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Videos uploaded by user “NCAR & UCAR Science”
The Heart of Yellowstone: Inside the NWSC Supercomputer
 
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Get an up-close view inside one of the most complicated machines ever built by humanity. NCAR computer scientist Rich Loft is our guide to some of the vital parts within the new Yellowstone supercomputing system. Installed at the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center in Cheyenne, the IBM system includes a cluster of high-performance supercomputing processors, a massive data archiving facility, and a special system for visualizing scientific data. The system is made up of 100 racks—tall, black, refrigerator-sized cabinets. Each rack is filled with computing nodes, and each of those nodes holds computer chips made up of processors containing billions of transistors. Let Rich show you around this seldom-seen environment. Learn more about Yellowstone and the NWSC: http://nwsc.ucar.edu ©UCAR. Reuse of this video is restricted and permission must be sought from UCAR. Contact: copyright@ucar.edu
Views: 13183 NCAR & UCAR Science
Earth's Global Electric Circuit - Atmospheric Electricity
 
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We live inside Earth's "global electric circuit," sharing our atmosphere with sprites, elves, blue jets, and other electric phenomena. Scientists have been studying our planet's electrical environment for a century or so, from the charged particles at the top of the atmosphere, to electrical storms in clouds, to lightning that sometimes reaches the ground. But we haven't had a way to study all of it, as a system, until now. The Global Electric Circuit project is building a virtual representation of Earth's electric environment in one computer model. The model will allow scientists throughout the world to experiment with the system and advance our knowledge about the electricity in our atmosphere—a central component of the world we live in. The project is led by the University of Colorado, Pennsylvania State University, and the National Center for Atmospheric Research, with support from the National Science Foundation. (©UCAR. Video by Teresa Eastburn.) More about this research: http://sisko.colorado.edu/FESD
Views: 12599 NCAR & UCAR Science
Steroids, baseball, and climate change
 
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Find out more about climate change and extreme weather: http://www2.ucar.edu/atmosnews/attribution AtmosNews takes a lighthearted look at an unexpected analogy, explaining why some people call carbon dioxide (and the other greenhouse gases) the steroids of the climate system. Statistics and extreme behavior are involved, whether we're talking about baseball or Earth's atmosphere. NCAR scientist Gerald "Jerry" Meehl explains why. Thanks to meteorologist Dr. Jeff Masters, climate scientist Dr. Anthony Broccoli, and other colleagues who have introduced the "weather on steroids" analogy to the climate science community. Video by Noah Besser, produced by UCAR Communications for AtmosNews: NCAR & UCAR news. views. analysis | http://www.ucar.edu/atmosnews
Views: 78718 NCAR & UCAR Science
Ocean currents and oil spill - Google Earth version - 0.0005+ concentrations
 
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Update: February 28, 2011 - What happened to the oil? Detectable amounts never made it to the Atlantic, at least not in an easily visible form on the ocean surface. In this follow-up article we review: * the difference between a projection and an actual forecast * the challenges of making short-term projections of natural processes that can act chaotically, such as ocean currents. See: http://www2.ucar.edu/currents/what-happened-oil ------ June 17, 2010 This animation, displayed using Google Earth software, provides sharpened contrast between comparatively clear ocean and areas of higher dye concentration by eliminating dye concentrations below 0.0005 (a dilution of 2,000 times relative to the source). As a result, the area covered in beige (most diluted) is reduced compared to the animations released on June 3, 2010, with some of the lowest concentrations becoming transparent. The June 3 YouTube video is here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pE-1G_476nA . You can download a KMZ file and instructions for interactive display within Google Earth from this page: http://www2.ucar.edu/news/oil-spill-animations This animation shows one scenario of how oil released in the upper 65 feet of the ocean at the location of the Deepwater Horizon disaster on April 20 in the Gulf of Mexico could move. This is not a forecast, but rather, it illustrates a likely dispersal pathway of the oil for roughly four months following the spill. It assumes oil spilling continuously from April 20 to June 20. The colors represent a dilution factor ranging from red (most concentrated) to beige (most diluted). The simulations do not make any assumptions about the daily rate or total amount of oil spilled and the dilution factor does not attempt to estimate the actual barrels of oil at any spot. Instead, one unit per day of a liquid "dye tracer" is injected in the model at the spill site (injected continuously over the period April 20 through June 20). The animation shows possible scenarios of what might happen to dye released in the upper 65 feet of ocean at the spill site. The dilution factor depicts how dye released at the site of the spill will be progressively diluted as it is transported and mixed by ocean currents. For example, areas showing a dilution factor of 0.01 would have one-hundredth the concentration of oil present at the spill site. The animation is based on a computer model simulation, using a virtual dye, that assumes weather and current conditions similar to those that occur in a typical year. It is one of a set of six scenarios (see http://www2.ucar.edu/news/oil-spill-animations ) that simulate possible pathways the oil might take under a variety of oceanic conditions. Each of the six scenarios shows the same overall movement of oil through the Gulf to the Atlantic and up the East Coast. However, the timing and fine-scale details differ, depending on the details of the ocean currents in the Gulf. (Visualization by Michael Burek, NCAR; based on model simulations.)
Views: 46082 NCAR & UCAR Science
Esperanza Wildfire - Scientific Visualization
 
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It takes a supercomputer to run a mathematical simulation, or model, of the complex processes observed in wildfires. It often takes yet more computing power to visualize the data coming out of the computer model. This fire-behavior simulation reproduces the October 2006 Esperanza Fire near Cabazon, California. Using data from the NCAR fire-weather model, simulations like this one are helping scientists explain the physical processes and behavior within large wildfires. An arsonist ignited the blaze on the upwind edge of Cabazon Peak during a Santa Ana wind event. Driven by gusty Santa Ana winds, dry chaparral fuels, and steep terrain, the fire rapidly spread up into the San Jacinto Wilderness. The simulation reproduces several features observed during the fire: the rapid spread to the west-southwest, runs of flame up canyons that lay perpendicular to the wind direction, splitting of the fire into two heads, and feathering of the fire line at the leading edge. -----Coupled Weather-Fire Simulation of the Esperanza Wildfire----- Science: Janice Coen (NCAR) and Phillip Riggin (Pacific Southwest Research Station, USDA Forest Service) Visualization: Janice Coen and Alan Norton, NCAR, using VAPOR (Visualization and Analysis Platform for Ocean, Atmosphere, and Solar Researchers) http://www.vapor.ucar.edu More information: http://www.mmm.ucar.edu/people/coen/files/newpage_m.html
Views: 7046 NCAR & UCAR Science
Watch invisible waves rumble through the atmosphere - NCAR high-resolution computer modeling
 
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For the first time, scientists have simulated what gravity waves look like as they ripple upward through the atmosphere. Related story: https://www2.ucar.edu/atmosnews/just-published/15335/watch-invisible-waves-rumble-through-atmosphere. UPDATE: (10/23/2015) The below caption has been edited to reflect the correct elevation of the winds shown in the second half of the video. This visualization was created on the Yellowstone system at the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center using a high-resolution version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). It shows meridional (north-south) winds at two heights. Part 1 shows winds at Earth's surface, where gravity waves usually have only regional impacts. Part 2 shows winds at an elevation of 90 km (about 56 miles), where their influence can become dominant. The video simulations cover a three-day period when a hypothetical tropical cyclone was present off the east coast of Australia. ©UCAR Simulations courtesy Hanli Liu, NCAR
Views: 31456 NCAR & UCAR Science
Supercomputing - Robots Move Data Inside NCAR's AMSTAR Digital Storage Library
 
