophrenia (positive and negative symptoms) Side effects: Delay cardiac conduction (prolong QTc interval), risk of torsades de pointes Less anticholinergic and EPS effects Metabolic (weight gain, diabetes, high lipid) → -apines Agranulocytosis → clozapine (very potent) Hyperprolactinemia → risperidone First-generation antipsychotics First-gen side effects Extrapyramidal side effects Neuroleptic malignant syndrome Atypical antipsychotics
Views: 11867 MedLecturesMadeEasy
Clozapine Meaning
 
00:19
Video shows what clozapine means. An antipsychotic drug used in the treatment of schizophrenia etc.. Clozapine Meaning. How to pronounce, definition audio dictionary. How to say clozapine. Powered by MaryTTS, Wiktionary
Views: 477 ADictionary
Antipsychotics, Mood Stabilzers Anxiolytics
 
18:32
SKIP AHEAD: 1:01 – Antipsychotic Mechanism 1:58 – Antipsychotics and their Indications 3:30 – Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (Typical Antipsychotic Side Effect) 4:18 – Extrapyramidal Symptoms (Typical Antipsychotic Side Effect) 6:19 – Atypical Antipsychotics and their side effects 8:57 – Mood Stabilizers 12:58 – Anxiolytics and Benzodiazepines We will start with a quick review of some material from my previous video on psychosis. Symptoms of schizophrenia can be broken down into 2 categories, Positive and Negative Symptoms. Positive symptoms include behaviors or sensations that are not normally present. Examples include hallucinations, delusions, and catatonia. These symptoms are thought to be related to an excess of dopamine. I remember this by remembering that “doPamine has a P in it”. So P for Positive and P for Dopamine. Negative symptoms are the absence of normal behavior. Examples include a lack of initiative, diminished speech, disheveled appearance & flat affect. These symptoms are thought to be related to an excess of serotonin. As we will see antipsychotics affect dopamine and serotonin to varying levels. The indications for this class of drugs includes psychosis (mainly schizophrenia), Mania (mainly bipolar disorder), aggression and Tourette's disease. Typical Antipsychotics primarily block dopamine receptors in a non-specific manor. Therefore, these drugs work best for positive symptoms, and have little effect on negative symptoms. The non-specific mechanism of the drug also means there are lots of side effects. Some of these medications come in a slow release injectable form so they can be used in non-compliant and aggressive patients. There are a lot of high yield side effects so we will break them down one by one Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (or NMS) is a rare but potentially fatal adverse reaction of typical antipsychotics. It involves fever, altered mental status, rigidity and autonomic instability (such as tachycardia, hypertension, diaphoresis etc.). You may also see elevated myoglobin in blood or urine and elevated Creatine Kinase (CK). One of the ways I think about it is that it looks kinda sorta like Serotinin Syndrome that you can see with antidepressatns. If you see this you have to emergently stop the medication, provide supportive care and consider adding Dantrolene Extrapyramidal Symptoms (or EPS) are due to blockage of Nigrostriatal dopamine. It can present with a number of different symptoms. Akasthisia is a general sensation of restlessness Acute Dystonia is involuntary continuous muscle contractions often of the neck. Another common presentation of acute dystonia is Oculogyris Crisis when your eyes get locked looking upward and you have to lean over to see Dyskinesia (AKA Pseudoparkinsonism) presents like Parkinson’s Disease with symptoms like a pill rolling tremor, cogwheel rigidity & bradykinesia (or slow movement) Tardine Dyskinesia (or TD) is uncontrollable facial tics, grimacing & tongue movements As scary as these symptoms may look, they are generally not medical emergencies. In most cases you will continue to use the drug with perhaps a reduction in the dose or the addition of an anticholinergic mediation like Benzatropine or Diphenhydramine. Tardive Dyskinesia is the exception and requires cessation of the medication as it can be permanent. Usually you would switch a patient with TD to a 2nd gen antipsychotic. Hyperprolactinemia is a side effect due to Blockage of Tuberoinfundibular dopamine. It presents just like any other disease that increases prolactin. So you can have galactorrhea, gynecomastia, decreased libido and menstrual irregularities. The text for this video is too long and exceeds Youtube max allowed length. To read the rest please go to http://www.stomponstep1.com/antipsychotics-mood-stabilizers-anxiolytics-benzodiazepines-tardive-dyskinesia-extrapyramidal-symptoms/
Views: 36532 Stomp On Step 1
Antipsychotic Medications
 
26:31
This video is for educational purposes. Explanation of the symptoms and etiology of schizophrenia, description of the history of antipsychotic medications and explanation of current treatment options and alternatives.
Views: 9493 Paul Merritt
How To Pronounce Clozaril
 
01:01
Learn how to say Clozaril with EmmaSaying free pronunciation tutorials
Views: 36 Emma Saying
Asenapine
 
05:23
Asenapine, Sycrest) is an atypical antipsychotic developed for the treatment of schizophrenia and acute mania associated with bipolar disorder by Schering-Plough after its November 19, 2007 merger with Organon International. Development of the drug, through Phase III trials, began while Organon was still a part of Akzo Nobel. Preliminary data indicate that it has minimal anticholinergic and cardiovascular side effects, as well as minimal weight gain. Over 3000 patients have participated in clinical trials of asenapine, and the FDA approved the manufacturer's NDA in August 2009. It was chemically derived via altering the chemical structure of the tetracyclic antidepressant, mianserin. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 852 Audiopedia
How to Pronounce Risperdal Consta
 
00:19
This video shows you how to pronounce Risperdal Consta
Views: 149 Pronunciation Guide
How to Pronounce Clozaril
 
00:16
Learn how to say words in English correctly with Emma Saying free pronunciation tutorials. Over 140,000 words were already uploaded... Check them out! Visit my homepage: http://www.emmasaying.com
Views: 1513 Emma Saying