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Robots inside NCAR's AMSTAR digital storage library respond to commands to fetch and mount tape cartridges for reading and/or writing scientific data (see http://www.ucar.edu/news/releases/2008/amstar.jsp ). About halfway into the video, a robot scans the barcode labels on tapes within the library as part of the initial tape inventory process. The demand for data storage continuously grows as researchers use increasingly complex computer models to study Earth's climate by simulating the atmosphere, oceans, sea ice, and land cover. The system, designed by Sun Microsystems, gives NCAR five times its current storage capacity, enabling scientists to conduct increasingly sophisticated computer studies.
Views: 30442 NCAR & UCAR Science
Introducing Dr. Tornado - NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center
 
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Science is a special way of learning about our world. Like detectives who use clues to figure out what happened in the past, scientists also use clues, or observations, to discover how the world works. And, just like detectives, scientists have to be very careful to understand what the clues are trying to tell. Scientists use many tools to help them, including special instruments to collect information, like thermometers and satellites. They also use really powerful calculating machines called supercomputers to figure out what those observations mean. Find out how Dr. Tornado and her colleagues use the massive computers at the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center to uncover clues--not just to tornadoes, but to so many other things happening on Earth, and even on the Sun. Come visit us if you're in Cheyenne, Wyoming, and find out more about us anytime, here: http://nwsc.ucar.edu
Views: 2128 NCAR & UCAR Science
Arctic sea ice loss - climate model projections - Marika Holland, NCAR
 
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NCAR scientists Marika Holland and David Bailey used the Community Climate System Model to study the possible future impacts of climate change on sea ice in the Arctic. The visualizations of their research in this video show the percent of ocean water covered by ice, which is called the sea-ice concentration. The first visualization uses monthly data from their computer simulation, from 1979-2007. The second shows the computer model's portrayal of the state of the ice every September, from 1850-2100. (Visualization by Tim Scheitlin, NCAR) More about the Community Climate System Model: http://www2.ucar.edu/magazine/features/ccsm-cesm
Views: 10283 NCAR & UCAR Science
El Niño: 1997 vs 2015 (Updated through Dec. 3)
 
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This visualization shows sea surface temperature anomalies compared between the 1997 and 2015 El Niño events through early December. See more visualizations created by the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Vislab over at their YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/ucarvets.
Views: 9426 NCAR & UCAR Science
High temperatures beat lows - Gerald Meehl (NCAR) on Current & Future Climate
 
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Twice as many record-breaking high temperatures have been set compared to record lows across the U.S. in recent decades (see http://www.ucar.edu/news/releases/2009/maxmin.jsp ). For future climate, computer models show the ratio climbing to 20:1 by 2050 and 50:1 by 2100. Day-to-day variability means we still get record cold days, but the record highs are far exceeding the lows. Gerald "Jerry" Meehl is an NCAR senior scientist. His research includes connecting the solar cycle to subtle changes in weather and climate on Earth; examining the consequences of global warming, including heat waves, droughts, storms, and other weather extremes; regional climate change; and El Niño and other influences of the tropics on global climate.
Views: 7509 NCAR & UCAR Science
Supercomputer! NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center
 
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Welcome to the nation's newest high-performance computing facility dedicated to studying the Earth and Sun. Located on the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains in Cheyenne, the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center officially opens its doors in October 2012. Within its walls, many aspects of our planet's workings can be captured in unprecedented detail. The results could help us protect our wired society from solar storms, reduce the toll from the next disastrous hurricane or tornado outbreak, chart the critical supplies of water and energy beneath our feet, and address many other concerns. Scientists from across the nation will use the NWSC--primarily via the Internet--to study weather, climate, oceanography, air pollution, space weather, computational science, energy production, carbon sequestration, and many other features of the Earth system. Funded by the National Science Foundation with additional support from a broad public-private consortium, the NWSC has achieved LEED Gold status. LEED, or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, is an internationally recognized rating system for green buildings developed by the U.S. Green Building Council for evaluating environmentally sustainable construction. Learn more about the center's energy efficiency here: http://www2.ucar.edu/atmosnews/features/4490/efficient-design The NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center is operated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. NCAR is managed by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. More about the NWSC: http://nwsc.ucar.edu ©UCAR. Reuse of this video is restricted and permission must be sought from UCAR. Contact: copyright@ucar.edu
Views: 66755 NCAR & UCAR Science
NCAR Supercomputers at Work - Inside Bluefire
 
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NCAR is home to the first IBM Power 575 supercomputer to be shipped anywhere in the world. Named bluefire (http://bit.ly/l9E0X) on arrival in 2008, the system is over three times more powerful and three times more energy efficient than the supercomputers it replaced. It is also over a million times more powerful than the first recognized supercomputer, the Cray 1-A, which NCAR deployed from 1977-1986. Bluefire consists of 11 cabinets weighing 3,200 pounds each. NCAR is a world leader in supercomputing for the atmospheric and geosciences, providing services to hundreds of UCAR member universities and affiliates in the U.S. and worldwide through its Computational & Information Systems Laboratory (CISL). Learn more at http://www.cisl.ucar.edu .
Views: 10278 NCAR & UCAR Science
Sunrise Telescope - Balloon Launch June 2009
 
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Successful launch of the Sunrise solar telescope by high-altitude balloon from Kiruna, Sweden on June 8, 2009. Sunrise is an international collaboration to view the Sun in unprecedented detail for scientific research. More about Sunrise: http://www.ucar.edu/news/releases/2007/sunrise.shtml and http://www.ucar.edu/communications/staffnotes/news/sunrise.php (©UCAR, video by Carlye Calvin.)
Views: 7883 NCAR & UCAR Science
Welcome to NCAR - The National Center for Atmospheric Research
 
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Take a quick tour of the National Center for Atmospheric Research with NCAR Director Jim Hurrell. NCAR is a scientific laboratory providing research, observing and computing facilities, and a variety of services for the atmospheric and related Earth sciences community. Visit us online at http://ncar.ucar.edu NCAR's Visitor Center is open to the public 363 days a year, offering free exhibits about weather and climate, guided and self-guided tours, work by local artists, an accessible weather trail, and more. Learn more at http://scied.ucar.edu/visit
Views: 3174 NCAR & UCAR Science
Learning about future climate from Earth's deep past - Jeffrey Kiehl  (NCAR)
 
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Related news: http://www2.ucar.edu/news/3628/earth-s-hot-past-could-be-prologue-future-climate The magnitude of climate change during Earth's deep past suggests that future temperatures may eventually rise far more than projected if society continues its pace of emitting greenhouse gases. NCAR scientist Jeffrey Kiehl says that carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere may reach levels that last existed about 30 million to 100 million years ago, when global temperatures averaged about 29 degrees Fahrenheit (16 degrees Celsius) above pre-industrial levels. (more info) Global temperatures may gradually rise over the next several centuries or millennia in response to the carbon dioxide. The elevated levels of the greenhouse gas may then remain in the atmosphere for tens of thousands of years. Kiehl's study, which appeared as a "Perspectives" piece in the January 14, 2011 issue of the journal Science, also indicates that the planet's climate system, over long periods of times, may be at least twice as sensitive to carbon dioxide than currently projected by computer models, which have generally focused on shorter-term warming trends. This is largely because even sophisticated computer models have not yet been able to incorporate critical processes, such as the loss of ice sheets, that take place over centuries or millennia and amplify the initial warming effects of carbon dioxide.
Views: 4122 NCAR & UCAR Science
In the Field - UCAR Services for Earth System Science
 
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Scientists studying the Earth system sometimes need to go to remote regions of the world to collect the data they need to further their research. The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) helps scientists get the data that data by providing research aircraft, ground-based instruments, logistical support, and data processing. Learn more about the the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), which manages NCAR on behalf of the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the resources we offer the research and education community: -- UCAR - Serving the Earth System Science Community https://youtu.be/xr5IFc6PnmY -- Community Modeling https://youtu.be/9zaBIP5tCC0 -- Data Services https://youtu.be/_zKNg-GQDtM -- Science Education https://youtu.be/16MTPVBK7uI More about our field services: -- NCAR’s Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) https://www.eol.ucar.edu -- EOL’s Field Projects https://www.eol.ucar.edu/field-projects -- NSF/NCAR Research Aircraft https://www.eol.ucar.edu/research-aircraft The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research under sponsorship by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.
Views: 985 NCAR & UCAR Science
UCAR - Serving the Earth System Science Community
 
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In 1960, atmospheric scientists from 14 universities came together to form the nonprofit University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) so they could more effectively share resources and build collaborations to transform our understanding of weather, water, the climate, and the Sun-Earth connection. Today, we have grown to include more than 100 member colleges and universities, but the mission remains the same. Through our management of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and UCAR’s community programs, we offer a host of critical resources to the Earth system science community. UCAR manages NCAR under sponsorship by the National Science Foundation. Learn more about these resources: -- In the Field https://youtu.be/dWUdIHsLzvY -- Community Modeling https://youtu.be/9zaBIP5tCC0 -- Data Services https://youtu.be/_zKNg-GQDtM -- Science Education https://youtu.be/16MTPVBK7uI Learn more about UCAR: http://www.ucar.edu The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research under sponsorship by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.
Views: 1669 NCAR & UCAR Science
Air • Planet • People - Introduction to NCAR
 
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At the National Center for Atmospheric Research, we don't forecast the weather. We get inside the weather, climate, and surrounding environment to understand it better. We collaborate with researchers all over the country and all over the world to study the thin layer of air that surrounds our planet and connects all of us to each other. We study the Sun, air chemistry, how the atmosphere interacts with the land and oceans, and how we change and are changed by weather and climate. Find out more: http://www.ucar.edu Visit us: http://scied.ucar.edu/visit The National Center for Atmospheric Research provides research, observing and computing facilities, and a variety of services for the atmospheric and related Earth sciences community. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research serves as a hub for research, education, and public outreach for the atmospheric and related Earth sciences community. We provide services to and promote partnerships within a collaborative community of researchers and educators who are dedicated to understanding the atmosphere—the air around us—and the complex processes that make up the Earth system, from the ocean floor to the Sun's core. NCAR and the UCAR Community Programs are managed by UCAR, a nonprofit consortium of research universities, on behalf of the National Science Foundation and the university community. ©2015 UCAR. Reuse of this video is restricted and permission must be sought from UCAR. Contact: copyright@ucar.edu
Views: 3437 NCAR & UCAR Science
Understanding Our World - John Fasullo, NCAR, on Earth's Climate System
 
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The atmosphere doesn't recognize any national boundaries. It's actually a fluid, and it surrounds Earth. So to understand it, we have to study it globally. NCAR scientist John Fasullo explains how climate scientists study the interaction of the atmosphere, vegetation, ice, oceans, and the Sun using computer models to help answer questions about the complex Earth system—past, present, and future. Research news about climate science and climate change: http://www2.ucar.edu/atmosnews/topics/4094 Understanding climate change - a global warming primer: http://www2.ucar.edu/news/backgrounders/understanding-climate-change-global-warming Excerpted from Air • Planet • People. Watch the 7-minute video to learn more about atmospheric research: http://youtu.be/m5-UqWtxZJ8 __________ The National Center for Atmospheric Research provides research, observing and computing facilities, and a variety of services for the atmospheric and related Earth sciences community. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research serves as a hub for research, education, and public outreach. NCAR and the UCAR Community Programs are managed by UCAR, a nonprofit consortium of research universities, on behalf of the National Science Foundation and the university community. ©UCAR. Reuse of this video is restricted and permission must be sought from UCAR. Contact: copyright@ucar.edu
Views: 507 NCAR & UCAR Science
Community Modeling - UCAR Services for Earth System Science
 
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In collaboration with scientists around the world, researchers at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) have developed a suite of community models that are freely available for anyone to download. These models help scientists make major advances in understanding the climate, weather, the water cycle, atmospheric chemistry, and space weather. Learn more about the the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), which manages NCAR on behalf of the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the resources we offer the research and education community: -- UCAR - Serving the Earth System Science Community https://youtu.be/xr5IFc6PnmY -- In the Field https://youtu.be/dWUdIHsLzvY -- Data Services https://youtu.be/_zKNg-GQDtM -- Science Education https://youtu.be/16MTPVBK7uI Additional links: -- Community Earth System Model (CESM) http://www.cesm.ucar.edu -- Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) http://wrf-model.org/index.php -- Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) https://www2.acom.ucar.edu/gcm/waccm -- Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) https://mpas-dev.github.io/ -- High-performance computing resources https://www2.cisl.ucar.edu/resources/resources-overview The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research under sponsorship by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.
Views: 1156 NCAR & UCAR Science
Yarnell Hill Fire: Scientific Visualization
 
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On June 30, 2013, 19 firefighters were killed during the Yarnell Hill wildfire when a gust front coming from the northeast blew across the fire, changing its direction and making it spread rapidly across the area where the firefighters were sheltered. The animation depicts a CAWFE coupled weather-wildland fire model simulation of the Yarnell Hill Fire. The horizontal resolution was 370 m, a vector is shown each 4 model grid points. It begins at 2 am on 6/30/13. The fire is initialized in the model using the ~3 am VIIRS active fire detection map. Each frame is 1 minute apart, the sequence extends until 8:15 pm on 6/30. The fatality occurred around 4:45 PM. The color bar on the right indicates the heat flux (watts per square meter) from the fire, with more intensely burning areas in bright yellow and white, and less intensely burning areas in darker reds. In the simulation, solar heating stirs up the boundary layer circulations throughout the day. Convection occurs in outer domains (not shown) to the northeast (upper right), creating high-based convective clouds as upper level air flows southeast over the Mogollon Rim. Rain falls into a very dry boundary layer, creating a broad gust front that reaches the south edge of the fire at frame 936. Comparison with the fatality report suggest the simulated timing for the gust front reaching the northeast edge of the fire and the fatality site are within 15 minutes of occurrence.
Views: 1628 NCAR & UCAR Science
Visualizations created with the Yellowstone supercomputer
 
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Six clips of scientific visualizations created using the power of the Yellowstone supercomputer housed at the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center. Links to the full clips are below. Water vapor in the global atmosphere: https://youtu.be/4794mgJLTbU Clustering of high-density cloud droplets: https://youtu.be/hKVZr2mM644 Sea spray in high winds: https://youtu.be/U2puDOmkDs4 Peak ground velocities during California earthquake: https://youtu.be/4ij3XDLXHvg Ocean surface turbulence driven by winds, waves, and temperatures: https://youtu.be/BiBmEIzzhWs Physics and dynamics of turbulent clouds: https://youtu.be/5g9OH7qriA4
Views: 1681 NCAR & UCAR Science
Volcanoes' Impact on the Atmosphere - NCAR Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model
 
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More about this: https://www2.ucar.edu/atmosnews/just-published/20003/volcanic-emissions-more-meets-eye Scientist have used an innovative combination of observations and computer models to quantify atmospheric aerosols (tiny particles) from volcanic eruptions. This video shows amounts of those sulfate aerosols circulating in the atmosphere from late 2004 to late 2015. Volcanic eruptions are indicated by red triangles; the first (at 0:06) occurs in February 2005. Because aerosols play a role in cooling Earth's surface, volcanic activity since 2005 may have significantly reduced rates of global warming. Credit: @UCAR. Scientific visualization by Michael Mills, NCAR.
Views: 1285 NCAR & UCAR Science
Parting the waters, Part 2: Carl Drews on wind setdown research
 
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NCAR researcher Carl Drews discusses the results of a computer modeling study that shows how a sustained wind can temporarily lower water levels (see http://www2.ucar.edu/news/parting-waters-computer-modeling-applies-physics-red-sea-escape-route ). The research he describes arose out of his master's thesis in atmospheric and oceanic sciences. The research is published in the online journal, PLoS ONE and is part of Drews's larger research project with oceanographer Weiqing Han (University of Colorado) into the impacts of winds on water depths, including the extent to which Pacific Ocean typhoons can drive storm surges. By pinpointing a possible site south of the Mediterranean Sea for a potential Red Sea crossing, the study also could be of benefit to experts seeking to research whether such an event ever took place. (Visualization by Tim Scheitlin and Ryan McVeigh, NCAR; based on model simulations.) An animation based on this computer modeling research is here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XZqIZqDh1ns
Views: 79225 NCAR & UCAR Science
VORTEX2 - Roger Wakimoto on Tornado Megastudy
 
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NCAR's Roger Wakimoto, a principal investigator for VORTEX2, explains some of the science behind the field project. He will be using video and damage surveys to analyze the structure of tornadoes. More about the NCAR team: http://www.ucar.edu/news/releases/2009/vortex2.jsp and about VORTEX2: http://www.vortex2.org/home/ Related video - VORTEX2 playlist: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=E8059E0735FE4ABA
Views: 725 NCAR & UCAR Science
Impacts of El Niño on the U.S. - UCAR Congressional Briefing 2015
 
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What drives El Niño and its counterpart, La Niña? How do they affect U.S. weather? How well can we predict the onset of an El Niño? How do strong vs weak events differ? Will the current warming in the Pacific Ocean bring relief to California, Texas, and other drought-stricken areas of the U.S.? What are some of the myths and misconceptions? And what's the state of our scientific knowledge? These and other questions are addressed by the expert panelists in this UCAR Congressional Briefing, held in the Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, D.C., January 15, 2015. _____________ PANELISTS JAN NULL, Lecturer in Meteorology, San José State University and Consultant, Golden Gate Weather Services JOHN NIELSEN-GAMMON, Texas State Climatologist and Regents Professor of Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A&M University CLARA DESER, Senior Scientist and Head of the Climate Analysis Section, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) _____________ FAQ: El Niño, La Niña, and ENSO: http://www2.ucar.edu/news/backgrounders/el-nino-la-nina-enso
Views: 834 NCAR & UCAR Science
Mysterious clouds produced by aircraft - Andrew Heymsfield on hole-punch clouds
 
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As turboprop and jet aircraft climb or descend under certain atmospheric conditions, they can inadvertently seed mid-level clouds and cause narrow bands of snow or rain to develop and fall to the ground (see http://www2.ucar.edu/news/mysterious-clouds-produced-when-aircraft-inadvertently-cause-rain-or-snow ). Through this seeding process, they leave behind odd-shaped holes or channels in the clouds that have long fascinated the public.
Views: 7172 NCAR & UCAR Science
Intense Storm Observed During ERICA - Scientific Visualization
 
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Sometimes a storm is so powerful and so well observed that researchers can spend years learning from its intricate behavior. The low-pressure center depicted here, which is called an extratropical cyclone, took shape over the central North Atlantic Ocean in early January 1989. It was one of the most intense wintertime storms ever observed in that region: air pressure at the surface dipped as low as 928 millibars (27.40 inches of mercury), comparable to the pressure in a Category 3 or 4 hurricane. The storm intensified rapidly as it passed over the Gulf Stream, which ferries warm water northward from the tropics just east of the United States. Research aircraft equipped with sensing instruments for the ERICA field campaign (Experiment on Rapidly Intensifying Cyclones over the Atlantic) captured the data. In this animation, the lines show the trajectories and changes in potential temperature of air parcels as they rise from sea level through the atmosphere. Air generally cools as it rises and warms as it descends. However, its potential temperature changes only when moisture condenses, which adds heat to the atmosphere as clouds, rain, or snow form. Colors range from red (warm) to blue (cold). As the storm gathers strength, the lines wrap more tightly around a center visible just offshore of Newfoundland, and a large plume of rising air stretches to the east and south along a cold front. -----Wind trajectories in ERICA IOP4, an intense marine cyclone of January 1989----- Science: Mel Shapiro, NCAR Simulation: Ryan Maue, WeatherBell Visualization: Alan Norton, NCAR, using VAPOR (Visualization and Analysis Platform for Ocean, Atmosphere, and Solar Researchers) http://www.vapor.ucar.edu
Views: 4214 NCAR & UCAR Science
Parting the waters, Part 1: The physics of a land bridge
 
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Sustained winds can cause an event known as a wind setdown, in which water levels are temporarily lowered (see http://www2.ucar.edu/news/parting-waters-computer-modeling-applies-physics-red-sea-escape-route ). This animation shows how a strong east wind over the Nile Delta could have pushed water back into ancient waterways after blowing for about nine hours, exposing mud flats and possibly providing an overland escape route similar to the biblical account of the Red Sea parting. The animation is based on results from computer modeling that arose out of a master's thesis in atmospheric and oceanic sciences by NCAR researcher Carl Drews. The research is published in the online journal, PLoS ONE and is part of Drews's larger research project with oceanographer Weiqing Han (University of Colorado) into the impacts of winds on water depths, including the extent to which Pacific Ocean typhoons can drive storm surges. By pinpointing a possible site south of the Mediterranean Sea for a potential Red Sea crossing, the study also could be of benefit to experts seeking to research whether such an event ever took place. (Visualization by Tim Scheitlin and Ryan McVeigh, NCAR; based on model simulations.) Carl Drews talks about this research here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=itox6Zn_1G0
Views: 876837 NCAR & UCAR Science
Lifecycle of Hurricane Sandy - Simulation 1: Cloud Tops
 
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Simulation 1: Temperature of the atmosphere at cloud-top height, overlaid with 1000-meter horizontal wind vectors. Shading of clouds corresponds to cloud-top temperature in degrees C (legend at upper left). Higher cloud tops are generally colder. ABOUT THE VISUALIZATIONS IN THIS PLAYLIST These visualizations show how the NCAR-based Advanced Hurricane WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting Model) has depicted various aspects of Hurricane/Superstorm Sandy unfolding over four days (96 hours) in October 2012, from 1200 GMT / 8:00 am EDT 10/26/12 to 1200 GMT / 8:00 am EDT 10/30/12. The model simulations were updated every second. In these videos, each frame is separated by 30 minutes of model time. Each video includes a full-frame visualization, followed by a zoomed-in version of the same sequence that shows the highest-resolution results (500 meters between points). All videos include vectors that show horizontal wind speed and direction at 1000 meters (about 3300 feet) above mean sea level. The length and color of the wind vectors correspond to wind speed (legend not shown). Longer vectors denote stronger winds. ABOUT THE COMPUTER MODELING Researchers began with observations collected at the beginning of the four-day period. They started, or initialized, the AHW model with those data. The model itself, which captures the atmospheric physics associated with hurricanes, then predicted Sandy's behavior over the following four days. The resulting "hindcast" (a forecast conducted after the fact) closely matches the actual behavior of the hurricane/superstorm. The modeling was performed using the Blue Waters Cray XE6 supercomputer at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). The simulation and resulting visualizations are among the most detailed ever conducted for a particular hurricane, with conditions tracked every 500 meters (about 1,600 feet) horizontally. Since the model includes 150 vertical layers, this means that weather conditions were calculated at more than four billion points for each second in the 96-hour simulation. Related story: http://www2.ucar.edu/atmosnews/opinion/10150/new-views-sandy CREDITS Science: Mel Shapiro and Thomas Galarneau, NCAR Visualization: Alan Norton, NCAR, using VAPOR (Visualization and Analysis Platform for Ocean, Atmosphere, and Solar Researchers: http://www.vapor.ucar.edu/) Simulation: Mark Straka, NCSA, and Peter Johnsen, Cray Inc. Postproduction: Perry Domingo, NCAR
Views: 3326 NCAR & UCAR Science
Broken glass, dust, and climate change - Jasper Kok (NCAR)
 
02:41
Related news: http://www2.ucar.edu/news/3510/broken-glass-yields-clues-climate-change Clues to future climate may be found in the way that an ordinary drinking glass shatters. NCAR scientist Jasper Kok has found that microscopic particles of dust, emitted into the atmosphere when dirt breaks apart, follow similar fragment patterns to broken glass and other brittle objects. His research suggests there are several times more dust particles in the atmosphere than previously thought, since shattered dirt appears to produce an unexpectedly high number of large dust fragments. The finding has implications for understanding future climate change because dust plays a significant role in controlling the amount of solar energy in the atmosphere. Depending on their size and other characteristics, some dust particles reflect solar energy and cool the planet, while others trap energy as heat. Kok's research appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science: http://www.pnas.org
Views: 731 NCAR & UCAR Science
Lifecycle of Hurricane Sandy - Simulation 5: Air Parcels
 
01:06
Simulation 5: Trajectories of air parcels, overlaid with 1000-meter horizontal wind vectors. Each strand shows the path taken by an air parcel over time, starting at the 1000-meter level. The model tracks new air parcels from the 1000-meter level as if the parcels were "seeded" every four hours, but no cloud seeding has occurred (the term refers to instructions given to the model to track a new parcel). Colors indicate potential temperature in Kelvins (legend at upper left; 273 K = 0°C = 32°F). This is the temperature each parcel would achieve if it were raised or lowered from a given pressure level height to the 1000-millibar height. When moisture in a rising air mass condenses to form clouds and precipitation, the heat added to the atmosphere through condensation can cause the potential temperature of an air parcel to increase. ABOUT THE VISUALIZATIONS IN THIS PLAYLIST These visualizations show how the NCAR-based Advanced Hurricane WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting Model) has depicted various aspects of Hurricane/Superstorm Sandy unfolding over four days (96 hours) in October 2012, from 1200 GMT / 8:00 am EDT 10/26/12 to 1200 GMT / 8:00 am EDT 10/30/12. The model simulations were updated every second. In these videos, each frame is separated by 30 minutes of model time. Each video includes a full-frame visualization, followed by a zoomed-in version of the same sequence that shows the highest-resolution results (500 meters between points). All videos include vectors that show horizontal wind speed and direction at 1000 meters (about 3300 feet) above mean sea level. The length and color of the wind vectors correspond to wind speed (legend not shown). Longer vectors denote stronger winds. ABOUT THE COMPUTER MODELING Researchers began with observations collected at the beginning of the four-day period. They started, or initialized, the AHW model with those data. The model itself, which captures the atmospheric physics associated with hurricanes, then predicted Sandy's behavior over the following four days. The resulting "hindcast" (a forecast conducted after the fact) closely matches the actual behavior of the hurricane/superstorm. The modeling was performed using the Blue Waters Cray XE6 supercomputer at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). The simulation and resulting visualizations are among the most detailed ever conducted for a particular hurricane, with conditions tracked every 500 meters (about 1,600 feet) horizontally. Since the model includes 150 vertical layers, this means that weather conditions were calculated at more than four billion points for each second in the 96-hour simulation. Related story: http://www2.ucar.edu/atmosnews/opinion/10150/new-views-sandy CREDITS Science: Mel Shapiro and Thomas Galarneau, NCAR Visualization: Alan Norton, NCAR, using VAPOR (Visualization and Analysis Platform for Ocean, Atmosphere, and Solar Researchers: http://www.vapor.ucar.edu/) Simulation: Mark Straka, NCSA, and Peter Johnsen, Cray Inc. Postproduction: Perry Domingo, NCAR
Views: 2138 NCAR & UCAR Science
Science Education - UCAR Services for Earth System Science
 
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The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) is committed to inspiring, nurturing, educating, and supporting tomorrow’s scientists, from kindergartners doing their first experiments to Ph.D.s at the start of their careers. We also offer self-paced, online professional training for anyone seeking to advance their knowledge and skills in predicting the behavior of weather, water, climate, space weather, and other aspects of the Earth system. Learn more about the resources we offer the research and education community through UCAR’s community programs and the National Center for Atmospheric Research, which UCAR manages on behalf of the National Science Foundation (NSF): -- UCAR - Serving the Earth System Science Community https://youtu.be/xr5IFc6PnmY -- In the Field https://youtu.be/dWUdIHsLzvY -- Community Modeling https://youtu.be/9zaBIP5tCC0 -- Data Services https://youtu.be/_zKNg-GQDtM Additional Links: -- UCAR Center for Science Education http://scied.ucar.edu -- Significant Opportunities in Atmospheric Research and Science (SOARS internships) https://www.soars.ucar.edu -- NCAR Advanced Study Program (ASP graduate/postdoctoral fellowships) http://www.asp.ucar.edu/ -- COMET Program (online professional training) http://www.comet.ucar.edu/index.php -- UCAR Visiting Scientists Program (postdoctoral and professional placements) https://vsp.ucar.edu -- Visitor Programs, Internships, Fellowships & Workshops https://www.ucar.edu/opportunities The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research under sponsorship by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.
Views: 593 NCAR & UCAR Science
VORTEX2 - Tornado ground truth - Roger Wakimoto
 
02:34
NCAR Director Roger Wakimoto describes how VORTEX2 researchers investigate tornadoes by taking photos and video of what the mobile radars are seeing. His team gets more of this "ground truth" after a tornado hits by surveying the damage from the air and the ground. Wakimoto, who became director of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in 2010, makes sure he still has time to participate in VORTEX2, the Verification of the Origins and Rotation in Tornadoes Experiment. More about the NCAR teams: http://www2.ucar.edu/news/scientists-track-twisters-world-s-largest-tornado-study and about VORTEX2: http://www.vortex2.org/home . Related video - VORTEX2 playlist: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=E8059E0735FE4ABA
Views: 867 NCAR & UCAR Science
Lifecycle of Hurricane Sandy - Simulation 2: Radar Reflectivity
 
01:29
Simulation 2: Maximum simulated radar reflectivity, overlaid with 1000-meter horizontal wind vectors. Colors indicate the reflectivity (in units dBZ) that a network of radars would observe if located across the ocean and nearby land. Warmer colors (higher dBZ) generally indicate more intense precipitation. ABOUT THE VISUALIZATIONS IN THIS PLAYLIST These visualizations show how the NCAR-based Advanced Hurricane WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting Model) has depicted various aspects of Hurricane/Superstorm Sandy unfolding over four days (96 hours) in October 2012, from 1200 GMT / 8:00 am EDT 10/26/12 to 1200 GMT / 8:00 am EDT 10/30/12. The model simulations were updated every second. In these videos, each frame is separated by 30 minutes of model time. Each video includes a full-frame visualization, followed by a zoomed-in version of the same sequence that shows the highest-resolution results (500 meters between points). All videos include vectors that show horizontal wind speed and direction at 1000 meters (about 3300 feet) above mean sea level. The length and color of the wind vectors correspond to wind speed (legend not shown). Longer vectors denote stronger winds. ABOUT THE COMPUTER MODELING Researchers began with observations collected at the beginning of the four-day period. They started, or initialized, the AHW model with those data. The model itself, which captures the atmospheric physics associated with hurricanes, then predicted Sandy's behavior over the following four days. The resulting "hindcast" (a forecast conducted after the fact) closely matches the actual behavior of the hurricane/superstorm. The modeling was performed using the Blue Waters Cray XE6 supercomputer at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). The simulation and resulting visualizations are among the most detailed ever conducted for a particular hurricane, with conditions tracked every 500 meters (about 1,600 feet) horizontally. Since the model includes 150 vertical layers, this means that weather conditions were calculated at more than four billion points for each second in the 96-hour simulation. Related story: http://www2.ucar.edu/atmosnews/opinion/10150/new-views-sandy CREDITS Science: Mel Shapiro and Thomas Galarneau, NCAR Visualization: Alan Norton, NCAR, using VAPOR (Visualization and Analysis Platform for Ocean, Atmosphere, and Solar Researchers: http://www.vapor.ucar.edu/) Simulation: Mark Straka, NCSA, and Peter Johnsen, Cray Inc. Postproduction: Perry Domingo, NCAR
Views: 5013 NCAR & UCAR Science
How much could population trends influence climate? - Brian O'Neill (NCAR)
 
02:37
Related news: http://www2.ucar.edu/news/population-trends-another-influence-climate-change Changes in population growth and composition, including aging and urbanization, could significantly affect global emissions of carbon dioxide over the next 40 years. NCAR scientist Brian O'Neill explains new research showing that a slowing of population growth, following one of the slower growth paths considered plausible by demographers at the United Nations, could contribute to significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions. O'Neill led an international team of researchers who found that such slow growth paths by 2050 could account for 16 to 29 percent of the emissions reductions thought necessary to keep global temperatures from causing serious impacts. The effect of slower population growth on greenhouse gas emissions would be even larger by the end of the century. The researchers caution that their findings do not imply that policies affecting aging or urbanization should be implemented as a response to climate change, but rather that better understanding of these trends would help anticipate future changes. The research is a collaboration between scientists from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration.
Views: 1721 NCAR & UCAR Science
Introducing HIAPER - the NSF/NCAR Gulfstream V Research Aircraft
 
16:33
HIAPER, a transformed Gulfstream V corporate jet, is a no-frills research aircraft capable of probing high into the atmosphere and flying to the most remote areas of the globe. First conceived in the 1980s and six years in the making, this $81.5 million aircraft is the largest community project undertaken to date by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. The aircraft is owned by the National Science Foundation (NCAR's sponsor) and maintained and operated on behalf of the atmospheric and Earth science community by NCAR. Learn more about HIAPER, the NSF/NCAR G-V aircraft: http://www.eol.ucar.edu/instrumentation/aircraft/G-V Follow HIAPER during its next research mission: http://www.eol.ucar.edu/field_projects
Views: 16128 NCAR & UCAR Science
High Park Wildfire - Scientific Visualization
 
03:58
The High Park wildfire raged west of Fort Collins, Colorado, in June 2012. The fire occurred amidst historic widespread drought that created very dry fuels and destroyed thousands of acres of forest and 259 homes. Ignited by a lightning strike on June 7 and lasting for weeks, the fire began spreading rapidly on June 9 during a strong downslope windstorm, an event that is rare in June. In this simulation of the first 21 hours, the viewer is looking toward the north. Fort Collins lies to the right and Poudre Canyon lies along the northernmost boundary of the image. Each frame is 1 minute apart, and the total animation covers local Mountain Daylight Time from 5:45 a.m. on 6/9/12 to 3:00 a.m. on 6/10/12. The misty field represents smoke. It becomes more opaque and changes from white to gray where the particulate concentration is higher. The colors represent the sensible heat fluxes released by the fire and show the actively burning regions. (This measure of the rate of energy release is calculated in watts per square meter, W/m^-2, as indicated on the color scale at right ). The color scale can also be used as a relative guide to where the fire is burning weakly (darker reds) or intensely (brighter yellows). The surface is dark brown where fire has passed. Red arrows represent the near-surface wind speed (longer arrows indicate faster winds) and wind direction (arrows point downwind). The simulation was created with an NCAR computer model that not only includes how wind, topography, fuel type, and fuel moisture affect the growth of a fire, but also portrays how a growing wildfire changes the wind conditions, creating its own "fire weather." The modeling for the High Park wildfire captured several features of the actual fire's behavior. During its early stage, the fire was sheltered from the strong westerly winds and grew to the northeast, driven by gusty winds produced by mountain peaks to the southwest. Once the fire climbed intermediate ridges, it was exposed to the downslope windstorm's strong westerly winds (35-45 meters per second, or about 78-100 miles per hour) and rapidly ran eastward. The High Park wildfire created a deep smoke plume that severely affected the air quality of several communities along the Colorado Front Range. This fire was extreme because of the combination of a climate event (drought) and a weather event (the windstorm). This simulation is helping scientists understand the conditions causing the most devastating wildfires. --Coupled Weather-Fire Simulation of the 2012 High Park Wildfire-- Visualization: Janice Coen and Mel Shapiro, NCAR, using VAPOR (Visualization and Analysis Platform for Ocean, Atmosphere, and Solar Researchers) http://www.vapor.ucar.edu More information: http://www.mmm.ucar.edu/people/coen/files/newpage_m.html
Views: 1785 NCAR & UCAR Science
Lifecycle of Hurricane Sandy - All Five Simulations at Ultrafine Resolution
 
06:24
These visualizations show how the NCAR-based Advanced Hurricane WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting Model) has depicted various aspects of Hurricane/Superstorm Sandy unfolding over four days (96 hours) in October 2012, from 1200 GMT / 8:00 am EDT 10/26/12 to 1200 GMT / 8:00 am EDT 10/30/12. The model simulations were updated every second. In these videos, each frame is separated by 30 minutes of model time. Each segment in this compilation includes a full-frame visualization, followed by a zoomed-in version of the same sequence that shows the highest-resolution results (500 meters between points). All segments include vectors that show horizontal wind speed and direction at 1000 meters (about 3300 feet) above mean sea level. The length and color of the wind vectors correspond to wind speed (legend not shown). Longer vectors denote stronger winds. Each segment is also available as a separate video in this Playlist. --Simulation 1: (00:32--01:44) Temperature of the atmosphere at cloud-top height, overlaid with 1000-meter horizontal wind vectors. Shading of clouds corresponds to cloud-top temperature in degrees C (legend at upper left). Higher cloud tops are generally colder. --Simulation 2 (01:44--02:57) Maximum simulated radar reflectivity, overlaid with 1000-meter horizontal wind vectors. Colors indicate the reflectivity (in units dBZ) that a network of radars would observe if located across the ocean and nearby land. Warmer colors (higher dBZ) generally indicate more intense precipitation. . --Simulation 3 (02:58--04:12) Potential temperature at 1000 meters above mean sea level, overlaid with 1000-meter horizontal wind vectors. Potential temperature is the temperature that a parcel of air would achieve if it were raised or lowered from a given pressure height to the 1000-millibar pressure height. Values are shown in degrees Celsius (legend at upper left). --Simulation 4 (04:12--05:26) Wind speed at 1000 meters above mean sea level, overlaid with 1000-meter horizontal wind vectors. Color field denotes wind speed in meters per second (1 m/s = 2.24 mph). --Simulation 5 (05:27--06:20) Trajectories of air parcels, overlaid with 1000-meter horizontal wind vectors. Each strand shows the path taken by an air parcel over time, starting at the 1000-meter level. The model tracks new air parcels from the 1000-meter level as if the parcels were "seeded" every four hours, but no cloud seeding has occurred (the term refers to instructions given to the model to track a new parcel). Colors indicate potential temperature in Kelvins (legend at upper left; 273 K = 0°C = 32°F). This is the temperature each parcel would achieve if it were raised or lowered from a given pressure level height to the 1000-millibar height. When moisture in a rising air mass condenses to form clouds and precipitation, the heat added to the atmosphere through condensation can cause the potential temperature of an air parcel to increase. ABOUT THE COMPUTER MODELING Researchers began with observations collected at the beginning of the four-day period. They started, or initialized, the AHW model with those data. The model itself, which captures the atmospheric physics associated with hurricanes, then predicted Sandy's behavior over the following four days. The resulting "hindcast" (a forecast conducted after the fact) closely matches the actual behavior of the hurricane/superstorm. The modeling was performed using the Blue Waters Cray XE6 supercomputer at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). The simulation and resulting visualizations are among the most detailed ever conducted for a particular hurricane, with conditions tracked every 500 meters (about 1,600 feet) horizontally. Since the model includes 150 vertical layers, this means that weather conditions were calculated at more than four billion points for each second in the 96-hour simulation. Related story: http://www2.ucar.edu/atmosnews/opinion/10150/new-views-sandy CREDITS Science: Mel Shapiro and Thomas Galarneau, NCAR Visualization: Alan Norton, NCAR, using VAPOR (Visualization and Analysis Platform for Ocean, Atmosphere, and Solar Researchers: http://www.vapor.ucar.edu/) Simulation: Mark Straka, NCSA, and Peter Johnsen, Cray Inc. Postproduction: Perry Domingo, NCAR
Views: 3997 NCAR & UCAR Science
Why are climate scientists so conservative? - Naomi Oreskes, UC San Diego - Schneider Symposium 2011
 
05:07
Naomi Oreskes, professor of history and science studies at the University of California, San Diego and adjunct professor of geosciences at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, holds degrees in geological science and the history of science. She took a break during the 2011 Stephen Schneider Symposium on Climate Change to describe some of her current research. ---More about Dr. Oreskes: http://history.ucsd.edu/people/faculty/oreskes-naomi.html ---Symposium playlist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL938B266297A81FE7 ---About the Stephen H. Schneider Symposium: http://stephenschneider.stanford.edu/Symposium/SHS_symposium.html
Views: 1992 NCAR & UCAR Science
Lifecycle of Hurricane Sandy - Simulation 3: Potential Temperature
 
01:26
Simulation 3: Potential temperature at 1000 meters above mean sea level, overlaid with 1000-meter horizontal wind vectors. Potential temperature is the temperature that a parcel of air would achieve if it were raised or lowered from a given pressure height to the 1000-millibar pressure height. Values are shown in degrees Celsius (legend at upper left). ABOUT THE VISUALIZATIONS IN THIS PLAYLIST These visualizations show how the NCAR-based Advanced Hurricane WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting Model) has depicted various aspects of Hurricane/Superstorm Sandy unfolding over four days (96 hours) in October 2012, from 1200 GMT / 8:00 am EDT 10/26/12 to 1200 GMT / 8:00 am EDT 10/30/12. The model simulations were updated every second. In these videos, each frame is separated by 30 minutes of model time. Each video includes a full-frame visualization, followed by a zoomed-in version of the same sequence that shows the highest-resolution results (500 meters between points). All videos include vectors that show horizontal wind speed and direction at 1000 meters (about 3300 feet) above mean sea level. The length and color of the wind vectors correspond to wind speed (legend not shown). Longer vectors denote stronger winds. ABOUT THE COMPUTER MODELING Researchers began with observations collected at the beginning of the four-day period. They started, or initialized, the AHW model with those data. The model itself, which captures the atmospheric physics associated with hurricanes, then predicted Sandy's behavior over the following four days. The resulting "hindcast" (a forecast conducted after the fact) closely matches the actual behavior of the hurricane/superstorm. The modeling was performed using the Blue Waters Cray XE6 supercomputer at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). The simulation and resulting visualizations are among the most detailed ever conducted for a particular hurricane, with conditions tracked every 500 meters (about 1,600 feet) horizontally. Since the model includes 150 vertical layers, this means that weather conditions were calculated at more than four billion points for each second in the 96-hour simulation. Related story: http://www2.ucar.edu/atmosnews/opinion/10150/new-views-sandy CREDITS Science: Mel Shapiro and Thomas Galarneau, NCAR Visualization: Alan Norton, NCAR, using VAPOR (Visualization and Analysis Platform for Ocean, Atmosphere, and Solar Researchers: http://www.vapor.ucar.edu/) Simulation: Mark Straka, NCSA, and Peter Johnsen, Cray Inc. Postproduction: Perry Domingo, NCAR
Views: 2558 NCAR & UCAR Science
High-performance computing + geoscience + education = CISL
 
04:32
CISL (say: "Sizzle") is the Computational and Information Systems Lab at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. We're a high-performance computing facility, a computational science lab, and we provide educational services designed to get students excited about high performance computing. Find out more at http://www2.cisl.ucar.edu @2015 UCAR. All rights reserved The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research manages the National Center for Atmospheric Research under sponsorship by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this video are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.
Views: 495 NCAR & UCAR Science
Ocean currents likely to carry oil to Atlantic
 
00:34
Update: February 28, 2011 - What happened to the oil? Detectable amounts never made it to the Atlantic, at least not in an easily visible form on the ocean surface. In this follow-up article we review: * the difference between a projection and an actual forecast * the challenges of making short-term projections of natural processes that can act chaotically, such as ocean currents. See: http://www2.ucar.edu/currents/what-happened-oil ------ June 3, 2010 A detailed computer modeling study released June 3, 2010, indicates that oil from the massive spill in the Gulf of Mexico might soon extend along thousands of miles of the Atlantic coast and open ocean as early as this summer (see http://www2.ucar.edu/news/ocean-currents-likely-to-carry-oil-spill-to-atlantic-coast ). The modeling results are captured in a series of dramatic animations produced by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and collaborators. The colors represent a dilution factor ranging from red (most concentrated) to beige (most diluted). The simulations do not make any assumptions about the daily rate or total amount of oil spilled and the dilution factor does not attempt to estimate the actual barrels of oil at any spot. Instead, one unit per day of a liquid "dye tracer" is injected in the model at the spill site (injected continuously over the period April 20 through June 20). The animation on this page shows possible scenarios of what might happen to dye released in the upper 65 feet of ocean at the spill site. The dilution factor depicts how dye released at the site of the spill will be progressively diluted as it is transported and mixed by ocean currents. For example, areas showing a dilution factor of 0.01 would have one-hundredth the concentration of oil present at the spill site. The animation is based on a computer model simulation, using a virtual dye, that assumes weather and current conditions similar to those that occur in a typical year. It is one of a set of six scenarios (see http://www2.ucar.edu/news/oil-spill-animations ) that simulate possible pathways the oil might take under a variety of oceanic conditions. Each of the six scenarios shows the same overall movement of oil through the Gulf to the Atlantic and up the East Coast. However, the timing and fine-scale details differ, depending on the details of the ocean currents in the Gulf. (Visualization by Tim Scheitlin and Mary Haley, NCAR; based on model simulations.) A Google Earth visualization was released on June 17, 2010, with a 0.0005 concentration cutoff. The YouTube version is here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2DS6smLuzBk
Views: 953741 NCAR & UCAR Science
Where's the missing heat? Kevin Trenberth (NCAR) on solar energy & climate change
 
00:57
Current observational tools cannot account for roughly half of the heat that is believed to have built up on Earth in recent years, according to NCAR scientists (see http://www2.ucar.edu/news/missing-heat-may-affect-future-climate-change ). The researchers warn that satellite sensors, ocean floats, and other instruments are inadequate to track this missing heat, which may be building up in the deep oceans or elsewhere in the climate system.
Views: 3472 NCAR & UCAR Science
The Air We Breathe - Christine Wiedinmyer, NCAR
 
00:56
Atmospheric chemist Christine Wiedinmyer explains where smog comes from. It's a recipe that starts with the natural chemicals emitted by vegetation, which are harmless until they encounter the chemicals we produce from our daily activities, including manufacturing, driving, and farming. Add some sunlight and you've cooked up a smog alert. More about air quality & pollution research: http://www2.ucar.edu/atmosnews/topics/4093 http://ncar.ucar.edu/learn-more-about/pollution Excerpted from Air • Planet • People. Watch the 7-minute video to learn more about atmospheric research: http://youtu.be/m5-UqWtxZJ8 __________ ©UCAR. Reuse of this video is restricted and permission must be sought from UCAR. Contact: copyright@ucar.edu The National Center for Atmospheric Research provides research, observing and computing facilities, and a variety of services for the atmospheric and related Earth sciences community. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research serves as a hub for research, education, and public outreach. NCAR and the UCAR Community Programs are managed by UCAR, a nonprofit consortium of research universities, on behalf of the National Science Foundation and the university community.
Views: 442 NCAR & UCAR Science
What are the Roaring 40s? NCAR Surface Wind Simulation
 
00:49
Sailors who venture far south have known for centuries about “the roaring 40s,” where the winds blow fast and fierce. In the Northern Hemisphere, friction from the continents slows the westerly winds and the storms they shepherd along. But in the Southern Hemisphere, there are no landmasses between 40 and 50 degrees. Here, winds scream unhindered across the ocean, giving rise to their roaring reputation. This high-res simulation of surface winds gives mesmerizing insight into the power of the roaring 40s. This brief highlight comes from: Surface Wind Speed from a High Resolution Simulation of Present Day Earth Using the Community Earth System Model, NCAR VisLab: https://youtu.be/tlQHki79K84
Views: 165 NCAR & UCAR Science
Plasma jets shooting up from Sun's surface into the solar corona
 
01:03
Related news: http://www2.ucar.edu/news/3548/plasma-jets-are-prime-suspect-solar-mystery One of the most enduring mysteries in solar physics is why the Sun's outer atmosphere, or corona, is millions of degrees hotter than its surface. Now scientists believe they have discovered a major source of hot gas that replenishes the corona: narrow jets of plasma, known as spicules, shooting up from just above the Sun's surface. The finding addresses a fundamental question in astrophysics: how energy moves from the Sun's interior to create its hot outer atmosphere. Images of the Sun taken 24 seconds apart by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory satellite on the morning of April 25, 2010, show the rapid motion of this heat transfer process. The spicules themselves are so faint that scientists use image series like these, called a running time difference, to see disturbances associated with the spicules where they are emerging (in white) and where they have just been (in black). The spicules streak upward from the solar surface at speeds often greater than 100 kilometers per second (60 miles/sec). Some of the spicules' plasma (ionized gas), which can reach temperatures in excess of one million degrees kelvin, flows up into the corona. Six seconds of data has been looped several times to create the total running time of one minute. A team of researchers from Lockheed Martin's Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and the University of Oslo published this research in the January 7, 2011, issue of Science - http://www.sciencemag.org/magazine Images courtesy NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, Atmospheric Imaging Assembly - http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sdo/main/
Views: 2614 NCAR & UCAR Science
Next-Generation Hurricane Prediction - UCAR Congressional Briefing 2015
 
01:03:05
Since Hurricane Katrina made landfall in 20015, storm prediction technology has seen dramatic forward movement, from improved software to better use of observations and increased computing power - all aimed at giving emergency decision makers more time and specifics to help protect lives and property. The expert panelists in this UCAR Congressional Briefing outline research advances that have led to better forecasting of hurricane and tropical storm weather and impacts. And they spotlight research directions that hold promise for future improvements. ______________ PANELISTS SHUYI CHEN, Professor of Meteorology and Physical Oceanography,, Department of Ocean Sciences, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Miami SYTSKE KIMBALL, Professor of Meteorology and Chair of the Department of Earth Sciences; Director, Center for Hurricane Intensity and Landfall Investigation; University of South Alabama CHRISTOPHER DAVIS, Senior Scientist and Director of the Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research ______________ Hosted by UCAR President Thomas Bogdan in the Capitol Visitor Center, Washington, D.C. June 23, 2015. Background: Hurricanes - Hazard Briefing: https://president.ucar.edu/development/capability/hurricanes
Views: 337 NCAR & UCAR Science
The future of drought - NCAR GIS Program
 
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The animation represents a 3-year running average of the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) for historical and future RCP 4.5 projections. Shaded regions show areas where cropland is at least 10% of the land area (using static 2015 Crop Data Layer (CDL)). Drier regions are represented with negative PDSI values and colors from red, brown and yellow. Wetter regions are represented by positive PDSI values and colors from green, blue, and magenta. The PDSI data was generated by Aiguo Dai from University at Albany, SUNY. Data Details: PDSI is used because it considers changes in both water supply (Precip) and demand (PET), while SPI is based on precipitation only (thus not effect of rising T through its effect on PET). SPEI is a relatively new index that consider the simple P-PET difference. To some decrease it is related to PDSI, but the PDSI has a longer history and more complicated treatment of the surface water balance. The PDSI model outputs other variables that may be more comparable to SPEI than the PDSI for short time scale variations, but most people just use the PDSI. The historical sc_PDSI_pm from CAS website is an estimate based observational data. The trend is generally consistent with model historical simulations, but read following paper for large regional differences (due to natural variability). Citation: Dai, A., 2013: Increasing drought under global warming in observations and models. Nature Climate Change. 3: 52-58. doi:10.1038/nclimate1633, (http://www.nature.com/nclimate/journal/v3/n1/full/nclimate1633.html). The data is from CMIP5 multi-model ensemble mean sc_PDSI_pm (self-calibrated PDSI with Penman-Monteith PET), which includes model historical and future simulations (no breaks in the model series). Citation: Zhao, T., and A. Dai, 2015: The magnitude and causes of global drought changes in the 21st century under a low-moderate emissions scenario. J. Climate, 28, 4490–4512. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/JCLI-D-14-00363.1.
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